67 episodes

You're Kidding, Right is a podcast by two junior doctors for everything you need to know about paediatrics (or "pediatrics" if you like more bang for your buck from letters). Each week we release an episode on key topics that will help you understand how our littlest patients work. Whether you're a junior doctor, medical student, nursing grad, general practice trainee or anyone who wants to learn the who, what, when, where and how of kids, we will do our very best to make your learning a little easier, and a little more fun! https://www.instagram.com/yourekiddingright.pod/

This podcast is for educational purposes only. Please see your own doctor or local guidelines for information specific to your situation.

You're Kidding, Right‪?‬ Freya Bleathman & Anne Atkins

    • Medicine
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

You're Kidding, Right is a podcast by two junior doctors for everything you need to know about paediatrics (or "pediatrics" if you like more bang for your buck from letters). Each week we release an episode on key topics that will help you understand how our littlest patients work. Whether you're a junior doctor, medical student, nursing grad, general practice trainee or anyone who wants to learn the who, what, when, where and how of kids, we will do our very best to make your learning a little easier, and a little more fun! https://www.instagram.com/yourekiddingright.pod/

This podcast is for educational purposes only. Please see your own doctor or local guidelines for information specific to your situation.

    GCS | glasgow coma scale

    GCS | glasgow coma scale

    The glasgow coma scale is used all the time to assess the level of consciousness of a patient (especially for those with acute head injury). We give a patient a score out of 15 depending on their motor response, their verbal response and the eye response. There are 6 possible points for motor, 5 for voice and 4 for eyes. The higher the score, the better the level of consciousness in the patient. There is a version we can use for pre verbal kids under 2.

    • 7 min
    Whooping cough | pertussis - a whopping big cough

    Whooping cough | pertussis - a whopping big cough

    Pertussis, also known as whooping cough and the 100 day cough, is caused by a bacterial infection. The usual pathogen is Bordetella pertussis, but can also be Bordetella parapertussis. Vaccinations worldwide have overall decreased mortality – prior to vaccination, pertussis was the leading cause of death from communicable disease among US children  
    Classically, children with pertussis present with coryzal symptoms for about a week, known as the catarrhal phase, followed by a dry, intermittent cough that develops into coughing fits that are the hallmark of the disease. Not every child develops the characteristic “whoop” noise with coughing fits, and therefore it is important to remember pertussis as a differential.
     
    One of the major parts of management is deciding who needs antibiotics, and which close contacts need prophylactic antibiotics.  
     
    You don’t want to miss:
    A case Explaining the condition to families Statistics Aetiology Presentation Complications Investigations Management  
    Links and resources:
    Follow us on Instagram @yourekiddingrightdoctors Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/yourekiddingrightpod-107273607638323/  
    Our email is yourekiddingrightpod@gmail.com
    Make sure you hit SUBSCRIBE/FOLLOW so you don’t miss out on any pearls of wisdom and RATE if you can to help other people find us!
    (This isn’t individual medical advice, please use your own clinical judgement and local guidelines when caring for your patients)

    • 18 min
    Physiological bradycardia in sleep | shawty get low low low low low low low

    Physiological bradycardia in sleep | shawty get low low low low low low low

    Bradycardia during sleep is a physiological phenomenon related to increased vagal tone. In the absence of red flags, it does not require investigation. 
     
    You don’t want to miss:
    Why bradycardia in sleep happens Explaining the condition to families Red flags to watch for and when to investigate  
    Links and resources:
    Follow us on Instagram @yourekiddingrightdoctors Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/yourekiddingrightpod-107273607638323/  
    Our email is yourekiddingrightpod@gmail.com
     
    Make sure you hit SUBSCRIBE/FOLLOW so you don’t miss out on any pearls of wisdom and RATE if you can to help other people find us!
     
    (This isn’t individual medical advice, please use your own clinical judgement and local guidelines when caring for your patients)

    • 7 min
    PKU | phenylketonuria

    PKU | phenylketonuria

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is the most common inborn error of metabolism. It is an autosomal recessive condition caused by a disorder of metabolism of an amino acid called phenylalanine. It leads to build up of phenylalanine  in the body which can have serious effects on brain development. Children with PKU can grow and develop normally, if they are carefully monitored and given a diet low in phenylalanine.

    • 18 min
    Intraosseous Access | I can feel it in my bones

    Intraosseous Access | I can feel it in my bones

    Intraosseous access is a type of vascular access that you get through inserting the needle directly into the bone, aiming for the medullary cavity. You get IO access as an alternative to 

    Intravenous access in situations where IV access is not practical or will take too long e.g. a shocked patient who is peripherally shut down. The bone is luckily a non collapsible option!

    • 14 min
    Reflux in babies | here's a little something I saved for later

    Reflux in babies | here's a little something I saved for later

    Gastro-oesophageal reflux is a common, almost expected, phenomenon in babies, and usually resolves by 18 months of age. Although babies may posset (fancy word for a small vomit) frequently, they still gain weight and look like happy, healthy babies. 
     
    Conversely, gastro-oesophageal reflux disease is where the reflux has gone a step further, and complications such as poor growth and oesophagitis have kicked in. 
     
    So what can we do about it? Listen to this episode to find out!
     
    You don’t want to miss:
    A case Explaining the condition to families Statistics Aetiology Presentation Complications Possible investigations Management  
    Links and resources:
    Follow us on Instagram @yourekiddingright.pod Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/yourekiddingrightpod-107273607638323/  
    Our email is yourekiddingrightpod@gmail.com
     
    Make sure you hit SUBSCRIBE/FOLLOW so you don’t miss out on any pearls of wisdom and RATE if you can to help other people find us!
     
    (This isn’t individual medical advice, please use your own clinical judgement and local guidelines when caring for your patients)

    • 20 min

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