26 min

Crisis in Caregiving White Coat, Black Art on CBC Radio

    • Science

Canada’s healthcare system is maxed out. In response, 8.1 million Canadians have stepped into the breach to care for ageing family members and loved ones who are chronically-ill or disabled. That allows many with complex care needs to remain in their homes longer. But it's taking a toll. Donna Thomson is a caregiver advocate and co-author of the new book "The Unexpected Journey of Caring." She says families are reaching a breaking point. "There's a big difference between shopping for your mother every once in a while and setting up tube feeds and ventilators. The type of nursing families are expected to take on today is unprecedented and there is no upper limit." She cared for her mother until she died at the age of 96 as well as her son, who has cerebral palsy. During this election many caregivers are calling for a national senior's strategy that recognizes the work caregivers do, and which offers them meaningful support. How politicians respond will sway their votes, says Dr. Samir Sinha. As the head of Geriatrics at Mount Sinai hospital in Toronto, he says we are in a crisis of caregiving. He's talks to Dr. Goldman about why caregiving needs to be a priority on the election agenda and what caregivers most need from their government.

Canada’s healthcare system is maxed out. In response, 8.1 million Canadians have stepped into the breach to care for ageing family members and loved ones who are chronically-ill or disabled. That allows many with complex care needs to remain in their homes longer. But it's taking a toll. Donna Thomson is a caregiver advocate and co-author of the new book "The Unexpected Journey of Caring." She says families are reaching a breaking point. "There's a big difference between shopping for your mother every once in a while and setting up tube feeds and ventilators. The type of nursing families are expected to take on today is unprecedented and there is no upper limit." She cared for her mother until she died at the age of 96 as well as her son, who has cerebral palsy. During this election many caregivers are calling for a national senior's strategy that recognizes the work caregivers do, and which offers them meaningful support. How politicians respond will sway their votes, says Dr. Samir Sinha. As the head of Geriatrics at Mount Sinai hospital in Toronto, he says we are in a crisis of caregiving. He's talks to Dr. Goldman about why caregiving needs to be a priority on the election agenda and what caregivers most need from their government.

26 min

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