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We're launching the Interchangeable White Ladies podcast a show where we discuss education, culture, and local activism. We’re teachers so we have an essential question--How can white women use their privilege to deconstruct white culture, confront their own biases, be better allies, and be less basic? Listen to the Interchangeable White Ladies podcast to learn about all that and more!

Interchangeable White Ladies Podcast Hope Teague-Bowling & Annie Jansen

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We're launching the Interchangeable White Ladies podcast a show where we discuss education, culture, and local activism. We’re teachers so we have an essential question--How can white women use their privilege to deconstruct white culture, confront their own biases, be better allies, and be less basic? Listen to the Interchangeable White Ladies podcast to learn about all that and more!

    Ep. 64: Why We ALL Need an Equity Literacy Framework

    Ep. 64: Why We ALL Need an Equity Literacy Framework

    Today’s episode is extra special to us as we get to chat with two incredible educators who are shaping the profession through their interrogation of the personal and professional ways educators perpetuate white cultural norms in schools.
    Our essential question is: How can we “learn to be a threat to inequity in our spheres of influence” in 2020?
    Guests: Katy Swalwell, Associate Professor of Social & Cultural Studies in the School of Education at Iowa State University, and Paul Gorski, founder of Equity Literacy Institute and  EdChange. 
    We first heard about the equity literacy framework from our guest Marquita Prinzing in Ep 46: Don’t be a Passive Progressive Educator and were incredibly excited when Katy reached out to us to share how she was using the podcast with her pre-service teachers. We are incredibly grateful she and Paul were able to come on the show.
    In this episode Katy and Paul describe how they came to this work, specifically unpacking the idea of equity literacy which “moves us beyond cultural competency.”  They share how schools and districts are approaching this differently than a simple list of strategies and emphasize that this work is a mindset shift. We highly recommend that listeners spend some time with the Equity Literacy Institute directly. 
    Finally, we ask Paul to share the story behind his controversial tweet that calls out white liberalism. 
    Do Your Fudging Homework:
    Hope: Read through the equity literacy framework and do a little audit on your life--start first with classroom (the place you have immediate control), then dept/school (larger circles of control).
    Annie: follow Paul on Twitter, follow Katy even though she doesn’t tweet very much. Read their work and buy their book when it comes out. 
    Paul: Teaching Tolerance & New York Collaborative of Radical Educators (NYCORE), Teachers 4 Social Justice 
    Katy: Carter Center for Black History, Freeminds Free People, Paul Ortiz’s History Book, Dolly Parton's America, Dr. Noreen Naseem @NaseemRdz, NYCORE, Rethinking Schools, Zinn Education Project

    Ep. 63: Rethinking the Purpose of Spirituality in 2020

    Ep. 63: Rethinking the Purpose of Spirituality in 2020

    EQ: What obligation do religious communities have in fighting injustice?
    Guest: Dana Coggan is an "environmental advocate, community connector, youth advocate, minister."
    Note to listeners: Last January we had Erin Jones on the show to discuss her take on evangelicalism and politics. Today we’re excited to invite Dana Coggan on our show to have a similar conversation but casting a wider net for understanding faith and spirituality.
    In this episode we discuss the different between being spiritual and being religious. We share stories of how “the church” can both “shape and scare you.” In sharing our own experiences and hearing Dana’s perspective, we reference a handful of current events such as how organizations like Christianity Today, the Methodist Church, and the Mormon Church are struggling to stay relevant or speak out against injustice. 
    References:
    The Inevitable Death of Evangelical Christianity
    Trump Should Be Removed from Office
    200 Evangelicals push back
    Evangelicals helped Trump
    Methodist Church schism over LGBTQ isssues 
    Whistleblower says Mormon Church Abuses its Tax Exemptions
    Champagne & Real Pain:
    Champagne: Open and Affirming Churches
    Real Pain: “Evangelicals” and Trump as Jesus; Mormon church abusing tax exemption
    Do Your Fudging Homework:
    Hope: reconsider the notion of what religion looks like in your life. 
    Annie: Educators, flex your compassion and empathy with your students from faiths and religious practices that differ from your own. 
    Dana: Speak out against the displacement of local homeless community

    Follow us on Twitter @IWL_Podcast or Facebook: Interchangeable White Ladies Podcast

    Ep. 62: Why Social Justice Education Matters in A World on Fire

    Ep. 62: Why Social Justice Education Matters in A World on Fire

    EQ: How can social justice education help students and teachers be better global citizens?
    Today our guest is Christina Torres also known as @biblio_phile. 
    From Teach For America to leading her own classroom at the Punahou School in Honolulu, Hawai‘i, Torres opens up about her journey as a social justice educator.  Throughout the episode we circle back to three major questions:
    What is my work in justice now, given my position of privilege?
    How can I make my kids feel safe/heard/comforted at this moment in time?
    How can I continuously reflect and grow in my own awareness about matters of justice in the world?
    We know that our students will face a variety of challenges, injustices and problems in the world. It’s not about what they will experience but a matter of how they might experience it. Social justice oriented educators strive to equip students with the tools to navigate the challenges (not necessarily solve them).  We help students understand the “danger of a single story.” 
    Finally, we explore the tension between staying aware and protecting our mental health/managing tumultuous times through self-care. We share our own strategies for helping students discuss these important issues while managing the array of emotion present in any given classroom.
    References & Resources:
    Read Christina’s work at any of the following: ChristinaTorres.Org,  Teaching Tolerance,  Honolulu Civil Beat, TeacherPop, PRX’s OnBeing, and EdWeek Teacher.
    Hope especially likes these two pieces: Assessment as an Act of Love; Mindfulness Won’t Save Us. Fixing the System Will. 
    According to Oxfam global citizenship is a framework where students:
    Build their own understanding of world events.
    Think about their values and what's important to them.
    Take learning into the real world.
    Challenge ignorance and intolerance.
    Get involved in their local, national and global communities.
    Develop an argument and voice their opinions.
    See that they have power to act and influence the world around them.
    Unesco defines global citizenship in this way, “While the world may be increasingly interconnected, human rights violations, inequality and poverty still threaten peace and sustainability.”
    NPR Podcast “Codeswitch”
























    Do You Fudging Homework:
    Hope: read up on global citizenship and why, even if you’ve never left Tacoma or whatever city you’re listening from, you should adopt that framework for your life.
    Annie: Timeline: A Modern History of Iran from PBS NewsHour
    Christina: NPR Throughline podcast
    Contact Christina ChristinaTorres.Org or on Twitter @bilbio_phile

    Ep. 61: Fighting for Equity in New Zealand Public Schools

    Ep. 61: Fighting for Equity in New Zealand Public Schools

    Essential Question: How is fighting for equity in schools a universal struggle?
    Sometimes you attend a conference and one of the most powerful takeaways is a connection with someone from another part of the world. When Hope was partnered with Naketa during a pair-share exercise, she knew this was a conversation that needed to be recorded and shared with a wider audience. This week’s episode is truly a GLOBAL conversation. On December 21, Annie braved floods to record in our Tacoma studio. Our amazing guest, Naketa Ikihele woke up bright and early to record with us on her summer vacation (from her car!). Hope tried not to laugh too loudly at 1 am as she recorded in her sister’s dining room in the Philippines.
    Naketa Ikihele is a primary school educator, and coach/consultant with Kia Mahira in Auckland, NZ. To start the show, she introduces herself with a traditional opening common in Maori culture that honors her family, tribe, and land. Throughout the episode, we compare NZ and US education systems, specifically focusing on how teachers fight for diversity and equitable educational opportunities for all students. Naketa shares insight into governance and the effort to revitalize cultural pride in indigenous children. She also describes how NZ systems approach challenges such as the recruitment of teachers and supporting vulnerable students. One highlight is when Naketa shares that developing partnerships with parents is starting with a simple question “what do you dream for your child?”
    For further study:
    Comparing NZ and US system
    IB Learner Profile/Competencies
    Government program New Zealand Now
    Pacific Peoples in New Zealand history & context
    NZ Association for Research in Ed
    Webber and MacFarlane’s research The Transformative Role of Iwi Knowledge and Genealogy in Maori Student Success
    You can follow Naketa’s work by visiting her websiteKia Mahira  or on Twitter @Naketa_NZ
    Champagne & Real Pain:
    Champagne: 2019 is basically over. Good riddance. 
    Real Pain: People comparing Donald Trump’s impeachment trial to Jesus’ trial before Pontius Pilot
    Do Your Fudging Homework:
    Hope: read one of the links we posted & make room in your mind 
    Annie: learn more about global poverty from the “We Day” website

    Ep. 60: It's the Most Wonderful Time To Reignite the War on Christmas

    Ep. 60: It's the Most Wonderful Time To Reignite the War on Christmas

    EQ: How should we handle holidays in the classroom, are they uniquely special abroad, and what do we have to be thankful for this year?
    We review our generally warm feelings about this time of the year, but acknowledge our very Christian upbringings. We delve into why it’s not okay to force Christmas imagery in the classroom even if you are “properly teaching it” or trying to be “exclusive”. We blame Tom Rademacher for restarting the war on Christmas (aka white middle class women) with this tweet:

    If you don’t get the reference, check out this article from Snopes on the history of the struggle.
    Annie and I reflect on why so many Americans “need” to compare everything to Christmas (Christian) traditions. Go read Stop Calling Hanukah the Jewish Christmas. Finally we toast (pass out hypothetical cookies) to our dear friends and family. We are free with the goal for all the shady folks making the holidays about consumerism and Elf on a Shelf.
    Do Your Fudging Homework:
    Hope: Teaching Tolerance series : anti-bias guide to the holidays
    Annie: make your New Years’ Resolution outwardly focused this year and consider what you can do to make the world a better place. List your favorite social justice causes and dedicate extra attention to them this year.

    Ep. 59: On Representation in Film & Creating New Archetypes

    Ep. 59: On Representation in Film & Creating New Archetypes

    EQ: Why are women, specifically women of color, underrepresented in media and media production and what can be done to elevate their voices and experiences?
    Guest: June Nho Ivers. June is a documentary filmmaker and previously joined us for Episode 55: Understanding Gentrification, Displacement, and Mass Incarceration with the incredible Tonya Wilson. 
    Every aspect of this conversation felt like it should be longer. We’ve tried to include links to all the things mentioned in this episode in hopes that you will #belessbasic and learn more about the challenges of representation in media and the way it is changing. 
    Movies Mentioned: 
    Cannes Jury led by first Latin American Filmmaker to lead Jury Inarritu
    Parasite by Bong Joon-Ho (spoilers in this review)
    Atlantics by Mati Diop (first African Woman Director)
    Shows with a Female Lens:
    Outlander
    Fleabag
    Orange is the New Black
    Horror as a sociological genre:
    Midsommar
    Us
    Get out
    LGBTQ lens:
    Ryan Murphy
    Glee
    American Horror Story
    Pose
     Asian Diaspora Representation:
    Always be my maybe
    To all the boys I loved article on Jenny Han/ Whitewashing Casting
    Kim's Convenience
    Music Conversation
    BTS
    Halsey on Being White Presenting
    88 Rising - Asian Rappers
    Seattle Talent
    Sarah Porkalob
    Diana Huey as Ariel
     Theater
    Jonathan Pryce / Miss Saigon
    Noma Dumezweni as Hermione 
    Other Related Links:
    Roger Ebert defending the filmmakers of Better Luck Tomorrow
    Footwork Documentary
    Joji Hopscotch
    It G Ma
    Champagne & Real Pain:
    Champagne: Elle Magazine just released their 2019 Women in Hollywood Power List and 6 of the 12 finalists are women of color. 
    Real Pain: NBC - yes, the television network - for attempting to derail Ronan Farrow’s story exposing Harvey Weinstein. 
    Do Your Fudging Homework:
    Hope: Maureen Goo
    Annie: Go read the Elle Magazine 2019 Women in Hollywood Power List. Women and Hollywood, specifically their resources on Women of Color in media and the importance of representation. 
    June: Free the Work , Harlot, Kingdom

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