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In-depth weekly analysis of US oil policy news from S&P Global Platts' senior editors covering the capitol. Hosted by senior oil news editors Brian Scheid and Meghan Gordon.

Capitol Crude: The US Oil Policy Podcast S&P Global Platts

    • Wirtschaftsnachrichten

In-depth weekly analysis of US oil policy news from S&P Global Platts' senior editors covering the capitol. Hosted by senior oil news editors Brian Scheid and Meghan Gordon.

    Is peak Permian output nearing as capital flight risk looms?

    Is peak Permian output nearing as capital flight risk looms?

    As rising US oil production allows the Trump administration to rewrite foreign policy, what if projections for its continued growth are wrong?
    Adam Waterous, CEO of Waterous Energy Fund, thinks North American oil and gas producers face severe capital flight risks in the coming years that could result in US crude output falling by 2 million b/d or more. He says the sector is experiencing a prolonged downturn unlike anything it as has seen before – not another typical boom/bust cycle of the past.
    Waterous thinks the sector is in only the second or third inning of consolidation that will be required to improve rates of return and please capital markets.

    • 20 Min.
    Soleimani has been killed, how will Iran respond?

    Soleimani has been killed, how will Iran respond?

    Crude prices have surged, Iran has vowed revenge and analysts expect another attack on energy infrastructure in the Middle East, potentially impacting global oil supply significantly in the near term.
    On this Platts Capitol Crude we talk to Behnam Ben Taleblu, a senior fellow with the Foundation for Defense of Democracies and an Iran expert, on the policy and market impacts of the US killing of Iran’s top military commander, General Qassim Soleimani, in airstrikes in Baghdad.
    Taleblu says Iran will likely target more infrastructure, both onshore and off, similar to the Abqaiq attacks in September, as Soleimani’s death has compounded the escalation between the US and Iran. Taleblu also talks about the likelihood of a military conflict between the two nations, the Trump administration’s evolving endgame with its Iran policy, and why US shale and relatively steady oil prices may have emboldened the White House’s strategy towards Tehran.

    • 17 Min.
    Should the US government spend much, much more on carbon capture?

    Should the US government spend much, much more on carbon capture?

    Carbon-capture projects are economically unviable at the moment and will need a major increase in government spending for wide-scale deployment, says John Minge, former chairman and president of BP America.

    On today’s Platts Capitol Crude, Minge talks about the policy changes needed, including expansion of federal tax incentives, to build out the carbon-capture technology that many point to as one path to address the release of greenhouse gases from growing oil and natural gas development.

    Development is complicated, Minge says, as infrastructure to accommodate movement of an equivalent of 13 million b/d of oil will need to be built and there’s no clear evidence that widespread carbon-capture projects would ever turn a profit. Minge led the development of the National Petroleum Council’s recent carbon capture, use and storage report, an 18-month study requested by former Energy Secretary Rick Perry.

    • 14 Min.
    Sizing up the oil market's top geopolitical risks in 2020

    Sizing up the oil market's top geopolitical risks in 2020

    The oil market is closing out 2019 with a smaller geopolitical risk premium despite the September attack on Saudi Arabia's Abqaiq facility exposing a staggering supply vulnerability.
    Greg Priddy, Stratfor's director of global energy and Middle East, argues the oil market can no longer hold onto a risk premium, between hedging and the responsiveness of US shale production. He said a sharp premium would only return in the event of a major and prolonged oil supply disruption.
    Priddy walked us through other potential geopolitical hot spots next year, including a tinderbox in the Middle East, OPEC's oversupply woes, the "festering" US/China trade dispute, and the US presidential election.

    • 24 Min.
    As majors move in, US shale’s growth spurt ends

    As majors move in, US shale’s growth spurt ends

    US oil producers seem to be at an inflection point, where efficiency gains are waning, output growth is slowing and capital is drying up, Antoine Halff tells Platts Capitol Crude.
    On this week’s episode, Halff talks rig counts, well completions and flaring, the likely impact of deeper OPEC cuts, and he forecasts the path forward for US oil output.
    Halff also talks about why lagging government data may be selling a false narrative that the US is a swing producer and details his working theory on why OPEC needs volatile oil prices.
    Halff, the founder of Kayrros, a data analytics firm, was previously chief oil analyst at the International Energy Agency and lead industry economist at the US Energy Information Administration.

    • 19 Min.
    Will OPEC+ stick to its latest oil production cuts?

    Will OPEC+ stick to its latest oil production cuts?

    OPEC, Russia and its nine other oil-producing allies have agreed to fresh supply cuts, but how much compliance will they achieve in the next three months? Former Capitol Crude host Herman Wang returns with details of the deal struck Friday in Vienna. The contentious talks featured a walkout by Angola and hardball by Iraq and Russia. Saudi Aramco’s massive initial public offering hung over the events, but US President Donald Trump’s oil tweets stayed home.

    • 6 Min.

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