7 episodes

Studies in National and International Development (SNID) is the longest-running weekly, interdisciplinary seminar series at Queen's University. Since 1983, SNID has proudly hosted prominent Canadian and international scholars who bring fresh perspectives to issues of local, national and global development. SNID has also organized several major workshops and conferences that have resulted in numerous publications. SNID serves a large, varied constituency of faculty, graduate students, undergraduates, and community participants.



This podcast series features audio footage of the SNID lecture series. During the academic year, SNID organizes weekly seminars, which are normally held on Thursdays from 1:00 to 2:30 pm in Mackintosh Corry Hall, Room D214. Please consult the SNID Lecture listing on this website for possible changes in dates and venue. SNID also regularly sponsors conferences, film festivals, workshops and other development-related activities, all of which are posted in advance on our Lecture Calendar.



All SNID events are free and open to the public.

Studies in National and International Development Podcast Series – CFRC Podcast Network CFRC.ca Podcast Network

    • Documentary

Studies in National and International Development (SNID) is the longest-running weekly, interdisciplinary seminar series at Queen's University. Since 1983, SNID has proudly hosted prominent Canadian and international scholars who bring fresh perspectives to issues of local, national and global development. SNID has also organized several major workshops and conferences that have resulted in numerous publications. SNID serves a large, varied constituency of faculty, graduate students, undergraduates, and community participants.



This podcast series features audio footage of the SNID lecture series. During the academic year, SNID organizes weekly seminars, which are normally held on Thursdays from 1:00 to 2:30 pm in Mackintosh Corry Hall, Room D214. Please consult the SNID Lecture listing on this website for possible changes in dates and venue. SNID also regularly sponsors conferences, film festivals, workshops and other development-related activities, all of which are posted in advance on our Lecture Calendar.



All SNID events are free and open to the public.

    Canada is so Polite: Prisons, Deportation and Policing Blackness in Canada

    Canada is so Polite: Prisons, Deportation and Policing Blackness in Canada

    Date: February 27, 2020Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214Time: 1:00 PM – 2:30 PMSpeaker:  El Jones, Mount St. Vincent University







    “El Jones is the Black liberation visionary of our time” – Robyn Maynard, author of Policing Black Lives: State Violence in Canada from Slavery to the Present 







    El Jones, Mount St. Vincent University







    The former Poet Laureate of Halifax, El Jones is also a journalist, activist, and academic. She holds the Nancy Chair in Women’s Studies at Mount St Vincent University in Halifax. A well-known researcher in the fields of prison justice and anti racism, she has addressed audiences all over Canada

    • 1 hr 22 min
    Reproductive Empires: Charting the Political Economy of ART in the Global South

    Reproductive Empires: Charting the Political Economy of ART in the Global South

    Date: March 12, 2020Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214Time: 1:00 PM – 2:30 PMSpeaker:  Bronwyn Parry, King’s College London







    The global use of Assistive Reproductive Technologies (ARTs) to address structural infertility has burgeoned since the early 2000s, with India a prime location for service delivery. The scale of expansion has resulted in a proliferation of non-standard and unethical practices that have, perversely, lead to increases in patient infertility. Senior Indian reproductive specialists seek to generate their own ‘reproductive empires’ by further expanding service provision into emerging markets such as Africa, the Middle East and Latin America. This talk explores these new empires and their political and economic drivers: the neoliberalism of health service provision in India; the privatisation and corporatisation of care; gendered competitiveness; and cultural preferences for biologically related children.







    Bronwyn Parry, King’s College London







    Bronwyn Parry is Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine and Head of the School of Global Affairs at Kings College London. Bronwyn is interested in the social, ethical and legal implications of transforming human tissues and DNA into bio-information that can be circulated across multiple platforms and into multiple markets simultaneously. Her books Trading the Genome: Investigating the Commodification of Bio-information (2004) and Bio-Information (2017) investigate the emergence of new global economies in bioinformation, revealing how tissue samples and DNA segue into and out of the commodity form at different moments and places in their careers.

    • 1 hr 17 min
    Putting Mining in its Place: Mining and Community Resistance in Canada

    Putting Mining in its Place: Mining and Community Resistance in Canada

    Date: November 21, 2019Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214Time: 1:00 PM – 2:30 PMSpeaker:  Joan Kuyek







    Joan Kuyek has decades of experience helping to protect Canadian communities from the negative impacts of the mining industry. She will briefly share what she learned: how the Canadian industry is structured, how it maintains power, and how affected communities resist whether they want to stop a mine before it starts, to force governments to protect them, or to get an abandoned mine cleaned-up.

    • 1 hr 17 min
    The Canadian Federal Election: What Just Happened?

    The Canadian Federal Election: What Just Happened?

    Date: October 31, 2019Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214Time: 1:00 PM – 2:30 PMSpeaker:  Georgina Riel, Hugh Segal, Kyla Tienhaara, and Colin Grey, chaired by Jonathan Rose







    This episode is a recording of the October 31st 2019 SNID post-election panel analyzing the 2019 Canadian federal election. The panel featured Georgina Riel, (Kingston political commentator), Hugh Segal (Queen’s School of Policy Studies), Kyla Tienhaara (Global Development Studies, environmental specialist), and Colin Grey (Queen’s Law School, immigration law specialist), and was chaired by Jonathan Rose (Queen’s Department of Political Studies). 

    • 1 hr 6 min
    Financialization, Securitization and the ‘War’ on Caribbean Remittances

    Financialization, Securitization and the ‘War’ on Caribbean Remittances

    Date of Lecture: November 14, 2019; Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214; Time: 1:00 PM – 2:30; PM Speaker: Beverley Mullings, Queen’s University. Across the Caribbean diaspora remittances are a faithful source of capital that has been a vital social safety net and source of local economic investment for many individuals and communities. But recent efforts by governments to leverage control over these flows of financial capital threaten this lifeline in ways that constitute a ‘war’ on remittances. The growing interest of states, international organizations and financial investors in Caribbean remittance economies reflects an emerging mode of governance built upon the logics of financializaton that is blurring the relationship between finance and security. In this talk, I examine the impulses behind this emerging regulatory infrastructure by identifying the strategies, regulations and procedures at work in an emerging financialization/securitization nexus that is reinvigorating new forms of coloniality, imperial control and abandonment in the Caribbean.







    About the Speaker:  Beverley Mullings, Queen’s University







    Beverley Mullings is a professor in the Department of Geography and Planning at Queen’s. Her research is located within the field of feminist political economy and engages questions of labour, social transformation, neoliberalism, and the politics of gender, race and class in the Caribbean and its diaspora. She is interested in the long-term effects of neoliberalization in the Caribbean on the ways that citizenship and belonging is imagined, and on the ways that social justice is articulated, particularly within work regimes. Her work has been published in Global Networks, Antipode, and Small Axe, among other journals and edited collections.

    • 55 min
    We Are the Caretakers of Our Water

    We Are the Caretakers of Our Water

    Date of Lecture: October 17, 2019Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214Time: 1:00 PM – 2:30 PMSpeaker:  Poh-Gek Forkert, Queen’s University







    A small rural community and a nearby First Nations community combined forces to fight a proposal to expand a local dumpsite into a mega-landfill – a project with a high potential to pollute their water. It was a pitched battle that started in 1985 and lasted for decades. They encountered many obstacles – some from their own government –as they fought together to protect their water. In 2006, the government terminated the proposed expansion. It looks tentatively like the battle has been won but to this day water contamination issues remained unresolved.







    About the Speaker: Poh-Gek Forkert, Queen’s University







    Poh-Gek Forkert came to Queen’s in 1982 after postdoctoral training in the United States. She is a research scientist and toxicologist who has published more than eighty papers and book chapters on the disposition and metabolism of toxic chemicals. For the past ten years, she has worked as an expert consultant with environmental lawyers and citizen groups and has testified at public hearings of the Environmental Review Tribunal. She is Professor Emerita at Queen’s University. Her book Fighting Dirty has recently been shortlisted for the Speaker’s Book Prize.

    • 38 min

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