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The Department of Planetary Sciences / Lunar and Planetary Laboratory at the University of Arizona periodically hosts community events in conjunction with our current research projects. The LPL Evening Lecture Series include LPL scientists who will present their latest scientific research that include some of the world's most exciting space missions.

LPL Evening Lecture Series University of Arizona

    • Wissenschaft

The Department of Planetary Sciences / Lunar and Planetary Laboratory at the University of Arizona periodically hosts community events in conjunction with our current research projects. The LPL Evening Lecture Series include LPL scientists who will present their latest scientific research that include some of the world's most exciting space missions.

    • video
    Radar on Titan: New Discoveries about Methane Lakes and Streams

    Radar on Titan: New Discoveries about Methane Lakes and Streams

    Abstract: Instruments aboard the Cassini Orbiter have revealed that Saturn's giant moon, Titan, is a world of lakes, streams, mountains and, possibly, ice volcanoes. This lecture will focus on radar images that are giving scientists first-of-a-kind views of an exotic world that may yield insights about Earth's past and future. In the spring of 2001, Dr. Lunine accepted the position of David C. Duncan Professor of Astronomy at Cornell. Lecture given Jan. 22, 2008.

    • 1 Std. 2 Min.
    • video
    Scientific Results of NASA's Deep Impact Mission

    Scientific Results of NASA's Deep Impact Mission

    Abstract: On July 4, 2005, NASA deliberately collided a 700-pound spacecraft with comet Tempel 1 at a speed of 22,500 miles per hour. The object of this kamikaze mission was to find out what is below a comet's surface. Although the dust blown out by the impact obscured the final crater, the mission swept away old ideas about comets and revealed a new vision of cometary structure. This lecture will discuss the mission itself, some old ideas about comets and the new ideas that came from this daring experiment. Feb. 26, 2008.

    • 1 Std. 15 Min.
    • video
    New Vistas of the Moon and Mars

    New Vistas of the Moon and Mars

    Abstract: The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is returning spectacular high-resolution, color, three-dimensional images of Mars. By late 2008 or early 2009, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter will be launched, arriving at the moon three days later. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera will return images that are at as high resolution as those from HiRISE. This talk will discuss why scientists want to compare the high-resolution images of the moon and Mars. The moon is like a "control experiment" when it comes to showing the effects of impacts and volcanism on a dry planet, processes which also occur in the ice-rich crust of Mars. April 22, 2008.

    • 1 Std. 6 Min.
    • video
    The Phoenix Mission: A Trip to the Martian Arctic

    The Phoenix Mission: A Trip to the Martian Arctic

    Peter H. Smith was Principal Investigator of the Phoenix Mars Mission.

    • 49 Min.
    • video
    Unmasking Europa: The Search for Life on Jupiter’s Ocean Moon

    Unmasking Europa: The Search for Life on Jupiter’s Ocean Moon

    Greenberg was a 25-year member of the Galileo Imaging Team and is currently a member of a science definition team that is planning a possible NASA flagship mission to Europa. He led a small group of graduate students at the UA's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory in analyzing Galileo's high-resolution views of Europa in the last decade. Galileo showed Europa's surface is anything but smooth. Its surface is covered with vast crisscrossing systems of mountain-sized ridges, jumbled regions of seemingly chaotic terrain and patches that suggest upwellings of new surface materials from below.

    • 55 Min.
    • video
    The Science and Exploration of Near-Earth Asteroids

    The Science and Exploration of Near-Earth Asteroids

    Abstract: Over 5,000 asteroids exist in near-Earth space. Many of these objects are more easily accessible than the surface of the moon. These bodies record the ancient history of our solar system and represent the largest potential natural disaster facing mankind. In addition, they represent significant natural resources for space exploration in the form of water, hydrocarbons, metals and building materials. Over the coming decades, these objects may be the target of intense exploration to discern their ancient history and pave the way for large-scale human settlement of space.

    • 1 Std. 19 Min.

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