29 episodes

On Triple Vision, hosts David Best and Hanna Leavitt bring you the history of Canadians who are blind, deafblind, and partially sighted, one story at a time, illuminating the challenges of the past, present, and future.

Triple Vision AMI-audio

    • Society & Culture
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

On Triple Vision, hosts David Best and Hanna Leavitt bring you the history of Canadians who are blind, deafblind, and partially sighted, one story at a time, illuminating the challenges of the past, present, and future.

    From Homer to Stevie Wonder: Two-and-a-Half Centuries of the Single Story

    From Homer to Stevie Wonder: Two-and-a-Half Centuries of the Single Story

    "In this episode the Triple Vision team continues its exploration of the danger of a single story by speaking with Dr. M. Leona Godin.

    Dr. Godin, who has taught literature and humanities at New York University, is a writer, performer and educator, lecturing on art, accessibility, technology, and disability. In this episode, she speaks with Peter Field and Hanna Leavitt about the themes emerging from her book, There Plant Eyes: A Personal and Cultural History of Blindness. She reflects on how some of the single stories of blindness over the past two-and-a-half centuries have led to myth, stereotyping and unbridled inspiration porn.

    ""I think the most obvious thing that I am pushing back on in my book is that the story of blindness in our literature, in our media, our films, and even from a journalistic perspective, has almost exclusively been told by sighted people. That is the No. 1 big issue, because I think that the ideas that sighted people have about blind people just don't make any sense in terms of our own lived experience.”

    Learn more about There Plant Eyes: A Personal and Cultural History of Blindness: https://drmlgodin.com/2021/05/there-plant-eyes-a-personal-and-cultural-history-of-blindness/"

    • 29 min
    The Danger of a Single Story

    The Danger of a Single Story

    In this episode the Triple Vision team takes a page from a Ted Talk by Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie called “The Danger of a Single story”. In her Talk the author relates what happens when someone else tells the story about another person or a community, and how much they can get that story wrong. Throughout the podcast you will hear the voices of the Triple Vision team, David Best, Sharlyn Ayotte, Peter Field and Hanna Leavitt discussing how the story regarding the community of Canadians who are blind and visually impaired has been told for years without them, and what the consequences of that are.

    “I was shocked by that. It was a story that had been generated for an awfully long time by the agency about who we were as blind people, dependent, helpless, terrified by everyday living. I couldn’t stay any longer because the story I knew about my friends and myself was that we were educated, self-determined, independent, skilled and talented.” The single story is a theme the Triple Vision team plans to return to often in its upcoming episodes.

    Resources:
    Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, The Danger of a Single Story (2009): https://www.ted.com/talks/chimamanda_ngozi_adichie_the_danger_of_a_single_story?language=en

    • 27 min
    The Triple Vision Podcast: Season 1 Round-up

    The Triple Vision Podcast: Season 1 Round-up

    "In this last episode of Triple Vision’s first season, the team of David, Hanna, Sharlyn and Peter look back at their first year of podcasting and some of their most memorable moments.

    From Professor Serge Durflinger talking about his book, “Veterans with a Vision,” in Episode 1, to colonialism, library services and several episodes dedicated to education and employment, the team recalls what they learne and what they are looking forward to next as they prepare for a second season.

    “I’m looking forward to a conversation that talks about how governance matters, and which narratives take priority when we are talking about ‘nothing about us without us,’ and how the current governance models are not working to support that perspective.”

    “The challenge that we have is that we’re such a small group that a lot of what we say gets overlooked. Even today, we see that a lot of the traditional ways of doing things lingers on. We have to try to figure out how we can shift that thought process; for example, today we depend on computers, technology, the iPhone, everything like that, and it makes a huge difference in our lives. But, for the most part, we are basically told what we need. We’re not given much opportunity to say, 'I am the end user and this is what I want. This is how I do things.'”"

    • 26 min
    The History of employment for Canadians who are Blind, Deafblind, and Partially Sighted: Part 4 – Do Employment programs Really Work?

    The History of employment for Canadians who are Blind, Deafblind, and Partially Sighted: Part 4 – Do Employment programs Really Work?

    In this last in a four-part series on employment, the Triple Vision team speaks to Jen Ferris and Wayne Henshall in order to answer the question: “Do employment programs for blind Canadians really work?”

    Jen Ferras is a "Free Agent" employed by the Government of Canada working on modernization initiatives; she has been working towards her own employment program for Canadians who are blind called “Talent Launch Consulting” on the side. The idea is to seek out gig work from established companies and then provide that work to qualified individuals looking to start their careers, or change their employment situation for the better. “What makes it unique is that it's well-established. It's legitimate companies requiring work to be done on their projects, and it's meaningful work. It’s not just tokenism.”

    Meanwhile, after 20 years in the corporate world, Wayne Henshall is now head of the Come to Work Program at CNIB. The program supports blind and visually impaired individuals moving along the continuum of vision loss through to the pursuit of work, careers and venture start-ups. The national program has grown from 30 participants in its first year, to now taking in 1,100. “The hard part is, how do you make the overall numbers change? We have such a high unemployment rate, it's three times the rate of the rest of Canada, and so I would say, are we making meaningful change? Two hundred and eighty of those 1,100 individuals have gotten jobs who had not been working for six months-plus, and in some cases had never worked, ever in their activities. So, that is a start. … Even if I got all 1,100 of those, that would only change the overall employment rate by less than .01%.”

    • 28 min
    Don't Give Me Shelter: Are we still sheltering? Part 3 of the history of employment for Canadians who are blind, deafblind and partially sighted

    Don't Give Me Shelter: Are we still sheltering? Part 3 of the history of employment for Canadians who are blind, deafblind and partially sighted

    "In this third episode covering the unemployment story for blind Canadians, the Triple Vision team speaks with city of Winnipeg Council Member Ross Eadie.

    We start by going all of the way back to Episode 5, called “Cane and Ableism,” when we spoke with Gord Hudek of Ambutech Corporation. Gord told us a fascinating anecdote about when he wanted to hire a individual who was blind in his factory. He was told by the CNIB that the workplace presented some safety concerns and that the person should probably not be hired. Peter asks Ross about this, as well as his life as a City of Winnipeg municipal Council Member - all to continue our exploration of the question, ""Why is the unemployment rate so high for Canadians who are blind, deaf blind, and partially sighted?”

    “The City of Winnipeg takes accessibility overall quite seriously, actually. Sometimes it may not seem like that but if you look at our transit system and you look at our streets system, tell me any major city in this country right now, give me a major city, that has every signalized intersection outfitted with an audible signal. Every intersection Isn’t perfect, but every intersection has that.… My wish is that we could find more employers, and this would really help the whole cross-disability perspective, more employers who would consider positions that are more specialized that could be filled.… Again, I still don’t know to what engineer I need to refer to, to get someone to look at Ambutech’s actual workplace and not see why not to employ a person who is blind, but look at how to employ somebody who is blind in that workplace.” "

    • 30 min
    Don’t Give me Shelter! Part 2 of the history of employment for Canadians who are blind, deafblind and partially sighted

    Don’t Give me Shelter! Part 2 of the history of employment for Canadians who are blind, deafblind and partially sighted

    "Today’s episode continues Triple Vision’s deep dive into the difficult questions surrounding the employment, and unemployment rates, of blind Canadians.

    The team pulls together three panelists to discuss the daunting issue of why the unemployment rate for Canadians who are blind, deafblind and partially sighted so chronically high. Vic Pereira, Marcia Yale and David Best all share their views on what has, and continues to, hold employers back from hiring individuals within the sight loss community. The panel covers issues like the lack of awareness by employers regarding the capabilities of individuals who are blind, technological trends that have both supported us and held us back, and attitudes in the workplace, amongst other issues.

    “One of the major challenges that we face is that we are always at the trailing end of progress. Through the 1900s, sheltered workshops were quite popular because they were opportunities for people who could not get into the workforce. However, we have shifted from the labour-based economy to the knowledge-based economy and the policies and procedures have not kept up with the progress of the world when it comes to the employment environments of workplace tools and transportation. I think the reason why we have always been behind with employment is we have been left behind when advancements are made. There’s no policy to include our needs as progress moves forward.”"

    • 31 min

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