165 episodes

The Cinephiliacs is a podcast exploring the past and future of cinephelia. Film critic Peter Labuza has interviewed critics, programmers, academics, filmmakers, and more about their relationship to film and film culture. Additionally, each guest will bring in a particular favorite film and discuss it with Labuza. Indiewire declares, "If you want to hear film critics talk at length about their craft, there are few better places on the Internet" and Keyframe Daily has called it "Exhibit A" for the future of film culture

The Cinephiliacs Peter Labuza

    • Film History
    • 4.1, 8 Ratings

The Cinephiliacs is a podcast exploring the past and future of cinephelia. Film critic Peter Labuza has interviewed critics, programmers, academics, filmmakers, and more about their relationship to film and film culture. Additionally, each guest will bring in a particular favorite film and discuss it with Labuza. Indiewire declares, "If you want to hear film critics talk at length about their craft, there are few better places on the Internet" and Keyframe Daily has called it "Exhibit A" for the future of film culture

    TC #123 - James Leo Cahill (Pom Poko)

    TC #123 - James Leo Cahill (Pom Poko)

    As a constant Instagram user, I find it hard not to love the numerous videos of mammals and other species in behavior whose response always comes down to "they're just like us!" But what about that history of cinema that shows us how animals are not like us, and perhaps encourages us to think outside our own worldview. In Zoological Surrealism, University of Toronto professor James Leo Cahill explores the wondrously strange history of filmmaker Jean Painlevé, best known for his documentary The Seahorse, and explores the numerous scientific films and how he and his collaborators essentially embraced a different worldview by merging art and science. In this long ranging history, James takes us through his first fascinations with cinema and animals as well as through the numerous unique theories he develops through tracing a transhistorical understanding of Painlevé. Finally, the two embrace every emotion through examining Pom Poko, a curious anime from Studio Ghibli that traces the last years of a dying species and celebrates the way we feel loss....a film quite appropriate for our current moment.
    0:00–7:10 Opening
    7:54-13:05 MUBI Sponsorship
    13:50–1:32:30 Deep Focus — James Leo Cahill
    1:34:35–1:37:35 OVID.TV Sponsorship Section
    1:38:21–1:54:08 Double Exposure — Pom Poko (Isao Takahata)
    1:54:56–1:56:51 Close 

    • 1 hr 56 min
    TC #122 - Marie-Louise Khondji (Birth)

    TC #122 - Marie-Louise Khondji (Birth)

    Nothing is more frustrating in our streaming era than turning on any specific app and suddenly staring hundreds of movie posters with only an algorithm trying to decide what you might like (especially if such product is actually made by the company to help its margins). But what if there was a streaming site that only offered a single movie a week, and maybe not even a feature but a short or medium-length feature? And what if it had circulated ultra-rare films by Claire Denis, Hong Sang-Soo, Matias Piñeiro, Jonas Mekas, and fascinating filmmakers you had never heard of? That's the promise Marie-Louise Khondji has brought to her site Le Cinéma Club. Marie sits down to talk about growing up with her father (the cinematographer Darius) and how she moved into management through distribution and production before starting a site to help filmmakers showcase work that needed an outlet and created to be accessible for all. Finally, the two talk about the wonderful Jonathan Glazer film Birth, and how it seems to capture a certain timeless stasis of its upper elite New York culture.
    0:00–6:27 Opening
    7:40-11:32 OVID.TV Sponsorship
    12:17–45:51 Deep Focus — Marie-Louise Khondji
    46:40–51:15 MUBI Sponsorship Section
    52:31–1:03:47 Double Exposure — Birth (Jonathan Glazer)
    1:04:12–1:06:42 Close 

    • 1 hr 6 min
    TC #121 - Jon Dieringer (Made in Hollywood)

    TC #121 - Jon Dieringer (Made in Hollywood)

    The podcast returns in our perilous times with a profile of the website all about what's playing in repertory and experimental cinemas across New York. And though the balconies remained closed and the popcorn machines without an ounce, there are plenty of reason to subscribe to Screen Slate and listen to this conversation with Jon Dieringer. Jon takes us to his early programming days and work on a few Hollywood movies before diving into the complex work preserving the history of experimental video at Electronic Arts Intermix. He then talks about the origins of Screen Slate (including its infamous and now defunct competitor) and how it continues to push the boundaries of what curious cinephiles can and should watch. Finally, the two dive into the absolute oddity that is Made in Hollywood, a proto-Lynch take on the industry from Bruce and Norman Yonemoto with Patricia Arquette that is both highly artificial and highly bizarre. 
    0:00–6:18 Opening
    7:27-10:43 OVID.TV Sponsorship
    11:28–1:20:21 Deep Focus — Jon Dieringer
    1:21:32–1:24:57 MUBI Sponsorship Section
    1:25:37–1:40:32 Double Exposure — Made in Hollywood (Bruce and Norman Yonemoto)
    1:40:36–1:42:33 Close // Outtake

    • 1 hr 42 min
    TC #120 - Alison Kozberg (Nowhere)

    TC #120 - Alison Kozberg (Nowhere)

    If cinema enters what might be its 100th identity crisis since its birth, there is at least a more appropriate question to ask: where will cinema take place? As the first guest of 2020, Peter brings in Art House Convergence director Alison Kozberg to tackle how the art house scene has changed less in Los Angeles and New York but instead transformed cities like Tuscon and Charleston. Alison charts her life as a repertory-goer in the 1990s to learning the tricks of programming for both classic Hollywood and experimental works in places like Minneapolis, Boston, and South Carolina. She then looks at the new challenges—but more so, opportunities—for art houses to engage and create new community spaces. Finally, the two dive back into her teen years to examine Gregg Araki's apocalyptic teenage satire Nowhere, which Alison argues as a rare breakthrough film of the time to openly accept queer identities as normative.
    0:00–5:06 Opening
    5:52–51:11 Deep Focus — Alison Kozberg
    52:28–57:34 Sponsorship Section
    58:57–1:17:03 Double Exposure — Nowhere (Gregg Araki)
    1:17:28–1:19:21 Close

    • 1 hr 19 min
    TC #119 - Racquel Gates (White Chicks)

    TC #119 - Racquel Gates (White Chicks)

    In some regards, cinephilia often defines itself in knowing what is good from what is bad, highlighting the rarity of intention and execution in a select few texts from the rest of the trash. But what about those supposedly bad films? Do they not offer insight into our culture as well? In Double Negative, Associate Professor Racquel Gates explores the supposed bad mirror image of black cinema and television from the 1980s and beyond. Looking at a set of nearly forgotten works, Gates examines how these texts reveal insights into black popular culture often ignored by the mainstream. As Peter and Racquel discuss, these texts often aim to show a slice of American life what is usually acceptable in white popular culture—if only simply showing suburban middle-class life. In their final segment, they dissect the topic of whiteness with the 2004 Wayans Brother flick White Chicks, a very silly film with a very insightful dissection of privilege and femininity, as well as absolute sheer gross-out humor. 
    0:00–3:03 Opening
    3:41–11:37 Establishing Shots — At the Mill Valley Film Festival
    12:23–49:33 Deep Focus — Racquel Gates
    50:52–54:23 Sponsorship Section
    55:33–1:06:04 Double Exposure — White Chicks (Keenen Ivory Wayans)
    1:06:25–1:08:17 Close / Outtake

    • 1 hr 8 min
    TC #118 - Daniel Steinhart (Bunny Lake Is Missing)

    TC #118 - Daniel Steinhart (Bunny Lake Is Missing)

    As much as many will espouse the "universal language" of cinema, the experience of both making and watching films from location to location is full of fascinating difference. As someone who grew up watching films in both America and Colombia, Daniel Steinhart became attuned to look for these differences as he traveled film festivals as well. But his book, Runaway Hollywood, moves from the audience to the filmmakers who escaped the studio lot and made works across the globe in the postwar era. Peter and Dan discuss this fascinating taxonomy of taxes and tea, gaffers and genre, politics and panning shots. How exactly could this cultural exchange create a change in film style? Finally, they dive into an oddball thriller from Otto Preminger shot in London, Bunny Lake Is Missing, examining how this film balances both its unique locale and the demands of its auteur.
    0:00–3:28 Opening
    5:11–12:52 Establishing Shots — Gilberto Perez's The Eloquent Screen
    13:37–1:07:22 Deep Focus — Daniel Steinhart
    1:08:06–1:11:33 Sponsorship Section
    1:12:52–1:33:02 Double Exposure — Bunny Lake Is Missing (Otto Preminger)
    1:33:07–1:35:50 Close
     

    • 1 hr 35 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
8 Ratings

8 Ratings

davidd329 ,

A great podcast for film lovers!

A interesting and lively podcast that gathers unique film critics, from New York and elsewhere in the States, to discuss their cinephilia and do a close reading on one film. The host Peter Labuza is friendly and has an encyclopedic knowledge of cinema. This lengthy podcast is a great listen for anyone interested in movies.

Drugpunk ,

Cinema = Dreams = Life = Cinema

Great podcast for those who love movies - and who loves movies more than anyone? Well, cinephiliacs, of course. And who are some of the best cinephiliacs? Film critics, of course. Great film critics make movies more exciting and their writing is an art form in itself, so it's great to hear a little more how these incisive minds have developed and operate vis-a-vis the world of cinema.

Top Podcasts In Film History

Listeners Also Subscribed To