193 épisodes

Expert insight on health, performance, longevity, critical thinking, and pursuing excellence. Dr. Peter Attia (Stanford/Hopkins/NIH-trained MD) talks with leaders in their fields.

The Peter Attia Driv‪e‬ Peter Attia, MD

    • Médecine
    • 4.7 • 534 notes

Expert insight on health, performance, longevity, critical thinking, and pursuing excellence. Dr. Peter Attia (Stanford/Hopkins/NIH-trained MD) talks with leaders in their fields.

    AMA #22: Losing fat and gaining fat: the lessons of fat flux

    AMA #22: Losing fat and gaining fat: the lessons of fat flux

    In this “Ask Me Anything” (AMA) episode, Peter and Bob take a deep dive into fat flux. They define the major players that impact the flow of fat entering and exiting a fat cell, which determines how much fat a person carries. They discuss the significant influence that insulin has on the net fat balance and explore common strategies, such as fasting and low-carb diets, that have efficacy in the liberation and oxidation of fat from fat cells. Additionally, Bob explains his research process and how he seeks answers to Peter’s challenging questions.

     
    If you’re not a subscriber and listening on a podcast player, you’ll only be able to hear a preview of the AMA. If you’re a subscriber, you can now listen to this full episode on your private RSS feed or on our website at the AMA #22 show notes page. If you are not a subscriber, you can learn more about the subscriber benefits here.
     
    We discuss:
    The two main ways to reduce fat mass (1:30); Explaining fat flux—how fat enters and exits a fat cell (9:15); What fat balance looks like (21:15); What net fat influx looks like, and the impact of insulin in lipolysis (24:30); What net fat efflux looks like, and the benefits of fasting to break the hyperinsulinemic cycle (28:30); Exploring why most people with excess body fat will lose fat mass when reducing carbohydrates or eating a ketogenic diet (32:45); Why being in nutritional ketosis does not automatically translate to negative fat flux (fat loss) (42:40); Bob’s approach to scientific research (47:00); The importance of curiosity and a desire to learn (58:30); Bob’s tips and tricks for answering a scientific question in a time-crunch (1:00:00); and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/

    Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/ama22/ 

    Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/

    Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/

    Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.

    • 15 min
    Jake Muise: Humanely harvesting axis deer while alleviating its impact on Hawaii’s vulnerable ecosystems

    Jake Muise: Humanely harvesting axis deer while alleviating its impact on Hawaii’s vulnerable ecosystems

    Jake Muise is an avid hunter, environmentalist, and advocate for the preservation of Hawaii’s natural resources. He is the founder of Maui Nui Venison, a company which actively manages Hawaii’s imbalanced population of axis deer by harvesting them as a food resource. In this episode, Jake tells his unbelievable backstory growing up in Northern Alberta before landing in Hawaii on a volleyball scholarship where he fell in love with the islands and the people. Jake explains how axis deer—a non-native species—were brought to the islands and how they have since become imbalanced to the detriment of Hawaii’s precious ecosystems. He goes on to explain the incredible lengths that his company has taken to ensure the most humane harvesting techniques imaginable resulting in a food source that is as clean and healthful as can be. Additionally, Jake and Peter examine what makes meat from axis deer one of the most nutrient-dense red meats on the planet.
     

    We discuss:
    Upbringing in Northern Alberta, a diet of moose meat, and learning to surf in Nova Scotia (3:35); How volleyball brought Jake to Hawaii where he met the Molokai people (14:00); Jake’s introduction to axis deer (26:30); Pro volleyball in Europe, missing the Olympic team by one spot, and his return to Hawaii (29:00); History of axis deer in Hawaii—how a non-native species came to the islands, and the superpowers that make them so hard to hunt (34:00); A potential catastrophe avoided on The Big Island—The amazing story of how Jake tracked and found axis deer that were secretly brought to The Big Island (52:15); Jake’s work helping ranchers on Maui (1:08:15); The detrimental impact of an imbalanced axis deer population (1:10:30); The incredible evacuation of farm animals from lava-locked land due to a volcano eruption (1:17:00); The creation of Maui Nui Venison—going above and beyond USDA requirements (1:27:00); The most humane way to harvest an animal—the unmatched standards Maui Nui Venison uses to harvest axis deer (1:32:00); Why meat from axis deer is nutritionally superior (and tastes better) than other meats (1:46:00); Why axis deer meat is the best option for those reluctant to eat meat: True nose-to-tail nutrition and ethical harvesting (1:58:15); What a truly balanced population of axis deer on Hawaii would look like (2:06:15); Maui Nui Venison’s charitable work during the COVID crisis (2:12:45); and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/

    Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/jakemuise

    Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/

    Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/

    Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.

    • 2 heures 19 min
    Chris Sonnenday, M.D.: The history, challenges, and gift of organ transplantation

    Chris Sonnenday, M.D.: The history, challenges, and gift of organ transplantation

    Chris Sonnenday is the Transplant Center Director for Michigan Medicine. As Peter’s senior resident while at Johns Hopkins, Chris made a lasting impression on him with his remarkable leadership and ability to maintain his humanity through the stressors of that challenging environment. In this episode, Chris tells the incredible backstory of the history of transplant medicine, focusing on the kidney and the liver. He discusses the surgical and immunologic developments that launched the field forward, but also lays out the challenges ahead for the field, such as the rising prevalence of chronic kidney and liver failure. Chris also tells many stories of tragedy and triumph that comes with working in organ transplantation, but ultimately explains the rewarding nature of being a witness to the gift of organ donation.
     
    We discuss:
    What attracted Chris to medicine, and his leadership in residency (3:30); How Chris maintained his empathy and humanity through the stresses of med school and residency (8:30); Why Chris chose a complicated field like transplant medicine (23:15); Explaining kidney transplantation to showcase the challenge of organ transplantation surgery (28:00); Overcoming the immune-based challenges of transplant surgery (37:00); How the discovery of cyclosporine transformed the field of organ transplantation (49:00); Rising chronic kidney failure due to the prevalence of pre-diabetes and metabolic syndrome (53:45); Why living kidney donations are superior, and the possibility of a market for kidney donation (59:30); Designing a fair system of organ distribution (1:17:30); The debate on what constitutes “death” when deciding when to take organs from a registered organ donor (1:21:45); Reflections on the gift of organ donation (1:33:15); The history of liver transplantation and why it’s so complex (1:39:15); Addressing acute liver failure and the amazing baboon experiment (1:46:15); The potential for the rising prevalence of NAFLD and NASH to overwhelm the liver transplant infrastructure in the US (1:54:45); The importance of teamwork in successful organ transplantations, and the most tragic event Chris has ever witnessed (2:05:45); and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/

    Show notes page for this episode: http://peterattiamd.com/ChrisSonnenday

    Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/

    Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/

    Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.

    • 2 heures 14 min
    Steve Levitt, Ph.D.: A rogue economist’s view on climate change, mental health, the ethics of experiments, and more

    Steve Levitt, Ph.D.: A rogue economist’s view on climate change, mental health, the ethics of experiments, and more

    Steven Levitt is a professor of economics at the University of Chicago and the co-author of the bestselling book Freakonomics and its two sequels. In this episode, Steve discusses his unlikely path to a career in economics and his view of the current state, and limitations, of the field. He also gives his unique perspective on contemporary issues including climate change, mental health in education, how to evaluate whether an experiment is ethical, decision making, horse racing, and much more. 
     
    We discuss:

    How Steve ended up in economics (2:45); Current trends in the field of economics: macro vs. micro, usefulness of models, and the relationship between data and theory (8:45); Revisiting what Steve wrote about climate change in SuperFreakonomics, and why it’s unlikely to be solved with behavioral change (18:45); The consequences of a blurred line between climate science and advocacy (27:30); Answering climate questions with a “Manhattan Project for climate change” (31:45); Steve’s reflections on his career path and how he found his way by being himself (40:00); How Steve came to write Freakonomics (and its sequels), and the topics which caused the most controversy (53:00); How Steve came to appreciate mental health through parenting, and the need to emphasize mental health into the education system (1:10:15); Why people are bad at making decisions (1:26:45); Deliberating on why horse racing times haven’t advance much in decades (1:34:30); Reducing the impact of negative emotions by observing the world free of language (1:44:00); Changing our thinking about what it means to conduct experiments ethically (1:49:00); and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/

    Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/SteveLevitt 

    Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/

    Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/

    Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.

    • 2 heures
    AMA #21: Deep dive into olive oil, high-intensity exercise, book update, and more

    AMA #21: Deep dive into olive oil, high-intensity exercise, book update, and more

    In this “Ask Me Anything” (AMA) episode, Peter and Bob take a deep dive into olive oil. They explore the history of olive oil, discuss observational data that led to the hypothesis that olive oil is a healthier alternative to many other fats, and they explain the classification of olive oil types —including what to look for in a high-quality “extra virgin” olive oil. Peter and Bob round out the discussion with a “two-minute drill,” in which Peter answers questions from subscribers. They cover zone 5 training, an update on Peter’s book, lactate meters, standing desks, massage guns, electrolyte supplementation, and more. 
     
    If you’re not a subscriber and listening on a podcast player, you’ll only be able to hear a preview of the AMA. If you’re a subscriber, you can now listen to this full episode on your private RSS feed or on our website at the AMA #21 show notes page. If you are not a subscriber, you can learn more about the subscriber benefits here.
     
    We discuss:
    The early history of olive oil and the Mediterranean diet (2:15); The three broad categories of fats: SFA, MUFA, and PUFA (6:25); Exploring the hypothesis that olive oil is healthy (10:30); Comparing olive oil to the makeup of other common oils (30:00); Defining “extra virgin” olive oil, what to look for when purchasing, and Peter’s favorite brand (34:30); Update on Peter’s book (47:15); Zone 5 training: Peter's approach to zone 5 training, and other anaerobic training protocols (49:30); Advantages of using a standing desk compared to sitting (55:30); Lactate meters and strips (57:45); Electrolyte supplementation during fasting and ketosis, and why uric acid may increase (59:30); The usefulness of massage guns, foam rollers, and professional massage for muscle pain and tightness (1:01:30); and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/

    Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/ama21/ 

    Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/

    Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/

    Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.

    • 14 min
    Michael Rintala, D.C.: Principles of Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS)

    Michael Rintala, D.C.: Principles of Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS)

    Michael Rintala is a sports medicine chiropractor and one of only 18 international instructors teaching dynamic neuromuscular stabilization (DNS) for the Prague School of Rehabilitation. This episode focuses on understanding DNS, including the foundational principles and how it relates to human motor development. Michael also shares the most common injuries and issues he sees in patients in his practice, such as postural problems and back pain, and how the movements of a DNS program are used to avoid injury, maintain longevity, and improve sports performance.

    We discuss:
    Michael’s background in chiropractic sports medicine and rehabilitation (3:15); The Prague School of Rehabilitation, and functional rehabilitation as the foundation of the dynamic neuromuscular stabilization (DNS) program (5:00); Foundational principles of DNS, and the role of the diaphragm in muscular stability (19:00); Types of muscle contractions (28:15); Human motor development through the lens of DNS, and when issues begin to arise (32:30); Common postural syndromes (50:00); Increasing functional threshold to minimize time in the functional gap (56:45); DNS for injuries, pain, pre-habilitation, and performance enhancement (1:03:45); Etiology of back pain (1:10:00); How a stress fracture in his back led Michael to the Prague School (1:16:00); The Prague School curriculum: 3 tracks for certification in DNS (1:20:45); and More. Learn more: https://peterattiamd.com/

    Show notes page for this episode: https://peterattiamd.com/MichaelRintala/ 

    Subscribe to receive exclusive subscriber-only content: https://peterattiamd.com/subscribe/

    Sign up to receive Peter's email newsletter: https://peterattiamd.com/newsletter/

    Connect with Peter on Facebook | Twitter | Instagram.

    • 1h 35 min

Avis des utilisateurs

4.7 sur 5
534 notes

534 notes

Libbrary User ,

Makes me Think

Information is so valuable and the delve into vulnerability and emotional health is such a valuable part of longevity. I recommend this podcast to everyone in my life!!! Those that have taken me up on listening, love it as much as I do. It’s our weekly check-in now.

pikytr ,

John Barry 1918 podcast - Apr 17

John Barry, who apparently not a scientist, ignores all the facts available, reversed his own previous findings without any evidence and nonsensically says the Chinese (not the US) is responsible for the pandemic that happened 100 years ago.“Because there were very low incidents of it in China in 1918?? It’s lies like these that is fanning the wave of violent attacks on Asians.

mattyboy 89 ,

Great content but pricy

$19/month is a lot of money considering everything that is going on on the world. Peter attia has some great content but with the mass amount of amazing content that’s free it’s hard to justify the cost of Netflix for a single podcast

Palmarès des balados : Médecine

D’autres se sont aussi abonnés à…