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Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

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Weekly podcasts from Science Magazine, the world's leading journal of original scientific research, global news, and commentary.

    An oasis of biodiversity a Mexican desert, and making sound from heat

    An oasis of biodiversity a Mexican desert, and making sound from heat

    First up this week, News Intern Rodrigo Pérez-Ortega talks with host Meagan Cantwell about an oasis of biodiversity in the striking blue pools of Cuatro Ciénegas, a basin in northern Mexico. Researchers have published dozens of papers exploring the unique microorganisms that thrive in this area, while at the same time fighting large agricultural industries draining the precious water from the pools.

    David Tatnell, a postgraduate researcher at the University of Exeter, talks with host Sarah Crespi about using heat to make sound, a phenomenon known as thermoacoustics. Just like the sound of fire or thunder, sudden changes in temperature can create sound waves. In his team’s paper in Science Advances, Tatnell and colleagues describe a thermoacoustic speaker that uses thin, heated films to make sound. This approach cuts out the crosstalk seen in mechanical speakers and allows for extreme miniaturization of sound production. In the ultrasound range, arrays of thermoacoustic speakers could improve acoustic levitation and ultrasound imaging. In the hearing range, the speakers could be made extremely small, flexible, and even transparent.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

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    [Image: David Jaramillo; Music: Jeffrey Cook]

    • 20 分钟
    Stopping the spread of COVID-19, and arctic adaptations in sled dogs

    Stopping the spread of COVID-19, and arctic adaptations in sled dogs

    Kimberly Prather, an atmospheric chemist at the University of California, San Diego, who studies how ocean waves disperse virus-laden aerosols, joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about how she became an outspoken advocate for using masks to prevent coronavirus transmission. A related insight she wrote for Science has been downloaded more than 1 million times.

    Read Science’s coronavirus coverage.

    Mikkel Sinding, a postdoctoral fellow at Trinity College Dublin, talks sled dog genes with Sarah. After comparing the genomes of modern dogs, Greenland sled dogs, and an ancient dog jaw bone found on a remote Siberian island where dogs may have pulled sleds some 9500 years ago, they found that modern Greenland dogs—which are still used to pull sleds today—have much in common with this ancient Siberian ancestor. Those similarities include genes related to eating high-fat diets and cold-sensing genes previously identified in woolly mammoths.

    In this month’s book segment, Kiki Sanford talks with Rutger Bregman about his book, Humankind: A Hopeful History, which outlines a shift in the thinking of many social scientists to a view of humans as more peaceful than warlike.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

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    • 40 分钟
    Coronavirus spreads financial turmoil to universities, and a drone that fights mosquito-borne illnesses

    Coronavirus spreads financial turmoil to universities, and a drone that fights mosquito-borne illnesses

    Senior Correspondent Jeffrey Mervis joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about how universities are dealing with the financial crunch brought on by the coronavirus. Jeff discusses how big research universities are balancing their budgets as federal grants continue to flow, but endowments are down and so is the promise of state funding.

    Read all our coronavirus coverage.

    Mosquito-borne infections like Zika, dengue, malaria, and chikungunya cause millions of deaths each year. Nicole Culbert and colleges write this week in Science Robotics about a new way to deal with deadly mosquitoes—using drones. The drones are designed to drop hundreds of thousands of sterile male mosquitoes in areas with high risk of mosquito-borne illness. The idea is that sterile male mosquitoes will mate with females and the females then lay infertile eggs, which causes the population to decline. They found this drone-based approach is cheaper and more efficient than other methods of releasing sterile mosquitoes and does not have the problems associated with pesticide-based eradication efforts such as resistance and off-target effects.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 24 分钟
    The facts on COVID-19 contact tracing apps, and benefits of returning sea otters to the wild

    The facts on COVID-19 contact tracing apps, and benefits of returning sea otters to the wild

    Staff Writer Kelly Servick joins host Sarah Crespi to talk about the ins and outs of coronavirus contact tracing apps—what they do, how they work, and how to calculate whether they are crushing the curve.

    Read all our coronavirus coverage.

    Edward Gregr, a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Resources, Environment, and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, talks with Sarah about the controversial reintroduction of sea otters to the Northern Pacific Ocean—their home for centuries, before the fur trade nearly wiped out the apex predator in the late 1800s. Gregr brings a unique cost-benefit perspective to his analysis, and finds many trade-offs with economic implications for fisheries For example, sea otters eat shellfish like urchins and crabs, depressing the shellfishing industry; but their diet encourages the growth of kelp forests, which in turn provide a habitat for economically important finfish, like salmon and rockfish. Read a related commentary article.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 25 分钟
    Why men may have more severe COVID-19 symptoms, and using bacteria to track contaminated food

    Why men may have more severe COVID-19 symptoms, and using bacteria to track contaminated food

    First up this week, Staff Writer Meredith Wadman talks with host Sarah Crespi about how male sex hormones may play a role in higher levels of severe coronavirus infections in men. New support for this idea comes from a study showing high levels of male pattern baldness in hospitalized COVID-19 patients.

    Read all our coronavirus coverage.

    Next, Jason Qian, a Ph.D. student in the systems biology department at Harvard Medical School, joins Sarah to talk about an object-tracking system that uses bacterial spores engineered with unique DNA barcodes. The inactivated spores can be sprayed on anything from lettuce, to wood, to sand and later be scraped off and read out using a CRISPR-based detection system. Spraying these DNA-based identifiers on such things as vegetables could help trace foodborne illnesses back to their source. Read a related commentary piece. 

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 25 分钟
    A rare condition associated with coronavirus in children, and tracing glaciers by looking at the ocean floor

    A rare condition associated with coronavirus in children, and tracing glaciers by looking at the ocean floor

    First up this week, Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel talks with host Sarah Crespi about a rare inflammatory response in children that has appeared in a number of COVID-19 hot spots.

    Next, Julian Dowdeswell, director of the Scott Polar Research Institute and professor of physical geography at the University of Cambridge, talks with producer Meagan Cantwell about tracing the retreat of Antarctica's glaciers by examining the ocean floor.

    Finally, Kiki Sanford interviews author Danny Dorling about his new book, Slowdown: The End of the Great Acceleration―and Why It’s Good for the Planet, the Economy, and Our Lives.

    This week’s episode was produced with help from Podigy.

    Listen to previous podcasts.

    About the Science Podcast

    Download a transcript (PDF).

    • 40 分钟

用户评论

4.4(满分 5 分)
63 个评分

63 个评分

新酱Yellow

内容有点冗长

如果是为了听力和了解信息 是很适合的资源 语速口音都还可以 个人觉得语速有点慢 可以手动调快 但是 如果是来学点东西的 这里面的内容编排有点松散 可能 主持人风格导致的吧 以上

zebra_12345

下载慢

加载下载太慢了 根本听不了

十一口金戈

法国人科普的风格

语速慢?看来是我听力太菜了……

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