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Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox is a weekly podcast that shares how to put the teachings of Buddhism into practice to be happier, more peaceful, or to become the spiritual warrior this world so desperately needs. JoAnn Fox has been teaching Buddhism for 17 years and does so with kindness and humor.

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox JoAnn Fox: Buddhist Teacher

    • Buddhismus

Buddhism for Everyone with JoAnn Fox is a weekly podcast that shares how to put the teachings of Buddhism into practice to be happier, more peaceful, or to become the spiritual warrior this world so desperately needs. JoAnn Fox has been teaching Buddhism for 17 years and does so with kindness and humor.

    Episode 69 - The Magical Practice of Taking and Giving

    Episode 69 - The Magical Practice of Taking and Giving

    The ancient meditation known as the ‘the magical practice of taking and giving’ is a profound method to:
     
    transform our suffering into a tool to help others purify our negative karma make our mind strong and resilient  develop universal compassion eventually attain enlightenment  
    In this episode, we learn how to do this practice formally, seated, as well as in daily life. This practice can be done with our eyes open, whenever we see someone suffering. It can help us make our own suffering meaningful and easier to bear, and even purify the karmic causes of it. 
     
    Practicing what one shouldn’t, 
    Not practicing what one should, 
    Having abandoned the goal, 
    Clinging to what is dear, 
    One comes to envy those who practice. (209)*
    —Buddha, The Dhammapada
     
    References
     
    Buddha. The Dhammapada, translated by Gil Fronsdale. (2011). Shambala, pp. 56.
     

    • 39 Min.
    Episode 68 - How To Develop Love For All Beings

    Episode 68 - How To Develop Love For All Beings

    This episode is devoted to the meditation of loving-kindness, a profound method to develop love for all living beings. It creates immeasurable good karma, diminishes ill will toward others and creates the cause of our own enlightenment. Scientific research has also been done on the results of people practicing this meditation. 
    Research indicates these benefits:
    Increases positive emotions. One study showed that seven weeks of practicing the loving-kindness meditation increased multiple positive emotions including love, joy, contentment, gratitude, pride, hope, interest, amusement, and awe. Quiets your inner critic Strengthens capacity for empathy Decreases migraines Increases compassion  Slows the aging process. In another eye-opening study researchers found that women with experience in loving-kindness meditation had relatively longer telomere length (a biological marker of aging) when compared to age-matched controls. Loving-kindness Prayer Within the Meditation 
    May you be happy

    May you be well
    May your body and mind be at ease
    May all good fortune and successes in life come to you
    May you be healthy
    May you have all the wealth you need
    May your happiness increase day by day 
    May you never know a day of sadness
    May you experience the supreme happiness of enlightenment. 
     
    Verse 206-208 of The Dhammapada
    It’s good to see the noble ones; 
    Their company is always a delight. 
    Free from the sight of fools,
    One would constantly be happy.
     
    One who keeps company with fools
    Will grieve for a long, long time. 
    Living with fools is painful,
    As is living with foes.
    Living with the wise is delightful,
    Like relatives gathered together.
     
    Therefore:
    You should always follow a good, intelligent person
    Who is wise, insightful, learned,
    Committed to virtue, dutiful and noble, 
    As the moon follows the path of the stars. (208)
    —Buddha, The Dhammapada
    References
    Abrahmson, L. 6 Amazing Benefits of Loving Kindness Meditation Backed by Science. Lifehack (blog post). Retrieved from https://www.lifehack.org/361244/6-amazing-benefits-loving-kindness-meditation-backed-science
    Buddha. The Dhammapada, translated by Gil Fronsdale. (2011). Shambala, pp. 54-55.

    • 39 Min.
    Episode 67 - Kindfulness

    Episode 67 - Kindfulness

    To bring more joy and lessen the stress in our lives, we can turn to the practice of kindfulness. Mindfulness, the conscious awareness of our thoughts and intentions, tuned into ways to be kind to others is ‘kindfulness.’ First coined by the monk Ajahn Brahm, kindfulness is a gentle way to more align our life with the law of karma. According to the law of karma, every act of kindness creates the cause for our own future happiness. Being kind usually makes us feel pretty good in the moment too! 
    Research also indicates that kindness has many good effects on our heath and even slows the aging process! Dr David Hamilton, author of The Five Side-Effects Of Kindness, says, “Being kind generates the “kindness” hormone oxytocin, which also happens to be a major cardiovascular hormone. It keeps the arteries clear and lowers blood pressure by reducing levels of harmful free radicals and inflammation, which cause disease. These are also the main culprits for causing ageing to our cells, so you could also say that kindness slows the ageing process.”
    Tasting the flavor 
    Of solitude and peace,
    One becomes free of distress and evil,
    Drinking the flavor of Dharma joy. (Verse 205)
    —Buddha, The Dhammapada
    References
    Buddha. The Dhammapada, translated by Gil Fronsdale. (2011). Shambala, pp. 54.
    Carlyle, R. (2018, May 20). Kindfulness: It’s the new twist on mindfulness — being consciously kind to others. The best thing? It’s good for you, too. Retrieved from https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-5750811/Kindfulness-new-twist-mindfulness-consciously-kind-others.html

    • 36 Min.
    Episode 66: How to Practice Contentment

    Episode 66: How to Practice Contentment

    For many, the practice of contentment is a completely new idea. Learning, practicing and becoming good at contentment means  we come to enjoy our life more and more.  In this episode we discover how to practice contentment with ourselves, other people, and our life. 
    Link to the Character Strength Survey mentioned, https://www.viacharacter.org
    Health is the foremost possession, 
    Contentment, the foremost wealth,
    Trust, the foremost kinship, 
    And Nirvana, the foremost happiness.
    —Buddha, The Dhammapada
    References
    Buddha. The Dhammapada, translated by Gil Fronsdale. (2011). Shambala, pp. 54.
    Kaufman, S. (Host). (2019, Mar. 21) “Ignite Your Character Strengths” [Podcast]. The Psychology Podcast. Retrieved from https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-psychology-podcast/id942777522?i=1000432732066
    McGrath, R., & Niemiec, R. (2020). “VIA Survey” [website]. Retrieved from https://www.viacharacter.org
     

    • 37 Min.
    Episode 65 - Radiate Peace

    Episode 65 - Radiate Peace

    What if we could tune our body and mind, like a fine instrument, to peacefulness? What if we could be calm, relaxed and peaceful all the time? In this episode we return to a simple, effective mindfulness practice to de-stress. We also try to strengthen our motivation to become a peaceful person beyond ourselves alone. 
     
    Mindfulness Practice to De-stress 
     
    Aspire to become a calm and peaceful person, even in challenging situations. Try to be mindful of whether you’re feeling calm and when you start to become tense. Calm yourself. When you start to feel tension or stress, turn toward calming yourself—rather than doing anything to affect the situation. This is vital. When you notice tension and stress, start breathing deeply from the diaphragm, feeling your stomach expand. Or, if possible, close your eyes and begin a brief breathing meditation (see below).  Breathe deeply and say to yourself “calm” “relaxed”. Try to tune your body to these feelings...calm...relaxed.  Continue this Diaphragmatic breathing or a breathing meditation until you feel relaxed. This might take only a minute or it might take much longer. Remember the world is empty and dreamlike. Put a little smile on your face. Try to have fun and find joy in things. Keep trying this mindfulness practice and calming technique whenever you need it. You’ll get better at with practice, and eventually you will be able to tame your mind and be calm all day.   
    Relaxing Meditation 
     
    If you find yourself getting stressed—and have time and space for a five minute meditation—this can help you reset your state to calm and relaxed. 
     
    Close your eyes. Check that you have a nice straight back. Breathe through nostrils. You can put your hands in the mudra of meditative equipoise. Place your hands in your lap, the right hand resting in the left, and the thumbs gently touching forming a bridge.  Breathe deeply from your diaphragm. Count, starting at one, as you breathe in. 1….2….3….4….5 Count as you exhale, but exhale more slowly as your breathe out. 1….2….3….4….5….6…..7….8…..9….10 You can meditate for only as long as it takes your body and mind to enter a more peaceful state.  When you arise from your meditation, look at your experiences as a projection of your mind, like a dream.  Try to stay peaceful. Relax. Enjoy. Hunger is the foremost illness; 
    Saṇkhāras the foremost suffering. 
    For one who knows this as it really is, 
    Nirvana is the foremost happiness. (203)*
     
    References
     
    Buddha. The Dhammapada, translated by Gil Fronsdale. (2011). Shambala, pp. 54.
     

    • 35 Min.
    Episode 64 - Ready to De-stess?

    Episode 64 - Ready to De-stess?

    Almost everyone wants to be less stressed and more peaceful. Even as our modern world ramps up the external stressors, we can learn to make ourselves calm and relaxed. The Buddha said, “there is no happiness higher than peace”. This episode guides us through a simple process to become more peaceful and to de-stress. 
    Mindfulness Practice to De-stress 
    Aspire to become a calm and peaceful person, even in challenging situations. Try to be mindful of whether you’re feeling calm. Notice when you start to feel tense. Calm yourself. When you start to feel tension or stress, turn toward calming yourself—rather than doing anything to affect the situation. This is vital. When you notice tension and stress, start breathing deeply from the diaphragm, feeling your stomach expand. Or, if possible, close your eyes and begin a brief breathing meditation (see below).  Breathe deeply and say to yourself “calm” “relaxed”. Try to tune your body to these feelings...calm...relaxed.  Continue this Diaphragmatic breathing or a breathing meditation until you feel relaxed. This might take only a minute or it might take much longer. Remember the world is empty and dreamlike. Put a little smile on your face. Try to have fun and find joy in things. Keep trying this mindfulness practice and calming technique whenever you need it. You’ll get better at with practice, and eventually you will be able to tame your mind and be calm all day.  Part 2 Daily Meditation 
    Ideally, meditate every morning. You can do the simple breathing meditation or any meditation you’d like. If you are new to meditating daily, you can meditate for only a few minutes. Or you can meditate for only as long as it takes your body and mind to enter a more peaceful state. Sometimes you might not be able to move your mind to a more relaxed state; no worries, just meditate anyway. Take the seat. Putting effort to begin the day in a state of peace will help you be mindful of peacefulness and help you stay relaxed.  Let the experiences of life dissolve into your peaceful state.  Think of your world as empty, dreamlike. Keep a little smile on your face.  Enjoy everything you can.  There is no fire like lust
    No misfortune like hate,
    No suffering like the aggregates
    And no happiness higher than peace.
    —Buddha, The Dhammapada 
    A Simple Breathing Meditation 
    Sit with your back straight and your shoulders dropped and relaxed. You can put your hands in the mudra of meditative equipoise. To do this, place your hands in your lap with your palms facing upward. Rest your right hand in your left. Touch your thumbs, forming a bridge.  Breathe through your nostrils. Breathe deeply, from your diaphragm. Observe the sensation of your breath at your nostrils.  Instead of paying attention to thoughts, allow your only thought to be watching the breath. Like watching the water lapping at the shore, calm the mind by watching the gentle rise and fall of the breath at your nostrils.  When you exhale, really feel yourself relaxing...deeper and deeper with every exhalation.  When your mind wanders, without judging yourself, bring it back to the breath. References
    Buddha. The Dhammapada, translated by Gil Fronsdale. (2011). Shambala, pp. 54.
     
    Oz, M. (2019), Apr. 11). America’s Doctor: The Dr. Oz Podcast. How to Stress Less [podcast]. Episode 94.
     

    • 39 Min.

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