36 min

New Perspectives on the Internment and Dispossession of Japanese-Canadians Witness to Yesterday (The Champlain Society Podcast on Canadian History)

    • Society & Culture

Greg Marchildon interviews Jordan Stanger-Ross about his new book Landscapes of Injustice: A New Perspective on the Internment and Dispossession of Japanese-Canadians published by McGill-Queen’s University Press in 2020. Stanger-Ross is an associate professor of history at the University of Victoria and has led a multi-year and multi-collaborative project called Landscapes of Injustice. He and the project researchers have produced a major work on the historical details of the Japanese internment which began in 1942 as well as the forced sale of their homes and businesses. Professor Stanger-Ross recounts some of the lesser known details of this tragedy, including the way in which the federal Royal Commission on Japanese Claims (1947-51) addressed, and did not address, the claims of Japanese-Canadians in the years following the Second World War.

Greg Marchildon interviews Jordan Stanger-Ross about his new book Landscapes of Injustice: A New Perspective on the Internment and Dispossession of Japanese-Canadians published by McGill-Queen’s University Press in 2020. Stanger-Ross is an associate professor of history at the University of Victoria and has led a multi-year and multi-collaborative project called Landscapes of Injustice. He and the project researchers have produced a major work on the historical details of the Japanese internment which began in 1942 as well as the forced sale of their homes and businesses. Professor Stanger-Ross recounts some of the lesser known details of this tragedy, including the way in which the federal Royal Commission on Japanese Claims (1947-51) addressed, and did not address, the claims of Japanese-Canadians in the years following the Second World War.

36 min

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