15 episodes

Studies in National and International Development (SNID) is the longest-running weekly, interdisciplinary seminar series at Queen's University. Since 1983, SNID has proudly hosted prominent Canadian and international scholars who bring fresh perspectives to issues of local, national and global development. SNID has also organized several major workshops and conferences that have resulted in numerous publications. SNID serves a large, varied constituency of faculty, graduate students, undergraduates, and community participants.



This podcast series features audio footage of the SNID lecture series. During the academic year, SNID organizes weekly seminars, which are normally held on Thursdays from 1:00 to 2:30 pm in Mackintosh Corry Hall, Room D214. Please consult the SNID Lecture listing on this website for possible changes in dates and venue. SNID also regularly sponsors conferences, film festivals, workshops and other development-related activities, all of which are posted in advance on our Lecture Calendar.



All SNID events are free and open to the public.

Studies in National and International Development Podcast Series – CFRC Podcast Network CFRC.ca Podcast Network

    • Society & Culture

Studies in National and International Development (SNID) is the longest-running weekly, interdisciplinary seminar series at Queen's University. Since 1983, SNID has proudly hosted prominent Canadian and international scholars who bring fresh perspectives to issues of local, national and global development. SNID has also organized several major workshops and conferences that have resulted in numerous publications. SNID serves a large, varied constituency of faculty, graduate students, undergraduates, and community participants.



This podcast series features audio footage of the SNID lecture series. During the academic year, SNID organizes weekly seminars, which are normally held on Thursdays from 1:00 to 2:30 pm in Mackintosh Corry Hall, Room D214. Please consult the SNID Lecture listing on this website for possible changes in dates and venue. SNID also regularly sponsors conferences, film festivals, workshops and other development-related activities, all of which are posted in advance on our Lecture Calendar.



All SNID events are free and open to the public.

    • video
    Translation and 20th Century Intellectual History in Latin America

    Translation and 20th Century Intellectual History in Latin America

    María Constanza Guzmán

    The author of Mapping Spaces of Translation in Twentieth-Century Latin American Print Culture discusses her investigation of the interplay of translation and Latin American intellectual history in the 20th century. She reflects on translation in 20th-century Latin American print culture, tracing the trajectory of influential periodicals and publishing houses from the 60s and 70s. Guzmán unpacks the complex tensions that arise in Latin American “spaces of translation”, between enabling the perpetuation of colonial legacies and illuminating collective efforts to mobilize translation as a decolonial tool. The study allows for an analysis of translation in cultural institutions and provides a lens through which to uncover linguistic plurality past borders of seemingly monolingual ideologies.

    • 43 min
    • video
    The Horn of Africa in Crisis: The war in Tingray and Forced Migration

    The Horn of Africa in Crisis: The war in Tingray and Forced Migration

    In early November 2020, a civil war broke out in Ethiopia that quickly turned into a humanitarian crisis. The raging conflict, involving neighboring Eritrea, risks destabilizing the whole Horn of Africa region. It jeopardized the safety of more than 90,000 Eritrean refugees in the Tigray region of Ethiopia, and displaced hundreds of thousands of Tigrayans from their home, 60,000 of whom crossed the border into Sudan as refugees. This panel will discuss the intersection of conflicts and migration in the Horn of Africa with special attention to the root causes of the ongoing conflict and the displacement of civilians that preceded and followed it.

    Meron Estifanos, Eritrean Human Rights activist and co-founder of the International Commission on Eritrean Refugees. She is also the host and presenter of Radio Erena’s weekly program known as “Voices of Eritrean Refugees,” that airs from Paris.

    Tsedale Lemma,  Founding Editor and Editor-in-Chief of Addis Standard, Ethiopia. The English publication reports critically on domestic and foreign sociopolitical current affairs impacting Ethiopia. Tsedale Lemma has previously served in Ethiopia’s foreign missions and has given many talks, including testifying in front of US House foreign relations sub-committee on Africa.

    Dr. Awet T. Weldemichael, Professor and Queen’s National Scholar in the Department of History, Queen’s University, and a member of the Royal Society of Canada, College of New Scholars. He is an expert of the Horn of Africa and has been closely following the ongoing web of conflicts in the region.

    Moderated by Dr. Reena Kukreja, Assistant Professor, Global Development Studies, Queen’s University.

    • 1 hr 22 min
    Mutual Aid: Covid -19 and Beyond

    Mutual Aid: Covid -19 and Beyond

    Join SNID for a panel discussion about the role of grassroots movements and local activism during COVID-19 with Jade Da Costa of The People’s Pantry (Toronto/Tkaronto), Tom deGrey of the Downtown Eastside SRO Collaborative (Vancouver/Unceded Coast Salish Territory), Queen’s Post-Doctoral Fellow in Geography and Planning Dani Aiello, and Liz Turner of Mutual Aid Katarokwi (Kingston/Katarokwi).

    This panel discussion took place virtually on February 11th 2021 at 1 PM.

    • 1 hr 26 min
    Dr. Scott Rutherford on The Histories of ‘Red Power’ in Canada

    Dr. Scott Rutherford on The Histories of ‘Red Power’ in Canada

    This episode features a presentation by Dr. Scott Rutherford (Queen’s University).  He discusses the histories of “Red Power” in Canada within a broader context of global anti-colonial and anti-racist movements of the 1960s and early 1970s. He attempts to make sense of the complicated ways that global reference points were used to describe local protests; how mainstream media, police and government, for example, often framed such high profile moments, to borrow Trouillot’s words, as impossible events that only took place because of various “outside” influences. He also discusses how Indigenous activists challenged such discourse by insisting that, for example, park occupations, border protests and rights marches be understood within longer histories of empire and resistance; ideas and actions that were shaped both by local experience as well as transnational processes.

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Educating Artists in 2020: What the Pandemic has Taught Us

    Educating Artists in 2020: What the Pandemic has Taught Us

    The pandemic has magnified many issues that we face as a society, including post-secondary programming in the arts, including music. Post-secondary music programs have been criticized in recent years for their lack of equity and diversity, a problem that is undeniably systemic. Changes to post-secondary curricula need to better reflect a diversity of arts-making and makers, as well as support an understanding of the nature and scope of careers within the arts. Without illuminating this pathway, and making it as direct as possible, post-secondary music programs are inevitably excluding many potential students from choosing to study music in post-secondary education. In this talk, we will describe the cultural domains in Canada and the different ways that artists can work within and/or across them. We also highlight some of the challenges faced by the industry and offer some insights about how changes in post-secondary programs could better equip musicians to diversify their craft and/or pivot across domains. We also identify some areas for policy changes that could better support the industry and the individuals that work within it.

    Dr. Julia Brook is an Assistant Professor of Music Education at the Dan School of Drama and Music, Queen’s University in Kingston. She holds degrees in Piano Performance and Music Education. Her SSHRC and CFI-funded research examines ways to ensure accessible and appropriate music education programs in schools, higher education and the community. Dr. Brook has worked as an elementary and specifically education music teacher, studio piano teacher and collaborative pianist.

    Dr. Colleen Renihan is Assistant Professor and Queen’s National Scholar in Music Theatre and Opera at the Dan School of Drama and Music. She holds degrees in Voice Performance and Musicology. Her book, The Operatic Archive: American Opera as History, was published this year. Colleen is embarking on a SSHRC and CFI-funded project with Dr. Julia Brook that investigates universal design principles for music theatre performance, and they have just completed a SSHRC funded project examining the scope and nature of work for musicians across Canada’s cultural domains.

    Ben Schnitzer a PhD candidate in Cultural Studies at Queen’s, where he also taught in the School of Policy Studies. After studying voice and performing in Canada and in Europe, Ben completed a Master of Public Service (Waterloo) and worked in cultural policy for the Canadian government. A member of the North American Cultural Diplomacy Initiative (NACDI) and was awarded a Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship from SSHRC to support his research on Canadian cultural diplomacy in the contemporary period.

    Recorded via Zoom, November 5th 2020

    • 1 hr 14 min
    Facets of uneven development in the European border regime: The economic geographies of migrant camps in Greece

    Facets of uneven development in the European border regime: The economic geographies of migrant camps in Greece

    In the aftermath of the so-called “refugee crisis” of 2015-16, the migration regime consolidating in Europe entails the management of newcoming populations through their accommodation in camps. This talk will account for neglected aspects of this process in the case of Greece, focusing on the everyday economic practices, interactions and networks emerging in, around and because of camps. Drawing on examples from recent filed research, it will highlight the “productive” functions and economic geographies of migrant camps.

    Dr Panos Hatziprokopiou is Assistant Professor at the School of Spatial Planning & development, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. He has studied economics, sociology and human geography in Greece and the UK. His research interests focus on socio-spatial aspects of migrants’ settlement, labour market pathways, housing geographies and everyday interactions. He is currently involved in a European project on transnational figurations of protracted displacement and the role of mobility and connectivity.

    Dr. Hatziprokopiou gave his virtual presentation on Thursday November 26th at 1 PM for SNID.

    Content recorded by SNID and provided as is to CFRC with permission of the lecturer.

    • 1 hr 27 min

Top Podcasts In Society & Culture