298 episodes

Jason Weiser tells stories from myths, legends, and folklore that have shaped cultures throughout history. Some, like the stories of Aladdin, King Arthur, and Hercules are stories you think you know, but with surprising origins. Others are stories you might not have heard, but really should. All the stories are sourced from world folklore, but retold for modern ears. These are stories of wizards, knights, Vikings, dragons, princesses, and kings from the time when the world beyond the map was a dangerous and wonderful place.

Myths and Legend‪s‬ Jason Weiser, Carissa Weiser / Bardic

    • Books
    • 5.0 • 7 Ratings

Jason Weiser tells stories from myths, legends, and folklore that have shaped cultures throughout history. Some, like the stories of Aladdin, King Arthur, and Hercules are stories you think you know, but with surprising origins. Others are stories you might not have heard, but really should. All the stories are sourced from world folklore, but retold for modern ears. These are stories of wizards, knights, Vikings, dragons, princesses, and kings from the time when the world beyond the map was a dangerous and wonderful place.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
7 Ratings

7 Ratings

Marja Morevna ,

Modern language, ancient tales, still great to listen to:)

Like this so far a lot!
There's a wide variety of stories covered, the re-telling sounds "modern" enough so as not to bore a listener who's new to the realm of myths and legends and still manages to be accurate enough so as not to annoy the ones even previously interested in the tales.
Also, the narration is very nice to listen to:)
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(below the line:)
I came here while waiting for the Netflix Witcher this autumn (2019), and so the only (so far) episodes I've listened to are #5A,B, which are your first ones of Slavic folklore. I was already vaguely familiar with the tales, but first I was a little confused with the pronunciation. Not complaining, just saying. Although I don't speak Russian, I believe the stress in "Koshtchej" is either on both syllables equally strong or even stronger on the second one. Your pronunciation sounds more like "Koshi" to me. As I said, a little confusing when you only read the names previously. Pointing this out only because it is probably the case with the majority of other Slavic names too - all the syllables need to be pronounced for the name to be understood:)

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