23 Min.

Examples of Serious Games for Online Facilitators Corporate Training Tools Podcast

    • Management

What are specific examples of serious games for online trainings? What are good check-ins, energizers and "main dish" serious games?
All games have been tested in their digital version by us and we definitely recommend them. 
1) Great Check-in game: show a picture about // emojii check-in / check-out (a small step for them) Marius' Check-in Game: Draw a battery on the whiteboard & let all participants draw a line into the battery indicating how much energy they have today / right now / this morning.  As a "respectable" game to transport a topic / learning: Consider the "Change Game" Step 1) Tell all participants to turn their camera off Step 2) Give them ~20 sec. to change "something (up to 3 aspects) in your scene / about your appearance" Have them turn their camera on: Ask the group: “What changes can you spot with the others? After two or three rounds, some learners will notice how they find it harder to introduce change, some find it easier. Debrief with emotional questions or other question types you will find in Julian's free "debriefing cube" (Link below) A good final question for the change game: ”What happened to the changes!” → sustainability

“Is there a story when things went wrong in your online facilitation? 
Watch out for performance ceilings Check the performance from the participants side (Is there one person representing a “bottleneck”) never overload your electronic board (such as mural.co, miro.com or klaxoon.com) Keep learner's bandwidth limitations in mind  
Golden nugget: What is the one thing most online-facilitators are not aware of ?
Checking for understanding is harder online: I will answer 2 questions before we start. (Before we start primes them.) Who wants to ask me one of two questions now? Do you have the instructions downloaded to your machine? Use some equialent to J Millers “Bat Signal” on the common board  
 
Links for our listeners
http://SeriousGamesPodcast.com
 
Tools for our listeners
http://TheDebriefingCube.com
 

What are specific examples of serious games for online trainings? What are good check-ins, energizers and "main dish" serious games?
All games have been tested in their digital version by us and we definitely recommend them. 
1) Great Check-in game: show a picture about // emojii check-in / check-out (a small step for them) Marius' Check-in Game: Draw a battery on the whiteboard & let all participants draw a line into the battery indicating how much energy they have today / right now / this morning.  As a "respectable" game to transport a topic / learning: Consider the "Change Game" Step 1) Tell all participants to turn their camera off Step 2) Give them ~20 sec. to change "something (up to 3 aspects) in your scene / about your appearance" Have them turn their camera on: Ask the group: “What changes can you spot with the others? After two or three rounds, some learners will notice how they find it harder to introduce change, some find it easier. Debrief with emotional questions or other question types you will find in Julian's free "debriefing cube" (Link below) A good final question for the change game: ”What happened to the changes!” → sustainability

“Is there a story when things went wrong in your online facilitation? 
Watch out for performance ceilings Check the performance from the participants side (Is there one person representing a “bottleneck”) never overload your electronic board (such as mural.co, miro.com or klaxoon.com) Keep learner's bandwidth limitations in mind  
Golden nugget: What is the one thing most online-facilitators are not aware of ?
Checking for understanding is harder online: I will answer 2 questions before we start. (Before we start primes them.) Who wants to ask me one of two questions now? Do you have the instructions downloaded to your machine? Use some equialent to J Millers “Bat Signal” on the common board  
 
Links for our listeners
http://SeriousGamesPodcast.com
 
Tools for our listeners
http://TheDebriefingCube.com
 

23 Min.