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Guests are invited to choose the eight records they would take to a desert island.

Desert Island Discs: Archive 2000-2005 BBC

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Guests are invited to choose the eight records they would take to a desert island.

    Kim Cattrall

    Kim Cattrall

    Sue Lawley's castaway is the actress Kim Cattrall. Kim Cattrall became a household name in her forties as a result of playing man-eater, defiant singleton and PR mogul Samantha Jones in Sex and the City. She is about to star in the play Whose Life is it Anyway? in the West End of London.

    She was born in Liverpool but grew up in Canada and decided to be an actress at a young age. She says a formative experience was appearing in a school play Piffle It's Only a Sniffle when she took the role of a cold germ which had to infect the other children by tickling them with a feather until they sneezed. She spent time in drama schools in Canada, Liverpool and New York and says now that her first love is theatre - and her film roles allow her to feed her theatre habit.

    [Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]

    Favourite track: My Favourite Things by John Coltrane
    Book: An English Dictionary
    Luxury: Fragrant body cream

    • 36 Min.
    Engelbert Humperdinck

    Engelbert Humperdinck

    Sue Lawley's castaway is the singer Engelbert Humperdinck. Engelbert Humperdinck is one of Britain's most successful entertainers. He is known as the King of Romance and has been at the top of the showbusiness ladder for nearly 40 years - selling more than 130 million records including sixty-four gold and 23 platinum albums.

    He was born Arnold George (Gerry) Dorsey in 1936 in India and was one of 10 children. At the age of 10, his family returned to the UK and Leicester. At 17 he began performing in clubs and pubs. In 1965 his manager changed his name to Engelbert Humperdinck but it was still two years before his chance arrived. His big break came in April 1967 when Dickie Valentine was ill and Engelbert took his slot on the show Sunday Night at the London Palladium. His single Release Me flew off the shelves staying in the charts for 56 weeks. He went off to conquer America and there he shared the bill with Dean Martin and Frank Sinatra while he counted Elvis Presley as a close friend. He starts a new UK tour in February next year and his autobiography Engelbert - What's in a Name? was published this year.

    [Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]

    Favourite track: Return to Me by Dean Martin
    Book: What's in a Name? by Engelbert Humperdinck
    Luxury: A saxophone

    • 35 Min.
    John Fortune

    John Fortune

    Sue Lawley's castaway this week is John Fortune.

    John Fortune is one of Britain's most respected and enduring satirists. For the past 12 years he has been half of the award-winning double act, The Long Johns, with John Bird, that have brought a sharper political edge to Bremner, Bird and Fortune. As a result of the act, they have been named the Best Opposition by The Oldie Magazine and are Bafta award winners. It is a return to the forefront of political satire for John Fortune - he had joined Peter Cook in setting up The Establishment Club in the 1960s and had taken the review to America to widespread acclaim and returned to Britain to write for, among others, BBC Three and Not So Much a Programme, More a Way of Life.

    [Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]

    Favourite track: Piano Sonata No 30 in E Major by Ludwig van Beethoven
    Book: The Leopard (In Italian & English) by Giuseppe di Lampedusa
    Luxury: A rug made by the Baluch people from Afghanistan

    • 36 Min.
    Sir Bobby Robson

    Sir Bobby Robson

    Sue Lawley's castaway this week is Sir Bobby Robson. Sir Bobby Robson is one of the most enduring and popular faces in football. For more than five decades he has dedicated his life to the game - as a player and manager. As a small boy growing up in a mining village in County Durham, he learnt his ball skills by playing football in the streets and backyard with his four brothers.

    By the time he was 15, Bobby knew he had a particular gift and was attracting the attention of the local talent scouts. But, despite being offered a professional place by his home team of Newcastle, he decided to head south to Fulham, where he thought he'd have a greater chance to shine. He went on to play successfully for Fulham and West Bromwich Albion and earned twenty England caps before an ankle injury cut short his international career. He then managed Ipswich Town for 13 very successful years - leaving when he was offered the opportunity manage the England squad. After a successful career in Europe he returned to Britain in 1999 to manage Newcastle but was sacked early in the season. Despite health problems, he says he hasn't given up hope of finding another club to manage.

    [Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]

    Favourite track: It Was a Very Good Year by Robbie Williams and Frank Sinatra
    Book: The works of historian John Keegan: The First World War & the Second World War collected into one volume by John Keegan
    Luxury: Sun lounger with canopy to protect him from the sun

    • 36 Min.
    Tracey Emin

    Tracey Emin

    Sue Lawley's castaway this week is the artist Tracey Emin.

    Tracey Emin is one of the most successful and controversial artists to emerge during the 1990s. Her work was championed early on by influential art dealer Jay Jopling and later by the collector Charles Saatchi. Her work is highly autobiographical and confessional. A talented drawer and painter, she has attracted most attention for her art installations - including her tent, Everyone I Have Ever Slept With and the Turner Prize-nominated My Bed. Her art is adored and condemned in equal measure, but wherever she exhibits she attracts queues and has a room at Tate Britain dedicated to her work. She was brought up in Margate and she has recently finished a film, Top Spot, which reflects her own experiences.

    [Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]

    Favourite track: Young Americans by David Bowie
    Book: Ethics by Spinoza
    Luxury: A pen which would never run out

    • 33 Min.
    Clive Stafford Smith

    Clive Stafford Smith

    Sue Lawley's castaway this week is the death row lawyer Clive Stafford Smith.

    Clive Stafford Smith spent more than 25 years representing people on death row. He's saved hundreds of lives and counts his clients among his friends. He says his work is his calling - one he was drawn to after writing an essay on capital punishment while at school. Initially he thought it was a history essay and was appalled to find the death sentence was still in use. He planned to become a campaigning journalist, but a summer spent meeting prisoners on death row inmates convinced him that he would be able to achieve more by representing them directly. So he trained in law and set up his own legal practice to enable him to do so. He has received several awards for his work including, in 2002, the OBE.

    [Taken from the original programme material for this archive edition of Desert Island Discs]

    Favourite track: Spem in Alium by Thomas Tallis
    Book: The Koran (in Arabic and English)
    Luxury: My computer

    • 33 Min.

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