9 Folgen

The veterans of the civil rights movement made history, but they are eager for you to know something: They didn’t set out to be heroes or icons. On two recent occasions, these brave men and women gathered to reflect on their experiences and the legacy they're leaving. Some of them are names you know, some aren’t — but all of them have stories that need to be told while they're still here to tell them. This series from the “Cape Up” podcast brings you the stories and reflections of some of these leaders, and their lessons on where we go from here.

Cape Up: Voices of the Movement The Washington Post

    • Gesellschaft und Kultur

The veterans of the civil rights movement made history, but they are eager for you to know something: They didn’t set out to be heroes or icons. On two recent occasions, these brave men and women gathered to reflect on their experiences and the legacy they're leaving. Some of them are names you know, some aren’t — but all of them have stories that need to be told while they're still here to tell them. This series from the “Cape Up” podcast brings you the stories and reflections of some of these leaders, and their lessons on where we go from here.

    Passing the baton

    Passing the baton

    "They’re doing it, and they’re making all the mistakes, and they’re doing it right." Civil rights leaders old and young describe how activism is different today than for the leaders of the 1960s movement — but still as important.

    • 24 Min.
    The power of nonviolent resistance

    The power of nonviolent resistance

    "The violence trained me to be nonviolent." A longtime civil rights activist and a leader from a younger generation discuss the tension that exists when discussing the most effective paths to change.

    • 20 Min.
    How music propelled the civil rights movement

    How music propelled the civil rights movement

    "Without songs, we couldn’t have had a movement." Civil rights activists describe how in jail, music was the one thing that couldn’t be taken from them — and it propelled the movement forward.

    • 20 Min.
    How segregationist George Wallace became a model for racial reconciliation

    How segregationist George Wallace became a model for racial reconciliation

    "He was the epitome of the legacy of a slave master, and this man kept my people down." Rep. Barbara Lee and Peggy Wallace Kennedy, daughter of former Alabama governor George Wallace, recount how Wallace renounced his segregationist views.

    • 16 Min.
    Women of the civil rights movement

    Women of the civil rights movement

    "The movement never would have happened had it not been for these heroic women." Rep. Barbara Lee and Andrew Young explain why women are so often eliminated from civil rights stories — and why that’s so wrong.

    • 23 Min.
    The story of Bloody Sunday and today’s pilgrimage to Selma

    The story of Bloody Sunday and today’s pilgrimage to Selma

    "I called it good trouble. I called it necessary trouble." Congressman John Lewis and others who were there recall marching across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., to protest the suppression of black votes.

    • 25 Min.

Top‑Podcasts in Gesellschaft und Kultur

Zuhörer haben auch Folgendes abonniert:

Mehr von The Washington Post