130 episodes

This series of podcasts furthers the Champlain Society mission of deepening awareness of Canada’s documentary past and of the people who created it.

Witness to Yesterday (The Champlain Society Podcast on Canadian History‪)‬ The Champlain Society

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9 • 34 Ratings

This series of podcasts furthers the Champlain Society mission of deepening awareness of Canada’s documentary past and of the people who created it.

    The history of the 1960s scoop of Indigenous children in Prairie Canada

    The history of the 1960s scoop of Indigenous children in Prairie Canada

    In this episode, Greg Marchildon interviews Allyson Stevenson on her book Intimate Integration: A History of the Sixties Scoop and the Decolonization of Indigenous Kinship published by the University of Toronto Press in 2020. She explores the reasons that the Saskatchewan government – and other provincial governments in Canada – established policies that results in the adoption of thousands of Indigenous children by non-Indigenous families. She also discusses government-initiated child apprehension policies and programs that separated children from their Indigenous parents and siblings. Allyson Steven holds the Gabriel Dumont Institute Chair in Métis Studies at the University of Saskatchewan where she completed her Ph.D. in Canadian History in 2015. Her own family migrated out of Red River in the 1870s to Saskatchewan.

    • 31 min
    The Ku Klux Klan in Canada

    The Ku Klux Klan in Canada

    Patrice Dutil examines the reach and impact of the Ku Klux Klan in Canada from its beginnings to today with Allan Bartley, author of The Ku Klux Klan in Canada: A Century of Promoting Racism and Hate in the Peaceable Kingdom, published by Formac. The topics include its beginnings in the 1920s as it was led by a combination of Americans and Torontonians and its particularly significant impact in Saskatchewan in the 1920s. The KKK is revealed as particularly anti-Catholic, anti-immigrant and anti-French as well as anti-Black. Though the KKK assumed a much lower profile after the Second World War, it has experienced a bit of a revival with the rise of the Internet. This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

    • 33 min
    Historic Sites in Prairie Canada

    Historic Sites in Prairie Canada

    In this episode, Greg Marchildon interviews former Parks Canada historian Robert Coutts. After his retirements, Coutts did his PhD in history on the meaning and reinterpretation of historic sites. He then turned his dissertation into the book Authorized Heritage: Place, Memory and Historic Sites in Prairie Canada that was published by the University of Manitoba Press in 2021. In the book, Coutts explores the mean of federal and provincial government official historic sites and the meaning of the authorized histories they produce. He covers historic sites focused on pre-contact Indigenous settlements, the fur trade, Euro-Canadian settlements and places of conflict between Indigenous peoples and settlers. Coutts is currently editor of a new journal called Prairie History based in Winnipeg.

    • 33 min
    A New Perspective on The 1870 Red River Expedition

    A New Perspective on The 1870 Red River Expedition

    Patrice Dutil explores the 1870 Garnet Wolseley expedition to root out the first Riel rebellion in Manitoba with Ted Glenn, Professor of Public Administration at Humber College and the author of Embedded: Two Journalists, a Burlesque Star and the Expedition to Oust Louis Riel, published by Dundurn Press. Together, they discuss the reportage of Toronto-based newsmen Robert Cunningham and Molyneux St. John as well as the role played by Kate Ranoe, an actress and comedienne. All three were “embedded” with the Wolseley expedition and provided particularly distinctive coverage of the historic event. This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

    • 34 min
    Jennifer Brown on the history and ethnography of Indigenous peoples in the Canadian Northwest

    Jennifer Brown on the history and ethnography of Indigenous peoples in the Canadian Northwest

    In this episode, Greg Marchildon interviews historian and ethnographer Jennifer Brown on her two most recent books. The first, Ojibwe Stories from the Upper Berens River: A Irving Hallowell and Adam Bigmouth in Conversation, published by University of Nebraska Press in 2018, concerns the interactions of American anthropologist A. Irving Hallowell and his interactions with the Berens River band on the east side of Lake Winnipeg. The second book, An Ethnohistorian in Rupert’s Land: Unfinished Conversations (published by Athabasca University Press in 2017) is a compilation of Professor Brown’s most influential articles – essays that have reshaped the historiography of Indigenous-settler relations and the role of women. From 1983 until 2008, Jennifer Brown was a professor as well as Director of the Centre for Rupert’s Land Studies at the University of Winnipeg. Since retirement, she has continued to research and write.

    • 38 min
    Viscount Haldane: The Unknown Father of Confederation

    Viscount Haldane: The Unknown Father of Confederation

    Patrice Dutil discusses the impact of Richard Haldane (Viscount Haldane) on the Canadian constitution with John Campbell, the author of Haldane: The Forgotten Statesman who Shaped Britain and Canada (McGill-Queens Univ. Press). They examine Haldane’s life and career as well as his guiding philosophy of keeping government “close to the people” and how it led him to favour provinces in the various judgements he rendered on the Canadian constitution while he sat on the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council.
    This podcast was produced by Jessica Schmidt.

    • 54 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
34 Ratings

34 Ratings

Richard Patterson ,

Great contribution

These podcasts are fascinating. I am so glad to have subcscribed and look forward to every new episode.

m_cuffa ,

Interesting interviews with serious historians

This is a wonderful, serious, history podcast, centred around interviews with historians. There are many gems. I particularly enjoyed the segment on “How Canada Nearly Forgot the Second World War”.

Guger ,

Entertaining and informative

A friend told me about these Champlain Society podcasts, and I was really pleased to find them. They are all entertaining, informative and just the right length. I often listen while on the GO train or in my car.

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