30 episodes

Hosted by Molly Wood, “Marketplace Tech” demystifies the digital economy. The daily show uncovers how tech influences our lives in unexpected ways and provides context for listeners who care about the impact of tech, business and the digital world.

Marketplace Tech American Public Media

    • Tech News

Hosted by Molly Wood, “Marketplace Tech” demystifies the digital economy. The daily show uncovers how tech influences our lives in unexpected ways and provides context for listeners who care about the impact of tech, business and the digital world.

    Swipe right for safety features (and give up more data)

    Swipe right for safety features (and give up more data)

    It was probably a busy weekend on Tinder with Valentine’s Day and all. Hopefully it was also a safe weekend on Tinder. The company last month announced a panic button feature for the app to let users report if they feel unsafe on a date, as well as a check-in feature to let your friends know where you are when you’re out with someone. But as always, there’s a catch. You have to share your location constantly to use the new features. Molly Wood spoke with Marketplace’s media reporter Jasmine Garsd who told said that these changes are happening partly because maybe Tinder itself isn’t a very good date.

    • 5 min
    Tech + old mattresses make gardens grow in refugee camp

    Tech + old mattresses make gardens grow in refugee camp

    Some 80,000 people live in the Za’atari refugee camp in Jordan, the world’s largest for people fleeing the war in Syria. As the camp has evolved from a temporary tent city to a semi-permanent settlement of prefabricated houses, a surprising challenge has emerged: what to do with thousands of discarded mattresses. Chemist Tony Ryan from the University of Sheffield knew exactly what to do — use them to grow food. Amy Scott spoke with Victoria Gill, who reported this story for BBC.

    • 7 min
    FTC scrutiny of Big Tech digs into old deals

    FTC scrutiny of Big Tech digs into old deals

    This week, the Federal Trade Commission demanded that the five biggest tech companies turn over years of information on some of their past acquisitions. They’re not focusing on the big purchases, like Facebook buying Instagram or Google buying Waze, its navigation competitor, but more on the tiny ones that were too small to be reported to antitrust officials. Molly Wood spoke with Diane Bartz, who covers antitrust for Reuters, about all of this.

    • 6 min
    Everything’s on Wikipedia. Misinformation, too. But Wiki says its editing process quickly shuts that down.

    Everything’s on Wikipedia. Misinformation, too. But Wiki says its editing process quickly shuts that down.

    At any given time, Wikipedia’s army of volunteer editors might be fighting a raging battle to make sure that a page contains the truth. That’s happening this week on Wikipedia entries about the coronavirus. Considering the state of information online, Wikipedia’s goal of providing free information for no incentive other than providing information is reassuring, assuming it can beat back the trolls. Host Molly Wood spoke with Katherine Maher, CEO of the Wikimedia Foundation, which oversees Wikipedia, and asked her how often the site gets hit by misinformation campaigns.

    • 29 min
    Instagram makes lots of money. Now creators want some of the profits.

    Instagram makes lots of money. Now creators want some of the profits.

    In recent days, we’ve started to find out how much money YouTube and Instagram are making. During its recent earnings report, Alphabet said YouTube made just over $15 billion in advertising sales in 2019. Sarah Frier, a reporter at Bloomberg, reported that Instagram made $20 billion last year in ad sales, more than a quarter of Facebook’s total revenue. But YouTube shares its ad revenue with the creators on its platform and Instagram doesn’t, even though both rely on a steady stream of uploads from their users. Frier told host Molly Wood that soon IG creators will want some of that money.

    • 5 min
    Virus video games are suddenly more popular than ever

    Virus video games are suddenly more popular than ever

    The coronavirus in China is having a large impact on the economy and on many travelers — businesses, factories and stores are shut. With so many people staying home quarantined, they’re going online to entertain themselves. Health and fitness apps are seeing surges in downloads, but it’s video games that have seen the real leap in popularity. The strategy simulation game Plague Inc. jumped recently to the top of Apple’s App Store for games in China. Jack Stewart spoke with Marketplace’s media reporter Jasmine Garsd, who said it’s one that’s eerily similar to the real-life situation that people are finding themselves in.

    • 6 min

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