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Casual conversations between hosts (Matthew & Amy) and leading researchers in the field of animal behavior, merging science and stories. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

The Animal Behavior Podcast The Animal Behavior Podcast

    • Wissenschaft

Casual conversations between hosts (Matthew & Amy) and leading researchers in the field of animal behavior, merging science and stories. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

    E07: Dai Shizuka on Sociality and Space Use

    E07: Dai Shizuka on Sociality and Space Use

    Episode Summary:

    In this episode, Matthew speaks with Dai Shizuka (@ShizukaLab), an associate professor in the school of biological sciences at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

    They start out by talking about social networks in humans and non-human animals. They discuss applying these techniques to non-model organisms, like the golden-crowned sparrows that Dai has studied. Then they talk about the relationship between space use and sociality, and the feedback between the two.  After the break, they talk about how Dai was drawn to animal behavior while growing up in urban environments, and his work to promote justice for those in his academic and non-academic communities.

    For more content from this interview with Dai, check out the Supplemental Material bonus episode in your feed.

    This week's Two-Minute Takeaway comes from Brett Hodinka (@BrettHodinka), a graduate student at Simon Fraser University. Read more about Brett's work here.

    Media relevant to today's show:

    1.  Dai's paper establishing the existence of stable social networks in golden-crowned sparrows

    Shizuka, D., Chaine, A. S., Anderson, J., Johnson, O., Laursen, I. M., & Lyon, B. E. (2014). Across‐year social stability shapes network structure in wintering migrant sparrows. Ecology Letters, 17(8), 998-1007.

    2.  Dai's work demonstrating that manipulation of badges of status does not fool sparrows that know each other

    Chaine, A. S., Shizuka, D., Block, T. A., Zhang, L., & Lyon, B. E. (2018). Manipulating badges of status only fools strangers. Ecology letters, 21(10), 1477-1485.

    3.  Check out the Asian Community and Cultural Center in Lincoln, NE
    Credits:

    The Animal Behavior Podcast is created by Matthew Zipple (@MatthewZipple) and Amy Strauss (@avstrauss).

    You can contact us at animalbehaviorpod@gmail.com and find us on Twitter (@AnimalBehavPod).

    Our theme song is by Sally Street (@Rainbow_Road13), assistant professor in evolutionary anthropology at Durham University in the UK. You can find her on Sound Cloud here: https://soundcloud.com/rainbow_road_music.

    Musical transitions by André Gonçalves (@fieryangelsfell), a researcher at the primate research institute at Kyoto University.

    Our logo was designed by Adeline Durand-Monteil (@adelinedurandm), a master’s student in ecology and evolution. You can see more of Adeline's work on her website: https://adelinedurandmonteil.wordpress.com/.

    The Animal Behavior Podcast is produced with support from the Animal Behavior Society (@AnimBehSociety)

    • 45 Min.
    Supplemental Material: Dai Shizuka

    Supplemental Material: Dai Shizuka

    Bonus content to accompany Episode 7.

    We recommend listening to the full episode with Dai first before listening to this bonus content.

    Let us know what you think about this new bonus format at animalbehaviorpod@gmail.com

    • 22 Min.
    E06: Eileen Hebets on Arachnid Sensory Systems, Extreme Mating Behavior, and Science Communication

    E06: Eileen Hebets on Arachnid Sensory Systems, Extreme Mating Behavior, and Science Communication

    Episode Summary:

    In this episode, Amy speaks with Eileen Hebets (@hebets_lab), a Professor in the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Nebraska - Lincoln and the current President of the Animal Behavior Society.

    They start out discussing sensory systems and the evolution of multimodal communication in arachnids. Then, we learn about sexual cannibalism and the evolution of this terminal investment strategy by males in many spider species. They also talk about Eileen's research into cognition and learning in arachnids.

    After the break, Amy and Eileen talk about the importance of basic research for innovation and discovery, as well as Eileen's experience learning to quantify and evaluate her science communication efforts.

    This week's Two-Minute Takeaway comes from Emily Ray (@emilyjray21), a doctoral student at Louisiana State University studying filial cannibalism control in a maternal mouthbrooding cichlid fish, Astatotilapia burtoni. Currently, she is investigating the sensory signals that drive parent-offspring recognition and aims to identify its neural correlates.
    Select links relevant to today's show:

    1. Barron, AB*, E.A. Hebets*, T.A. Cleland, C.L. Fitzpatrick, M.E. Hauber, & J.Stevens. 2015. FORUM: Embracing multiple definitions of learning. Trends in Neuroscience 38:405-407. (*shared first author)
    2. Hebets, E. A. 2003.  Subadult experience influences adult mate choice in an arthropod: Exposed female wolf spiders prefer males of a familiar phenotype. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science 100: 13390-13395. 
    3. Learn about one of Eileen's ongoing outreach projects: Eight Legged Encounters
    Credits:

    The Animal Behavior Podcast is created by Matthew Zipple (@MatthewZipple) and Amy Strauss (@avstrauss). If you like what you heard, please subscribe wherever you’re listening now, leave us a rating or review, and share us with your friends and colleagues.

    You can contact us at animalbehaviorpod@gmail.com and find us on Twitter (@AnimalBehavPod).

    Our theme song is by Sally Street (@Rainbow_Road13), Assistant Professor in Evolutionary Anthropology at Durham University in the UK. You can find her on Sound Cloud here: https://soundcloud.com/rainbow_road_music.

    Musical transitions by André Gonçalves (@fieryangelsfell), a Researcher at the Primate Research Institute at Kyoto University.

    Our logo was designed by Adeline Durand-Monteil (@adelinedurandm), a Master’s Student in Ecology and Evolution. You can see more of Adeline's work on her website: https://adelinedurandmonteil.wordpress.com/.

    The Animal Behavior Podcast is produced with support from the Animal Behavior Society (@AnimBehSociety).

    • 45 Min.
    E05: Marcela Benítez on Social Comparisons and Cognition in Non-human Primates

    E05: Marcela Benítez on Social Comparisons and Cognition in Non-human Primates

    Episode Summary:

    In this episode, Matthew speaks with Marcela Benítez (@mebenitez85), an assistant professor in the department of Anthropology at Emory University and co-director of the Capuchinos de Taboga research project.

    They start out by talking about social comparisons in humans and non-human primates. They discuss mutual assessment and Marcela's work exploring mutual assessment in geladas. Then they talk about non-human primate perceptions of inequity, its implications for cooperation, and the role of outgroups in promoting in-group cooperation. After the break, they discuss the overlap between psychology, anthropology, and evolutionary anthropology as well as the work of Marcela and her colleagues to make primate fieldwork for accessible for undergraduates.

    For more content from this interview with Marcela, check out the Supplemental Material bonus episode in your feed.

    This week's Two-Minute Takeaway comes from Sateesh Vankatesh (@SVenkatesh__), a graduate student in the labs of Dr. Joshua Plotnik (@cccanimals) and Dr. Shifra Goldenberg (@ShifGold), working with the Smithsonian (@NationalZoo). Read more about the Comparative Cognition for Conservation lab here.

    Papers relevant to today's show:

    1. The discussed review of social comparisons and their evolutionary origins

    Benítez, M. E., & Brosnan, S. F. (2019). The Evolutionary Roots of Social Comparisons. Social Comparison, Judgment, and Behavior, 462.

    2.  Marcela's paper demonstrating mutual assessment of fighting ability in geladas

    Benítez, M. E., Pappano, D. J., Beehner, J. C., & Bergman, T. J. (2017). Evidence for mutual assessment in a wild primate. Scientific reports, 7(1), 1-11.

    3. Sarah Brosnan's TED talk, including video of a capuchin rejecting a cucumber in the face of inequity (~2:40 into the talk)

    Video here 
    Credits:

    The Animal Behavior Podcast is created by Matthew Zipple (@MatthewZipple) and Amy Strauss (@avstrauss).

    You can contact us at animalbehaviorpod@gmail.com and find us on Twitter (@AnimalBehavPod).

    Our theme song is by Sally Street (@Rainbow_Road13), assistant professor in evolutionary anthropology at Durham University in the UK. You can find her on Sound Cloud here: https://soundcloud.com/rainbow_road_music.

    Musical transitions by André Gonçalves (@fieryangelsfell), a researcher at the primate research institute at Kyoto University.

    Our logo was designed by Adeline Durand-Monteil (@adelinedurandm), a master’s student in ecology and evolution. You can see more of Adeline's work on her website: https://adelinedurandmonteil.wordpress.com/.

    The Animal Behavior Podcast is produced with support from the Animal Behavior Society (@AnimBehSociety)

    • 49 Min.
    Supplemental Material: Marcela Benítez

    Supplemental Material: Marcela Benítez

    Bonus content to accompany Episode 5.

    We recommend listening to the full episode with Marcela first before listening to this bonus content.

    Let us know what you think about this new bonus format at animalbehaviorpod@gmail.com

    • 24 Min.
    E04: Ted Stankowich on Mammal Weaponry, Aposematic Coloration, and Museum Specimens

    E04: Ted Stankowich on Mammal Weaponry, Aposematic Coloration, and Museum Specimens

    Episode Summary:

    In this episode, Amy speaks with Ted Stankowich (@CSULBMammalLab), an Associate Professor and Associate Chair of Biological Sciences at California State University Long Beach.

    They start out discussing the ecological conditions that favor extreme morphological traits such as armor and weaponry. Then, they talk about Ted’s research into mammal coloration, including the relationship between skunk stripes and their infamous spraying abilities. We also learn about Ted’s involvement in the Urban Wildlife Information Network (@uwi_network), a collaborative alliance of urban wildlife scientists.

    After the break, they discuss using museum collections for teaching, why scientists can benefit from  social media, and Ted’s experience with the tenure process at an R2 institution.

    This week's Two-Minute Takeaway comes from Ummat Somjee (@ummat_s), a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. Read Ummat’s paper about the role of metabolic maintenance costs in the positive allometry of sexually selected traits here (video abstract here).

    Select Papers:

    1. Stankowich, T. & Campbell, L.A. 2016. Living in the danger zone: Exposure to predators and the evolution of spines and body armor in mammals. Evolution 70 (7): 1501-1511.

    2. Caro, T., Izzo, A., Reiner, R.C., Walker, H., & Stankowich, T. 2014. The function of zebra stripes. Nature Communications 5: 3535.

    3. Fisher, K.A. & Stankowich, T. 2018. Antipredator strategies of striped skunks in response to cues of aerial and terrestrial predators. Animal Behaviour 143: 25-34.

    Credits:

    The Animal Behavior Podcast is created by Matthew Zipple (@MatthewZipple) and Amy Strauss (@avstrauss). If you like what you heard, please subscribe wherever you’re listening now, leave us a rating or review, and share us with your friends and colleagues.

    You can contact us at animalbehaviorpod@gmail.com and find us on Twitter (@AnimalBehavPod).

    Our theme song is by Sally Street (@Rainbow_Road13), Assistant Professor in Evolutionary Anthropology at Durham University in the UK. You can find her on Sound Cloud here: https://soundcloud.com/rainbow_road_music.

    Musical transitions by André Gonçalves (@fieryangelsfell), a Researcher at the Primate Research Institute at Kyoto University.

    Our logo was designed by Adeline Durand-Monteil (@adelinedurandm), a Master’s Student in Ecology and Evolution. You can see more of Adeline's work on her website: https://adelinedurandmonteil.wordpress.com/.

    The Animal Behavior Podcast is produced with support from the Animal Behavior Society (@AnimBehSociety).

    • 42 Min.

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