143 episodes

This series of podcasts furthers the Champlain Society mission of deepening awareness of Canada’s documentary past and of the people who created it.

Witness to Yesterday (The Champlain Society Podcast on Canadian History‪)‬ The Champlain Society

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.8 • 39 Ratings

This series of podcasts furthers the Champlain Society mission of deepening awareness of Canada’s documentary past and of the people who created it.

    A history of place and family in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan

    A history of place and family in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan

    In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Robert Boschman on his new book White Coal City: A Memoir of Place & Family published by the University of Regina Press in 2021. Part memoir and part history, his book is a unique reflection on the continuing impact of past trauma, both familial and societal. Place is central in his account. Although Prince Albert (PA) is the focal point, the books describes the northcentral part of Saskatchewan, from Saskatoon to PA and the Mennonite and Indigenous communities in between and further north, and its difficult history of Indigenous-settler relations. Robert Boschman is currently professor and chair of the Department of English, Languages, and Culture at Mount Royal University in Calgary. He was the recipient of the Research Recognition Award from his university for his research output including White Coal City.

    • 31 min
    A History of the Métis Nation

    A History of the Métis Nation

    In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Indigenous rights litigator Jean Teillet on her book The Northwest is our Mother: The story of Louis Riel’s People, the Métis Nation published by Harper Collins in 2019. Covering the evolution of the Métis as a people and nation since the 1790s, Teillet presents us with an highly crafted epic narrative. The great-grandniece of Louis Riel, the author is a very well-known Indigenous rights litigator who has appeared in twelve separate cases before the Supreme Court of Canada. She is also a visual artist who has also worked as a writer, dancer, actor, choreographer, director and producer. Currently, she is Senior Counsel to the law firm Pape Salter Teillet.

    • 43 min
    The History and Impact of the New Left in Toronto

    The History and Impact of the New Left in Toronto

    In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Ian McKay on his co-authored book Radical Ambition: The New Left in Toronto published by Between the Lines Press in 2019. Co-authored with Peter Graham, Radical Ambition won the Floyd S. Chalmers Award in Ontario History, an award that is administered by the Champlain Society. Influenced by protests against the Vietnam War in the United States and other countries in the 1960s and early 1970s, the New Left in Canada was shaped by three main identity-based movements of antiracism, feminism, and gay-lesbian rights. Toronto was ground zero for the New Left, where its main thinkers, lifestyles and public confrontations took place. For many years Ian McKay was a professor of history at Queen’s University. He now holds an endowed Chair in Canadian History at McMaster University where he heads up the L.R. Wilson Institute of Canadian History, one of the sponsors of the Witness to Yesterday podcast series.

    • 36 min
    A History of Immigrant Arrivals through Pier 21 in Halifax

    A History of Immigrant Arrivals through Pier 21 in Halifax

    In this podcast episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Steve Schwinghamer, the co-author along with Jan Raska of Pier 21: A History published by the University of Ottawa Press as part of its Mercury series in 2020. Between 1928 and 1971, Pier 21 was the main gateway for immigrants arriving in Canada and was transformed as the site for the Canadian Museum of Immigration. Th author is an historian in the Exhibitions, Research and Collections department of the Museum. Steve Schwinghamer is also an affiliate of the Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling at Concordia University and the Gorsebrook Research Institute at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax.

    • 37 min
    Decoding Indigenous Governance in the First Centuries of Contact

    Decoding Indigenous Governance in the First Centuries of Contact

    Patrice Dutil talks with Heidi Bohaker, Professor History at the University of Toronto, about the symbols various Anishinaabe communities used to identify themselves in their vast territory during the 17th and 18th centuries. Bohaker makes the point that these doodems were symbolic of various constitutional arrangements as well as social and legal codes. She also discusses how they evolved with time Bohaker is the author of Doodem and Council Fire: Anishinaabe Governance through Alliance, published by University of Toronto Press. This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

    • 31 min
    Women and the History of the Vote in the Prairie Provinces

    Women and the History of the Vote in the Prairie Provinces

    In this episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Sarah Carter on her book Ours by Every Law of Right and Justice: Women and the Vote in the Prairie Provinces published by the University of British Columbia Press in 2020. She examines the reasons why Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta were the first provinces to extend the vote to women in 1916 and why this same franchise was not extended to First Nations men and women as well as targeted minorities such as Chinese-Canadians until much later. Sarah Carter is professor and Henry Marshall Tory Chair of History and Classics at the University of Alberta and has published extensively on Indigenous history and gender in the Prairie Provinces.

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
39 Ratings

39 Ratings

Richard Patterson ,

Great contribution

These podcasts are fascinating. I am so glad to have subcscribed and look forward to every new episode.

m_cuffa ,

Interesting interviews with serious historians

This is a wonderful, serious, history podcast, centred around interviews with historians. There are many gems. I particularly enjoyed the segment on “How Canada Nearly Forgot the Second World War”.

Guger ,

Entertaining and informative

A friend told me about these Champlain Society podcasts, and I was really pleased to find them. They are all entertaining, informative and just the right length. I often listen while on the GO train or in my car.

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