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In depth and personal interviews from the leading characters of Sailing's diverse competitive arena, hosted by the sport's leading media personality, double Olympic gold medallist, Shirley Robertson.From inside the closed doors of the America's Cup, to the pressures and excitement of the Olympic race course, the danger and jeopardy of racing non-stop around the planet to the ultimate quest for the world's fastest sailing boat, Shirley Robertson sits down and talks all things sailing with the brightest lights in the sport.

Shirley Robertson's Sailing Podcast Shirley Robertson

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In depth and personal interviews from the leading characters of Sailing's diverse competitive arena, hosted by the sport's leading media personality, double Olympic gold medallist, Shirley Robertson.From inside the closed doors of the America's Cup, to the pressures and excitement of the Olympic race course, the danger and jeopardy of racing non-stop around the planet to the ultimate quest for the world's fastest sailing boat, Shirley Robertson sits down and talks all things sailing with the brightest lights in the sport.

    Season 3 - Ep6 - Mike Sanderson Part2

    Season 3 - Ep6 - Mike Sanderson Part2

    Part 2 of this month's podcast which sees  Shirley Robertson talk to one of the world's leading offshore and Maxi yacht skippers, from New Zealand, Mike "Moose" Sanderson.  With tales to tell from the America's Cup, the Volvo Ocean Race and a host of successful Maxi yacht campaigns, Sanderson is a man who very obviously loves to talk sailing.  Having left school early to pursue a career as a sail maker, he has spent his entire adult life immersed in the sport, and from his very first answer his enthusiasm and passion is there for all to hear.

    Having sat down to talk just days after Emirates Team New Zealand's win at the 36th America's Cup, the pair kick things off with a short chat about the successful defence of the Cup, before moving on to Sanderson's early love of sailing and desire to make a living from the sport.  HIs early inspiration was New Zealand's 1987 Freemantle America's Cup campaign, and of course Sir Peter Blake, and "Steinlager 2's" Whitbread win of 1990, both of which drove him to quit school and take to sailing.  Within a few years he had attracted the attention of some big names, in a country where big things were happening in the sport of sailing.  At twenty one he was on the crew of New Zealand Endeavour, off around the world on the Whitbread, and his career was well underway.

    "What was unbelievable about that campaign was that it was only four or five years after Freemantle, and all my heroes from Freemantle were actually sailing on the boat, these guys had literally all been on posters on my wall, and now I'm getting to sail around the world with them!"

    That 1993/94 Whitbread Race was his first of many circumnavigations that made a big impression on the young twenty two year old.

    "My first time around the world was like honestly, it was like reading a book about the round the world race...in the Southern Ocean we broke the mizzen mast, everything which I dreamt about, good and bad, it all happened.  It was a very surreal time."

    The 1993/94 Whitbread was the start of a career that would take in America's Cup campaigns, multiple Whitbread and Volvo Ocean Race campaigns, and a World Sailor of the Year win in 2006, having become the youngest skipper ever to win the prestigious Volvo Ocean Race leading the famed "ABN Amro I" campaign.  His career spans the modern era of yacht racing, and has seen him sail with some of the biggest names in the sport.

    He talks candidly about the Cup period in 2003 in Auckland when Alinghi beat Team New Zealand, and of the implications that had for the sport...:

    "That 1989 to 2000 period was interesting times....post 2000 of course was probably the biggest turning point in professional sailing that we've seen....because it went from something that you could possibly live on to literally overnight salaries tripled, quadrupled, whatever you like, suddenly every man and his dog was putting up there hand.  It was a great time to be a professional sailor"

    As an insight into the modern professional era of competitive sailing, this honest and engaging interview opens the door on life as a professional in our sport, and takes the listener down a multitude of different avenues, as Sanderson opens up on a lifetime spent sailing at the highest level.

    This edition of the podcast is in two parts and is available to listen to via the podcast page of Shirley’s own website, at www.shirleyrobertson.com/podcast or via most popular podcast outlets, including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcast and aCast. The podcast is produced and written by Tim Butt - for further enquires, please contact podcast@shirleyrobertson.com. 
    Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sailingpodcast)

    • 57 Min.
    Season 3 - Ep5 - Mike Sanderson Part1

    Season 3 - Ep5 - Mike Sanderson Part1

    This month on her podcast Shirley Robertson talks to one of the world's leading offshore and Maxi yacht skippers, from New Zealand, Mike "Moose" Sanderson.  With tales to tell from the America's Cup, the Volvo Ocean Race and a host of successful Maxi yacht campaigns, Sanderson is a man who very obviously loves to talk sailing.  Having left school early to pursue a career as a sail maker, he has spent his entire adult life immersed in the sport, and from his very first answer his enthusiasm and passion is there for all to hear.

    Having sat down to talk just days after Emirates Team New Zealand's win at the 36th America's Cup, the pair kick things off with a short chat about the successful defence of the Cup, before moving on to Sanderson's early love of sailing and desire to make a living from the sport.  HIs early inspiration was New Zealand's 1987 Freemantle America's Cup campaign, and of course Sir Peter Blake, and "Steinlager 2's" Whitbread win of 1990, both of which drove him to quit school and take to sailing.  Within a few years he had attracted the attention of some big names, in a country where big things were happening in the sport of sailing.  At twenty one he was on the crew of New Zealand Endeavour, off around the world on the Whitbread, and his career was well underway.

    "What was unbelievable about that campaign was that it was only four or five years after Freemantle, and all my heroes from Freemantle were actually sailing on the boat, these guys had literally all been on posters on my wall, and now I'm getting to sail around the world with them!"

    That 1993/94 Whitbread Race was his first of many circumnavigations that made a big impression on the young twenty two year old.

    "My first time around the world was like honestly, it was like reading a book about the round the world race...in the Southern Ocean we broke the mizzen mast, everything which I dreamt about, good and bad, it all happened.  It was a very surreal time."

    The 1993/94 Whitbread was the start of a career that would take in America's Cup campaigns, multiple Whitbread and Volvo Ocean Race campaigns, and a World Sailor of the Year win in 2006, having become the youngest skipper ever to win the prestigious Volvo Ocean Race leading the famed "ABN Amro I" campaign.  His career spans the modern era of yacht racing, and has seen him sail with some of the biggest names in the sport.

    He talks candidly about the Cup period in 2003 in Auckland when Alinghi beat Team New Zealand, and of the implications that had for the sport...:

    "That 1989 to 2000 period was interesting times....post 2000 of course was probably the biggest turning point in professional sailing that we've seen....because it went from something that you could possibly live on to literally overnight salaries tripled, quadrupled, whatever you like, suddenly every man and his dog was putting up there hand.  It was a great time to be a professional sailor"

    As an insight into the modern professional era of competitive sailing, this honest and engaging interview opens the door on life as a professional in our sport, and takes the listener down a multitude of different avenues, as Sanderson opens up on a lifetime spent sailing at the highest level. 

    This edition of the podcast is in two parts and is available to listen to via the podcast page of Shirley’s own website, at www.shirleyrobertson.com/podcast or via most popular podcast outlets, including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcast and aCast. The podcast is produced and written by Tim Butt - for further enquires, please contact podcast@shirleyrobertson.com. 
    Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sailingpodcast)

    • 1 Std. 3 Min.
    Season 3 - Ep4 - Brad Butterworth Part 2

    Season 3 - Ep4 - Brad Butterworth Part 2

    Shirley Robertson's guest this month is one of the most successful tacticians of the modern era.  From the America's Cup to the Whitbread, the Admirals Cup to the Sydney Hobart, New Zealand's Brad Butterworth has been at the sharp end of competitive sailing for his entire adult life, and has a grand prix sailing CV few could match.
    The duo sat down together at the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron in Auckland where Butterworth had been consulting for the official Challenger of record, Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli.  The pair kick things off by discussing various aspects of the thirty sixth America's Cup, including the adoption of the new Cup Class, the AC75, and Brad's role as mediator between the Challenger and the Defender.
    Sailing since his early school days, Butterworth has strong opinions on various aspects of the America's Cup, and as a winner of four consecutive Cups for two different nations, has more back to back race wins than any afterguard member in Cup history, a fact that in 2004 saw him honoured in the America's Cup Hall of Fame.  

    In Part 1 of this two part podcast, Robertson and Butterworth  talk about his days campaigning with Sir Peter Blake, in the Whitbread Race of 1995, a race that saw 'Steinlager II' dominate the fleet, a fact that had a great effect on the up and coming Butterworth, but in Part 2 the talk centres on Butterworth's successes in the America's Cup, winning  for New Zealand in 1995, successfully defending the Cup on home waters in 2000 and then, in a move hugely unpopular with the sailing mad New Zealand public, moving from Team New Zealand to Swiss rivals and eventual 2003 winners Alinghi...:

    "It was crazy, it was madness, they were trying to put bullet proof vests on us when we towed out, he (Coutts) had protection, I had protection, a lot of the guys, Kiwis, had protection....they started a movement called Blackheart, which was a great name, for a group that hated us guys.  It got out of control.  They tried to make it as hard as they possibly could to leave here and compete."
    As an insight into the behind the scenes goings on at the highest level of our sport, this two part podcast is a fascinating discussion with one of the most candid, high level names in sailing.  From nationality rules to classes of boat through to race formats and court cases, all told from the perspective of a man who openly admits few people would ever call him diplomatic.
    Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sailingpodcast)

    • 58 Min.
    Season 3 - Ep3 - Brad Butterworth Part 1

    Season 3 - Ep3 - Brad Butterworth Part 1

    Shirley Robertson's guest this month is one of the most successful tacticians of the modern era.  From the America's Cup to the Whitbread, the Admirals Cup to the Sydney Hobart, New Zealand's Brad Butterworth has been at the sharp end of competitive sailing for his entire adult life, and has a grand prix sailing CV few could match.
    The duo sat down together at the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron in Auckland where Butterworth had been consulting for the official Challenger of record, Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli.  The pair kick things off by discussing various aspects of the thirty sixth America's Cup, including the adoption of the new Cup Class, the AC75, and Brad's role as mediator between the Challenger and the Defender.
    Sailing since his early school days, Butterworth has strong opinions on various aspects of the America's Cup, and as a winner of four consecutive Cups for two different nations, has more back to back race wins than any afterguard member in Cup history, a fact that in 2004 saw him honoured in the America's Cup Hall of Fame.  Robertson and Butterworth spend much time discussing this rich Cup history but also talk about his days campaigning with Sir Peter Blake, in the Whitbread Race of 1995, a race that saw 'Steinlager II' dominate the fleet, a fact that had a great effect on the up and coming Butterworth...:
    "He's the best seaman I've ever seen, with seamanship skills by far the best, in the world, I would say, and he taught us guys all of what we know today....When he put his (sea)boots on, you paid attention, you'd think 'OK, things are a bit hairy up there', he was very good with the weather, he had the utmost respect from us guys, until the day he died."
    With Blake as skipper, and Butterworth as one of the watch leaders, "Steinlager II" won every one of the six  legs of that 1989-90 Whitbread Race, and remains the only boat to have ever sailed a clean sweep of what is now The Ocean Race.
    In 1989 Brad Butterworth joined the crew of Larry Ellison's Sayonara to sail in the Sydney to Hobart race, taking line honours in an addition that would become synonymous with tragedy and loss of life.  Six sailors were lost as the one hundred and fifteen strong fleet were battered by unprecedented storms on the 630 mile course.
    "It's a hard thing for them to do but they should have cancelled it, or delayed it, by two days would have made a huge difference.  But it was a beautiful day sailing out of Sydney Heads, a full on Sydney farewell, and then that night that southerly buster came in and just got worse and worse.  And then the wind gear blew off the top of the tree at seventy two knots, it took us four hours to put the storm jib on, the sea state was so bad"
    In Part 2 of their chat Butterworth talks to Robertson about winning the Cup for New Zealand, successfully defending the Cup on home waters and then, in a move hugely unpopular with the sailing mad New Zealand public, moving from Team New Zealand to Swiss rivals and eventual 2003 winners Alinghi...:

    "It was crazy, it was madness, they were trying to put bullet proof vests on us when we towed out, he (Coutts) had protection, I had protection, a lot of the guys, Kiwis, had protection....they started a movement called Blackheart, which was a great name, for a group that hated us guys.  It got out of control.  They tried to make it as hard as they possibly could to leave here and compete."
    As an insight into the behind the scenes goings on at the highest level of our sport, this two part podcast is a fascinating discussion with one of the most candid, high level names in sailing.  From nationality rules to classes of boat through to race formats and court cases, all told from the perspective of a man who openly admits few people would ever call him diplomatic.
    Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sailingpodcast)

    • 56 Min.
    Season 3 - Ep2 - Terry Hutchinson Part 2

    Season 3 - Ep2 - Terry Hutchinson Part 2

    Season 3 of the Podcast continues here with Part 2 of Shirley Robertson's chat with American Magic main man Terry Hutchinson...:
    Shirley Robertson's Sailing Podcast continues with this, the second of a two part interview with one of the sport's most decorated skippers.  American sailor Terry Hutchinson has been a world champion sixteen times, he's twice been World Sailor of the Year and has competed in five America's Cup campaigns.  Most recently he lead the New York Yacht Club's return to the Cup as the skipper and Executive Director of AC36 Challengers American Magic.
    Talking in Auckland after the culmination of the Prada Cup Challenger Series, Hutchinson and Robertson spend this Part 2 discussing American Magic's campaign at AC36,  in a franf and candid interview that sees Terry initially reveal how the team  felt about their fellow Challengers heading into the Prada Cup,  discussing the landscape heading into the start of competition in Auckland.  In a pragmatic and candid discussion, Terry then talks Shirley through the race against Luna Rossa on January 17th, as he reveals the impact of the team's capsize on the campaign...:
    "In retrospect the thing I regret the most is not chirping up and saying, having the presence of mind to say  'hey, just protect the asset here' because we had a big lead. but the previous leg, we had done the exact same manoeuvre." It's an honest and revealing discussion that takes place at a difficult time for Hutchinson, clearly disappointed at the end result for a team that he feels had a lot more to give at AC36...:
    "The hard part is that my measure is the scorecard.  When I get on the plane, I definitely know I'm gonna be sad, we're leaving without what we came for, and at the same time I do take solace in the fact that we conducted ourselves in the manner that not only the Club, but our principals would have expected us to.  That has to mean something, but I still use the scorecard as the measure."
    This edition of the podcast is in two parts and is available to listen to via the podcast page of Shirley’s own website, at www.shirleyrobertson.com/podcast or via most popular podcast outlets, including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcast and aCast. The podcast is produced and written by Tim Butt - for further enquires, please contact podcast@shirleyrobertson.com 

    • 57 Min.
    Season 3 - Ep1 - Terry Hutchinson Part1

    Season 3 - Ep1 - Terry Hutchinson Part1

    Shirley Robertson kicks of Season 3 of the Podcast with American Magic main man Terry Hutchinson...:
    Shirley Robertson's Sailing Podcast is here for another Series, and gets underway with this, the first of a two part interview with one of the sport's most decorated skippers.  American sailor Terry Hutchinson has been a world champion sixteen times, he's twice been World Sailor of the Year and has competed in five America's Cup campaigns.  Most recently he lead the New York Yacht Club's return to the Cup as the skipper and Executive Director of AC36 Challengers American Magic.
    Talking in Auckland after the culmination of the Prada Cup Challenger Series, Hutchinson and Robertson spend much of Part 2 discussing American Magic's campaign at AC36, but kick off the podcast here with tales of Terry's early career, during which he shares an admission that as a school boy in 1983, he skipped class to go and watch Dennis Connor, then sitting at 3-3 against "Australia II" ultimately lose the America's Cup...:
    "I thought, there's a big race going on and I need to go and watch this so I asked my teacher if I could go to the bathroom, and I just kept walking and walked down to Marmadukes in Eastport and watched Dennis go from winning that race to not winning.  After the race was over I walked back into school and low and behold everyone was wondering where I was, my Mom was there wondering 'what did you do!', and I was 'Race 7 of the America's Cup was going on, I had to go and watch it!'"
    It was a determination that would see Hutchinson rise through the ranks of the American sailing world, joining Paul Cayard in 2000 as main trimmer on board America One.  The pair discuss Terry's early Cup exploits, including joining the 2003 Stars and Stripes campaign with Dennis Connor...:
    "I went to his house for dinner, he cooked this incredible chicken curry, and I went to his house and when I walked in, he's got this replica of the America's Cup.  To be considered part of his team, was really an unbelievable compliment." Other Cup highlights in this part include sailing against Alinghi for Emirates Team New Zealand in 2007, and then campaigning with Artemis in the build up to San Francisco 2013, during which time Hutchinson sailed on the radical new Extreme Sailing series.  Robertson and Hutchinson also discuss the phenomenal success of Quantum Racing, the TP52 sailing series and Terry's relationship with team owner Doug DeVoss.
    Inevitably though, much of the chat centres around the 36th America's Cup, and Terry's recent campaign with American Magic.  In Part 2 Terry reveals how the team  felt about their fellow Challengers heading into the Prada Cup, as they discuss the landscape heading into the start of competition in Auckland.  In a pragmatic and candid discussion, Terry then talks Shirley through the race against Luna Rossa on January 17th, as he reveals the impact of the team's capsize on the campaign...:
    "In retrospect the thing I regret the most is not chirping up and saying, having the presence of mind to say  'hey, just protect the asset here' because we had a big lead. but the previous leg, we had done the exact same manoeuvre."
    It's an honest and revealing discussion that takes place at a difficult time for Hutchinson, clearly disappointed at the end result for a team that he feels had a lot more to give at AC36...:
    This edition of the podcast is in 2 parts and is available to listen to via the podcast page of Shirley’s own website, at www.shirleyrobertson.com/podcast or via most popular podcast outlets, including Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcast and aCast. The podcast is produced and written by Tim Butt - for further enquires, please contact podcast@shirleyrobertson.com 

    • 1 Std.

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