135 episodes

Context is everything. Join us Monday to Friday for a podcast from The Globe and Mail newsroom. Explore a story shaping our world, in conversation with reporters, experts, and the people at the centre of the news.

The Decibel The Globe and Mail

    • News
    • 4.3 • 429 Ratings

Context is everything. Join us Monday to Friday for a podcast from The Globe and Mail newsroom. Explore a story shaping our world, in conversation with reporters, experts, and the people at the centre of the news.

    What’s stopping people from buying cannabis-infused drinks

    What’s stopping people from buying cannabis-infused drinks

    Many producers and investors had high expectations that cannabis-infused drinks would offer new and existing users a new way to get high. Some predicted hundreds of millions of dollars in annual sales from this type of product. But so far, reality hasn’t lived up to the hype, as THC drinks struggled to break into an extremely competitive and regulated market with only mellow sales.

    The Globe’s business reporter Irene Galea looks into what those problems are and what they could mean for the future of the industry.

    • 14 min
    The unsolved mystery of vandalism at movie theatres in Ontario

    The unsolved mystery of vandalism at movie theatres in Ontario

    Last week, two Cineplex movie theatres in Richmond Hill and Oakville Ontario were vandalized. Both theatres were showing the South Indian film, Kurup, and had multiple screens slashed. The mysterious incident is not the first time South Indian movie screenings have been targeted. It’s something that’s been happening since 2015.

    Joe Castaldo is a reporter for the Report on Business at The Globe. He explains what exactly has been going on and what some people in the industry think might be behind the incidents.

    • 15 min
    The flooding and rebuilding of B.C.'s farms

    The flooding and rebuilding of B.C.'s farms

    The floods in British Columbia’s Fraser Valley have left much of the area in ruin. One community that has been particularly hard hit is farmers. Damage to farms in the area – which supply about half of B.C.’s eggs, dairy and poultry – has been catastrophic. Thousands of animals have died and many of the properties remain underwater.

    The Globe’s Andrea Woo describes her experience on the ground in Abbotsford, B.C. Then Ann Hui, The Globe’s national food reporter, explains what impact this will have on the food supply and why it could take a long time before these farms are back up and running.

    • 14 min
    Infighting in the Conservative Party as Parliament resumes

    Infighting in the Conservative Party as Parliament resumes

    • 16 min
    What Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai’s disappearance means for the Beijing Olympics

    What Chinese tennis player Peng Shuai’s disappearance means for the Beijing Olympics

    Chinese tennis star Peng Shuai disappeared from the public eye after accusing the former vice-premier of China of sexually assaulting her. The accusation was wiped from her Weibo account within an hour.

    Nothing much happened until tennis stars like Naomi Osaka and Billie Jean King, along with international media and the Women’s Tennis Association, began asking where Peng went a few weeks later. Then a message allegedly from Peng appeared, followed by a video purportedly showing her safely out at dinner. This didn’t convince everyone of her safety or that her allegations were being taken seriously by Chinese authorities.

    But, as Globe sports columnist Cathal Kelly argues, it was enough to kill the news story and to quiet calls for boycotting the upcoming Beijing Olympics.

    • 15 min
    How Tik Tok made spotting intimate partner violence go viral

    How Tik Tok made spotting intimate partner violence go viral

    Gender-based violence often doesn’t get reported to authorities, and the signs that someone might need help are easily missed by friends, family and even the person experiencing the abuse. But a hand signal created for people to silently ask for help recently went viral on Tik Tok – and was used by a missing teen who ended up getting rescued in Kentucky.

    Elizabeth Renzetti is a columnist and feature writer at The Globe who often covers issues around gender-based violence. She explains how the hand signal came to be, why it matters that it went viral on Tik Tok and what we need to know about the more subtle signs of abuse that often go overlooked.

    • 15 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
429 Ratings

429 Ratings

BlueBernie ,

Great host!

I haven’t been listening long enough to comment on overall content - but Tamara is an excellent host. Her questions are concise and pertinent. She’s clearly prepared but doesn’t feel the need to sound like the expert. So many journalists tend to want to carry the ball with long-winded, biased questions. Tamara is a breath of fresh air.

Finch.86- ,

Uncritical

I have listened to almost every episode since the podcast started. I enjoy the content and find it covers a good range of topics. However as others have said the presenters are often totally unquestioning of the issues put forward, as such it tends to be very one sided. In today's episode there was no mention at all of the question over whether supply management might be bad for Canadian consumers. Maybe Canadians want cheaper dairy, maybe they want US imports. I don't know, but it's a shame that some of these deeper questions are never explored.

SnoCrab07 ,

Sounding good

I enjoy this podcast, especially the shows that feature Globe reporters and columnists. I think it could be refined and boosted with a little more production, like audio stings, and avoiding phone calls. Definitely worth seeking out a solution to get studio quality audio as much as possible. Great work.

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