10 episodes

The First Aid Show is an online TV series which looks at all things first aid, medical and safety. In this show, we’ll be speaking to medical professionals, re-living real-life scenarios and offering practical advice on the prevention of accidents, treatment of injuries and how you and those around you can keep safe.

The First Aid Show Keith Sleightholm

    • Health & Fitness

The First Aid Show is an online TV series which looks at all things first aid, medical and safety. In this show, we’ll be speaking to medical professionals, re-living real-life scenarios and offering practical advice on the prevention of accidents, treatment of injuries and how you and those around you can keep safe.

    • video
    CPR Wrap

    CPR Wrap

    Welcome to this edition of The First Aid Show. Now one of the reasons people don’t want to do CPR is one of the fears, and is the fear of infection. And also the fear of touching somebody or something which could be unpleasant, like vomit. You can get face shields and you can wear gloves but one of the other fears you have is actually not remembering what to do. Now if you are a qualified first aider, then hopefully you would be able to remember how to do CPR. However the CPR Wrap was brought out to give a direct 1, 2, 3, 4, reminder printed on a protection device that helps guide you through the CPR process.

    CPR Wrap

    Now if you are not CPR trained, the idea is you could pick one of these up, open the packet up and work through the whole process quite simply, just with a bit of basic common sense and knowledge. The CPR wrap is available in 3 sizes. We have got the Adult, Child and Infant sizes. The only difference between them is the guidance that is actually on it and also the size of it. And the infant one has a different type of valve because of the way of the infant when doing CPR. Now with the unit itself, what you do is come to the cardboard box, just open up, pull out

    the sachet, and on the back you have got some clear instruction for exactly what to do. 1 Check the scene. 2 Call the Emergency Services. 3 Align it, so actually pop it where you need it, and follow the instructions. So its quite an easy process.

    So all you do with there, there are a couple of little nicks on each end, tear it open. Once it is open you can pull the CPR Wrap out and if you just undo it, you can see that there are 2 main parts to it: The body, and also the mouthpiece. You can see that the plastic is a very good quality plastic and you can see that the actual plastic itself will protect you from any potential infection that could be on their clothing if there’s any blood or vomit there. And it covers quite a large area.

    Key Aims of the CPR Wrap

    But the key thing with CPR Wrap is it gives you instruction. Right here at the beginning, it says here number 1. Position where it needs to be. So you position this directly onto the chest. The second one is doing chest compressions. So the CPR Wrap will assume you have done a breathing check and you know that this person is not breathing. Therefore you must start CPR. So it tells you exactly where to place your hands and it tells you how long to push down for. The next one here, it says push down the depth, so you are pushing down 5-6 centimetres and release, so it is telling you the importance of compressions and also the release, and it tells you to do 30 compressions. The fourth section is where you have got the mouthpiece. So you can pop that into their mouth, you can squeeze their nose and you can deliver two breaths. And then it says repeat the cycle.

    So it is a very simple 1, 2, 3, 4, process. And the hope is someone with virtually no training or very limited amounts of training could pick up one of these them is that they are much better than the conventional face shield for the untrained person because they are one unit. They are big, they cover the chest and they also give good instruction.

    CPR Wrap is ideal to be used in a possible case of Coronavirus.

    For more information on training courses, visit our “Courses” page which also includes our First Responder and First Person on Scene (FPOS) Courses.

    • 3 min
    • video
    What is urinalysis?

    What is urinalysis?

    The kidneys are the bodies way of removing waste materials, fluids and other substances from the body.  By testing a patients urine it can give valuable clues as to possible problems that patient may have or it can rule out other possible problems.

    When we test urine, this is called Urinalysis.

    Urinalysis can be simply done by the use of urine test strips. Urinalysis is carried out when there is a problem but also as routine checks. Urinalysis is also used to check other substances in the urine like legal or illegal drugs and even if the person is pregnant.

    The results of Urinalysis are affected by the person’s diet, the medicines they are on, dehydration and many other factors. When samples are taken, it is often required for additional tests so that a good average result can be calculated over a period of time. This will avoid jumping to conclusions with a single test when one result could have been affected by another factor.

    The indication of proteins or glucose in the urine may show before the patient is aware of any problem. High levels of glucose in the urine is a sign of potential diabetes. Persistent protein in the urine, over several weeks of tests is one of the earliest signs of chronic kidney disease.

    If bacterial or white blood cells are found this could be a sign of a urinary tract infection.

    You can find out more about an array of first aid and medical subjects on one of our video online courses at https://www.protrainings.uk/courses

    • 1 min
    • video
    Coronavirus and Horses and Livestock – advice for people with horses and livestock

    Coronavirus and Horses and Livestock – advice for people with horses and livestock

    Coronavirus and horses, livestock or other animals you obviously need to care for them during the Coronavirus outbreak. There are two types of advice given. One if you have symptoms and the other if you do not have symptoms.

    The advice if you have symptoms of coronavirus and must remain at home for 7 days, or 14 as a household.  If you have a horse in livery, you must not visit them whilst you are self-isolating. You should contact your yard manager or vet to make suitable welfare arrangements.

    If you have livestock such as cattle, sheep, goats, pigs, poultry, or any other types of livestock you should arrange for someone else who is not self-isolating to care for your animals.

    Where this is not possible you should ensure the basic needs of your animals are met. You must make sure you wash your hands before and after handling your animals and ensure you remain 2 metres away from other people.

    If you are too unwell to care for your animals and there is no one to help, you should call your local authority.

    Advice if you do not have symptoms of coronavirus is that You may leave your house to exercise once a day and you should combine this with leaving your house to provide care for your horse or livestock.

    It is essential that you minimise the time spent outside of the home and remain 2 metres away from others. You should remember to wash your hands before and after contact with any animals.

    If your horse requires urgent attention from a farrier, you should phone the farrier to arrange the best approach to meet your horses’ needs. You and the farrier must ensure that you keep 2 metres apart and wash your hands before and after contact with the horse.

    We will keep our websites as up to date as possible. If you would like to learn more about pet first aid we have a range of pet first aid courses from standard, advanced and professional levels and dog and cat care video online courses. For more information visit our pet first aid website at propetfirstaid.co.uk.

    • 2 min
    • video
    How did Coronavirus start

    How did Coronavirus start

    One question often asked is how did Coronavirus start? The Coronavirus originated in Wuhan, China and as of the 30th of January 2020, the World Health Organisation declared it a global emergency. COVID-19 is rapidly spreading around the world, and the number of those countries infected is continuing to rise.

    Signs and symptoms of the virus are similar to those of the flu, such as fever, severe coughing and shortness of breath. If Coronavirus is suspected, the patient must be isolated. This also means that if you come in to contact with someone suspected of having the virus, you must also isolate yourself, and any contact that may need to be made should be done by telephone, not face to face.

    This is based on the information we have as of early February 2020, so please keep yourself updated on the current news. Viruses like these can mutate and situations can quickly change, so be sure to follow the most up-to-date guidelines.

    For more details on the Coronavirus outbreak, watch the full Coronavirus course for FREE at: www.ProCoronavirus.co.uk

    • 2 min
    • video
    Coronavirus advice – what you should do?

    Coronavirus advice – what you should do?

    Coronavirus COVID-19 is rapidly spreading around the world, and although there is a lot still to learn about the virus, the advice to slow down the spread of the virus is pretty clear.

    So, how can you help to slow down the spread of Coronavirus?  

    • Stay at home – this means no unnecessary journeys or social contact.

    • Only leave the house for essential shopping, medical needs, and exercise once a day.

    • You can only travel to and from work but only if it is absolutely necessary.

    • Any social gatherings of more than two people is banned. This, however, does not apply to people you live with.

    • You should not visit other people’s houses or socialise with anyone outside your house.

    • If you start to develop any symptoms, you must isolate yourself, and your family.

    • And finally, rather than face to face contact, keep in touch with any family and friends with regular phone calls, video chats, or texting.  If you do not follow the rules, the police can fine you!

    So what day you need to do to avoid Coronavirus?

    • You should be thoroughly cleaning your hands, and the World Health Organisation recommends that the handwashing process should take around 20 to 30 seconds minimum.

    • Catch coughs and sneezes with disposable tissues and dispose of them correctly as soon as they are used.

    • If you do not have a tissue, use your sleeve. Once you have sneezed or coughed, wash your hands thoroughly or use an alcohol hand gel.

    • And finally, avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands – this is how the virus gets into your body.

    The main symptoms of Coronavirus include fever and tiredness, a continuous cough and breathing difficulties. The current rule is if you live with someone who has a new continuous cough or high temperature, you should stay at home for 14 days in case any symptoms develop. Where possible, you should stay at least three steps away from other people in your house.

    If your symptoms appear to get worse or do not get any better after seven days, please seek medical advice. Use the online 111 Coronavirus service at https://111.nhs.uk. In Northern Ireland, call 111. If they deem it necessary, you may be tested for the virus at a hospital.

    • 2 min
    • video
    Face masks and Coronavirus – FFP1 FFP2 and FFP3

    Face masks and Coronavirus – FFP1 FFP2 and FFP3

    There are different types of face mask and Coranvirus considerations. There are three main types of Filtering Face Piece (FFP) masks: FFP1, FFP2, and FFP3. These types are mainly used in industries for the protection against airborne particles. There should be CE marked to show that the design has been tested to a recognised standard. They must also be marked with that standard, which for disposable respirators, the standard is EN 149: 2001.

    The additional markings, such as FFP1, FFP2, and FFP3 indicate the protection level available if you use it correctly. In response to Coronavirus COVID-19, the FFP3 mask will provide the best level of protection, though there are no guarantees that they will protect you.

    Always carry out a pre-use check before you put on a mask, check that it fits according to manufacturer’s instructions, and test it for effectiveness with a simple breath test. Readjust the respirator if you detect any leakage around your face.

    For more details on the Coronavirus outbreak, watch the full Coronavirus course for FREE at: www.ProCoronavirus.co.uk

    • 2 min

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