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Africa Rights Talk is a Centre for Human Rights podcast exploring human rights through conversations with academics, practitioners and activists. Each episode offers insight into the African human rights system and the state of human rights in Africa, and globally.

Africa Rights Talk africarightstalk

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Africa Rights Talk is a Centre for Human Rights podcast exploring human rights through conversations with academics, practitioners and activists. Each episode offers insight into the African human rights system and the state of human rights in Africa, and globally.

    S3 E1:Binaries and Boxes

    S3 E1:Binaries and Boxes

    In conversation with Dr Mzikazi Nduna
    In this episode Dr Mzikazi Nduna is in conversation with Thiruna Naidoo from the SOGIESC Unit of the Centre for Human Rights, discussing gender binaries and boxes. Dr Nduna explains what sexuality and gender binaries are and goes on to give recommendations on how to rethink sexualities,  gender identities and expressions in a manner that respects human rights. The conversation illustrates how human rights norms often enforce gender binaries and essentialise discourses on gender issues. In light of the high number of recorded cases of gender- based violence in South Africa and other parts of the world,  she advocates for gender-based violence activists to include the LGBTIQ+ community in the conversation.
    Dr Mzikazi Nduna is an esteemed South African with affiliations to a variety of academic and civil society organisations, movements and initiatives. Dr Mzikazi Nduna is an author, educator, a researcher, a trainer and a scholar with a strong ethic of community engagement with science. She has 25 years of work experience that spans teaching in two public high schools, peer education and training in various communities in South Africa, researcher and technical support in local, regional and international collaborations. She currently works as an associate professor at the University of the Witwatersrand. Dr Mzikazi Nduna’s work is underpinned by a philosophy to bridge the gap between science and practice. This has earned her recognition and awards. Dr Mzikazi Nduna contributes to the human rights sector and in particular to the LGBTIQ+ sector through her involvement in boards of organisations such as GenderDynamix, and IRANTI. She also serves the South African government and civil society through her appointment to various task teams: she is currently a member of the National Prevention Task Team for  South African National AIDS Council (SANAC) and the 2020 National Technical Reference Team on the Legal Review of Discriminatory Laws. She has been running workshops and teaching using the ‘Boxes and Binaries’ since 2011 and has been a member of the course Faculty for the past three years. Some of Dr Mzikazi’s Nduna’s publications can be found here.
    This episode was recorded during the Advanced Human Rights Course on Sexual Minority Rights in Africa presented by the Centre for Human Rights.
    This conversation was recorded on 25 February 2021.Edited by Tatenda Musinahama
    Music: Inner Peace by Mike Chino https://soundcloud.com/mike-chinoCreative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported — CC BY-SA 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/0nI6qJeqFcc 

    • 18 Min.
    S2 E18: Award-winning dissertation: A comparative analysis of the role of lawyers in the settlement of international disputes and the development of international law

    S2 E18: Award-winning dissertation: A comparative analysis of the role of lawyers in the settlement of international disputes and the development of international law

    In conversation with Jonathan Kabre
    In today’s conversation, Dr Jonathan Kabre explains how his academic journey in the field of international relations led him to winning the 2020 Law Faculty Prize (Prix de Faculté) from the University of Lausanne for the best doctoral dissertation. His dissertation, through a comparative analysis of case-law of selected international courts and tribunals, examines the role of private lawyers (counsel and advocates) in the settlement of international disputes and their contribution to the development of international law. The monograph, coming from this dissertation, is in the editing process and should be out before the end of the year.
    Dr Kabre is the Programme Manager of the LLM in International Trade and Investment Law in Africa (TILA) presented by Centre for Human Rights and his research focuses on the areas of global economic governance, business and human rights and the settlement of international disputes. He is also Post-doctoral Research Fellow at the International Development Law Unit (IDLU). He was awarded the 2020 Law Faculty Prize (Prix de Faculté) from the University of Lausanne in Switzerland for the best doctoral dissertation. Dr Kabre was also awarded a grant to support the publication of his dissertation. This prize was awarded during the opening ceremony for the 2020 courses at the University of Lausanne, which took place on 15 September 2020.
    This conversation was recorded on 26 October 2020.
    Music: Inner Peace by Mike Chino https://soundcloud.com/mike-chinoCreative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported — CC BY-SA 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/0nI6qJeqFcc 

    • 15 Min.
    S2 E17: #EndSARS: Practical implications of the protests on Nigerian citizens

    S2 E17: #EndSARS: Practical implications of the protests on Nigerian citizens

    Season 2 Episode 17: #EndSARS: Practical implications of the protests on Nigerian citizens
    In conversation with Ayodele Sogunro
    The Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria, condemns police brutality and human rights violations in Nigeria. These violations are in response to demonstrations by Nigerians expressing concerns about gross human rights violations by the Nigerian Police Force (NPF), particularly by the Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS), a tactical unit within the NPF designed to tackle incidents of armed robbery in Nigeria.
    In today’s episode we pick up from last week’s conversation on #EndSARS: The need to end police reform and justice for victims of police brutality in Nigeria. In this week’s episode, we discuss with Ayodele Sogunro (from the Centre for Human Rights), the contested issues surrounding the #EndSARS protests. The discussion assesses the accountability measures which have been taken by the Nigerian government to address protestors’ concerns. Furthermore, the conversation brings to light the real implications of these protests for people at the forefront of the #EndSARS movement. Calls to involve the International Criminal Court (ICC) in investigating the extra-judicial killings of the #LekkiMassacre have been made by Nigerian citizens and we seek to understand whether the African Commission on Human and People’s Rights (ACHPR) might be a better option under the circumstances.
    Ayodele Sogunro is a Nigerian writer and lawyer and the Manager of the SOGIESC Unit at the Centre for Human Rights in the Faculty of Law, University of Pretoria. He is a legal and policy analyst with over ten years of field and courtroom experience in human rights law and advocacy in the African human rights system. Before joining the Centre, he was the Senior Legal Advisor with the Initiative for Equal Rights, a LGBT+ NGO in West Africa. He is also currently undertaking his doctoral studies at the Centre. His focus is on a critical legal studies perspective of LGBTIQ+ issues in Nigeria, around political homophobia, socio-economic issues, and the need by advocates to understand wider state dynamics of homophobia and transphobia in systems of power. His books include the short stories The Wonderful Life of Senator Boniface and other Sorry Tales and the collection of essays Everything in Nigeria is Going to Kill You. His literary essay, ‘One more nation bound in freedom: Themes from the Nigerian “anti-gay” law’ was shortlisted for the 2016 Gerald Kraak Award for African Writing. He has written an article ‘Why #EndSARS won’t quit’ in relation to the protests.
    Ayodele Sogunro’s blog: www.ayosogunro.com
    This conversation was recorded on 29 October 2020.
    Music: Inner Peace by Mike Chino https://soundcloud.com/mike-chinoCreative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported — CC BY-SA 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/0nI6qJeqFcc 

    • 29 Min.
    S2 E16: #EndSARS: The need for police reform and justice for victims of police brutality in Nigeria

    S2 E16: #EndSARS: The need for police reform and justice for victims of police brutality in Nigeria

    In conversation with Victoria Ibezim- Ohaeri
    The Centre for Human Rights, University of Pretoria, condemns police brutality and human rights violations in Nigeria. These violations are in response to demonstrations by Nigerians expressing concerns about gross human rights violations by the Nigerian Police Force (NPF), particularly by the Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS), a tactical unit within the NPF designed to tackle incidents of armed robbery in Nigeria.
    In this week’s episode  we speak to Ms Victoria Ibezim-Ohaeri, founder and Director of Research and Policy at Spaces for Change (S4C). S4C is a non-profit organisation based in Nigeria and conducts cutting-edge research and advocacy focusing on strategic sectors such as urban governance, gender inclusion, energy policy and defending the civic space. In this conversation, she walks us through the recent tensions in the country and analyses these tensions in light of the wider implications on the civic participation in Nigeria. Ms Ibezim- Ohaeri is an SXSW 2013 honouree, a 2016 Desmond Tutu Fellow and a 2015 alumna of Harvard University. In her 15 years of practising law and conducting social and economic rights research and advocacy, she has traversed four continents: Africa, Europe, North America and South America. Here she led research investigations, documenting and exposing human rights violations, formulating and analysing social and economic policy at national, regional and international levels.
    This conversation was recorded on 24 October 2020
    Music: Inner Peace by Mike Chino https://soundcloud.com/mike-chinoCreative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported — CC BY-SA 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/0nI6qJeqFcc 

    • 18 Min.
    S2 E15: Poverty and human Rights In Africa

    S2 E15: Poverty and human Rights In Africa

    Season 2 Episode 15: Poverty and human rights in Africa
    In conversation with Ebenezer Durojaye and Gladys Mirugi-Mukundi
    In this week’s episode, we meet the editors of the book Exploring the link between poverty and human rights in Africa. This book was published by the Pretoria University Law Press (PULP) and launched virtually on 6 August 2020.
    Professor Ebenezer Durojaye and Ms Gladys Mirugi-Mukundi discuss the topical issues covered in the book and the effect of poverty on human rights. Exploring the link between poverty and human rights in Africa is a book which addresses poverty, one of the important issues confronting Africa, from a multi-disciplinary approach. With contributions from eminent scholars from diverse backgrounds, the book explores poverty from a human rights perspective. Its central message is that poverty is not necessarily a failure on the part of an individual, but rather caused by the actions or inactions of governments, which are often exacerbated by structural inequalities in many African societies. This in turn requires a more pragmatic approach grounded in respect for human rights. This book is a useful book for researchers, policymakers, students, activists and others interested in addressing poverty.
    Professor Ebenezer Durojaye is a Professor of Law and head of the Socio-Economic Rights Project at the Dullah Omar Institute, University of the Western Cape, South Africa. His areas of research include human rights, socio-economic rights, sexual and reproductive health and rights, gender and constitutionalism. From 2012 to 2014 he provided technical support to the UN Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights. During this period, he participated in the drafting of the UN Guiding Principles on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights adopted by the Human Rights Council in 2012.
    Gladys Mirugi-Mukundi is a researcher at the Dullah Omar Institute, a think tank engaged in law and policy research, teaching and advocacy on governance and human rights in Africa, based at the University of the Western Cape. Her research expertise and interest are in human rights, socio-economic rights, social justice and inclusive societies, women and access to housing, rule of law and corruption. She is the co-editor the Economic & Social Rights Review in Africa (ESR Review) , a quarterly publication that aims to inform and educate policymakers, members of civil society, the academic community and legal practitioners about key developments relating to socio- economic rights at the national and international levels.
    This book is available for free and can be downloaded from the Pretoria University Law Press (PULP) website.
    This conversation was recorded on 14 August 2020
    Music: Inner Peace by Mike Chino https://soundcloud.com/mike-chinoCreative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported — CC BY-SA 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/0nI6qJeqFcc 

    • 16 Min.
    S2 E14: The positive implications of the Committee on the Rights of the Child to host the first ever United Nations treaty body session outside of Geneva

    S2 E14: The positive implications of the Committee on the Rights of the Child to host the first ever United Nations treaty body session outside of Geneva

    In conversation with Professor Ann Skelton
    In this week’s episode, Professor Ann Skelton walks us through her journey and work in children’s rights. She discusses the positive implications of the Committee on the Rights of the Child to host the first ever United Nations treaty body session outside of Geneva in March 2020 in Samoa. She goes on to discuss the impact of COVID-19 and how it affects state reporting at the United Nations level and how it affects the observation and promotion of the rights of the child. Professor Ann Skelton encourages women to take opportunities when they come, as they come and to work hard at those opportunities. Her advice to aspiring career women, is that they should ensure that they do what they are passionate about, and if they are not sure what that is, to expose themselves to the field of work until something starts pressing their buttons which should motivate them to want to make a difference.
    Professor Ann Skelton is a professor of law at the University of Pretoria, where she holds the UNESCO Chair in Education Law in Africa. She is also the former director of the Centre for Child Law which promotes children’s rights in South Africa through advocacy, law reform, research and litigation. She is a practicing lawyer who often appears in South African courts, arguing landmark children’s rights cases. Professor Ann Skelton is a member of the Committee on the Rights of the Child.
    This conversation was recorded on 20 August 2020.Music: Inner Peace by Mike Chino https://soundcloud.com/mike-chinoCreative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported — CC BY-SA 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b...Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/0nI6qJeqFcc 

    • 19 Min.

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