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David Remnick is joined by The New Yorker’s award-winning writers, editors and artists to present a weekly mix of profiles, storytelling, and insightful conversations about the issues that matter — plus an occasional blast of comic genius from the magazine’s legendary Shouts and Murmurs page. The New Yorker has set a standard in journalism for generations and The New Yorker Radio Hour gives it a voice on public radio for the first time. Produced by The New Yorker and WNYC Studios.
WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin, Nancy and many more.
© WNYC Studios

The New Yorker Radio Hour WNYC

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    • 4.3 • 23 Bewertungen

David Remnick is joined by The New Yorker’s award-winning writers, editors and artists to present a weekly mix of profiles, storytelling, and insightful conversations about the issues that matter — plus an occasional blast of comic genius from the magazine’s legendary Shouts and Murmurs page. The New Yorker has set a standard in journalism for generations and The New Yorker Radio Hour gives it a voice on public radio for the first time. Produced by The New Yorker and WNYC Studios.
WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin, Nancy and many more.
© WNYC Studios

    A Rift over Racism Divides the Southern Baptist Convention, Plus, the Fallout from Gamestop

    A Rift over Racism Divides the Southern Baptist Convention, Plus, the Fallout from Gamestop

    The largest Protestant denomination in America is in crisis over the group’s reluctance to acknowledge systemic racism; our reporter talks with the Reverend Dwight McKissic, who considered himself a loyalist but may have reached a breaking point. Plus, our producer looks at the GameStop squeeze of last winter and tries to figure out the motives of the small investors on r/WallStreetBets. Are they out for vengeance on the Man? Are they after lulz? Or are they just trying to make a buck?

    • 33 Min.
    Jon M. Chu on “In the Heights”

    Jon M. Chu on “In the Heights”

    It’s easy to see why the director Jon M. Chu was adamant that the release of “In the Heights” wait until this summer, when more people could see it in theatres: it’s big, it’s colorful, the dance sequences are complex—it’s a spectacle in the best sense of the term. “In the Heights,” based on Lin-Manuel Miranda’s hit stage musical, is a love letter to the largely Latino community in Washington Heights, in upper Manhattan. The characters are dreaming big and wrestling with what happens when those dreams start to pull them away from the neighborhood. For Chu, who directed the enormous hit “Crazy Rich Asians,” directing the film was a risk—it’s said that Miranda teased him by writing “Don’t fuck this up” on his copy of the script. As an Asian-American from California, Chu “was already one step removed from this neighborhood,” he tells David Remnick. “How do you make sure you don’t miss a detail? The director is probably the only person on set who can stop everything and say, ‘Let’s discuss this.’ . . . That’s what made me nervous, making sure I was always present to hear those things.”

    • 16 Min.
    Yo-Yo Ma and Emanuel Ax on Beethoven’s Politics of the Cello

    Yo-Yo Ma and Emanuel Ax on Beethoven’s Politics of the Cello

    Yo-Yo Ma and Emanuel Ax have both been playing Beethoven’s Cello Sonata No. 3 in A Major for over forty years. But it took a global pandemic for the two of them to fully understand it. “This is such open, hopeful music,” Ax said. But when Beethoven dedicated the original piece to a friend, he signed the manuscript, “amid tears and sorrow.” Beethoven, Ma and Ax reflected, finished the sonata during a tumultuous period in which Napoleon was at war with Austria and the composer was losing his hearing. “I thought this was a good piece for this moment,” Ma told The New Yorker’s music critic Alex Ross. “Because people are suffering, and we do think that music can give comfort.” The musicians spoke to Ross and performed from an empty concert hall as part of the New Yorker Festival. 

     

    The segment originally aired November 13, 2020.

    • 21 Min.
    A Vaccinated Day at the Ballpark, and Sarah Schulman on ACT-UP

    A Vaccinated Day at the Ballpark, and Sarah Schulman on ACT-UP

    The staff writer Patricia Marx checks out the new vaccinated sections at New York’s Major League Baseball parks. The author and activist Sarah Schulman talks with David Remnick about her new book on the early years of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power. The group’s radical tactics forced changes in government policy and transformed how America saw gay people and AIDS patients.

    • 28 Min.
    Looking Back at the Year of Protest Since the Death of George Floyd

    Looking Back at the Year of Protest Since the Death of George Floyd

    We look back on the year since the murder of George Floyd galvanized the nation. David Remnick talks with Vanita Gupta, the No. 3 official in the Justice Department, who is charged with delivering on President Biden’s bold promises to address racial injustice. A Minneapolis activist explains why it is so hard to abolish the police. Plus, Hilton Als on why America finally rose up against long-standing abuses of Black people.

    • 34 Min.
    Spike Lee on the Knicks’ Resurgence

    Spike Lee on the Knicks’ Resurgence

    Spike Lee is one of the most passionate and committed fans of the New York Knicks—not to mention one of the most celebrated filmmakers of our time. Underdogs for many years, the Knicks are enjoying a renaissance, and Lee is in his glory. David Remnick and Vinson Cunningham called Lee to talk about a life of fandom, the politics of activism in the N.B.A. and the N.F.L., and Lee’s multipart documentary about life in New York since September 11th, which will be released to mark the twentieth anniversary of the attacks.

Kundenrezensionen

4.3 von 5
23 Bewertungen

23 Bewertungen

kevanon ,

Judas and the black messiah

Please appreciate that not all your listeners are American and fluent in American history and may appreciate that you give a heads up that you are going to reveal the end of a movie that they would liked to watched without that reveal.

The_Hof_82 ,

New Format

One of my favourite Podcasts. Although i dont like the new format. I think it was much better when the show was 1 hour long with diffrent segments. Since the show is subdivided in diffrent shorter podcast, i found myself not listening as much to as i used to. When it was one hour i tuned in weekly, didnt matter what concent was and i discovered a lot of stuff. Now not as much anymore.

Anyone But Buster ,

Utter rubbish

Should be called The liberal-angst radio hour it's so drenched in concern for minorities: the black woman talking at monotonous (over three episodes!) length about her trials and tribulations, the banal interview with the Latino journalist (here's a tip: soft-toss questions do not make for fascinating listening), etc etc etc.
Deleted my subscription after three episodes of drivel. How I miss you already, New Yorker Out Loud.

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