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The Haiti Lab is the first humanities laboratory at the Franklin Humanities Institute. The lab merges research, education, and practical applications of innovative thinking for Haiti's disaster recovery and for the expansion of Haitian studies in the U.S. and Haiti. Located at the FHI's new headquarters at the Smith Warehouse, the Haiti Lab takes its inspiration from the collaborative and discovery-driven model of research laboratories. Undergraduate and graduate students work with specialists in Haitian culture, history, and language on projects featuring vertical integration of Duke University expertise across disciplines and schools. The Haiti Lab is also a resource for media outlets seeking to gain knowledge of Haiti.

Haiti La‪b‬ Duke University

    • Gesellschaft und Kultur

The Haiti Lab is the first humanities laboratory at the Franklin Humanities Institute. The lab merges research, education, and practical applications of innovative thinking for Haiti's disaster recovery and for the expansion of Haitian studies in the U.S. and Haiti. Located at the FHI's new headquarters at the Smith Warehouse, the Haiti Lab takes its inspiration from the collaborative and discovery-driven model of research laboratories. Undergraduate and graduate students work with specialists in Haitian culture, history, and language on projects featuring vertical integration of Duke University expertise across disciplines and schools. The Haiti Lab is also a resource for media outlets seeking to gain knowledge of Haiti.

    • video
    Humanitarianism in Haiti: Building Capacity

    Humanitarianism in Haiti: Building Capacity

    Humanitarianism in Haiti: Visions and Practice seeks to bring together grassroots activists and donors, international NGO workers and theorists to critically assess both the aims of humanitarian and development aid and the efficacy of aid design and delivery. By creating a horizontal space to cut through the sometimes competing agendas of different actors, the conference hopes to foster more honest and practical dialogue. Through these conversations we anticipate capturing a more comprehensive picture of the politics and on-the-ground challenges shaping the reconstruction effort in Haiti, and lay the groundwork for action that more effectively addresses Haitian-defined priorities. Hosted by the Duke Haiti Lab, this conference is an outgrowth of the Haiti Project, a joint Duke-North Carolina Central University class on aid in Haiti. We are grateful to the Bank of America Foundation for its generous support along with the Mellon Foundation.

    • 2 Std 28 Min.
    • video
    Humanitarianism in Haiti: Public Health

    Humanitarianism in Haiti: Public Health

    Humanitarianism in Haiti: Visions and Practice seeks to bring together grassroots activists and donors, international NGO workers and theorists to critically assess both the aims of humanitarian and development aid and the efficacy of aid design and delivery. By creating a horizontal space to cut through the sometimes competing agendas of different actors, the conference hopes to foster more honest and practical dialogue. Through these conversations we anticipate capturing a more comprehensive picture of the politics and on-the-ground challenges shaping the reconstruction effort in Haiti, and lay the groundwork for action that more effectively addresses Haitian-defined priorities. Hosted by the Duke Haiti Lab, this conference is an outgrowth of the Haiti Project, a joint Duke-North Carolina Central University class on aid in Haiti. We are grateful to the Bank of America Foundation for its generous support along with the Mellon Foundation.

    • 2 Std 13 Min.
    • video
    Humanitarianism in Haiti: Donor Politics

    Humanitarianism in Haiti: Donor Politics

    Humanitarianism in Haiti: Visions and Practice seeks to bring together grassroots activists and donors, international NGO workers and theorists to critically assess both the aims of humanitarian and development aid and the efficacy of aid design and delivery. By creating a horizontal space to cut through the sometimes competing agendas of different actors, the conference hopes to foster more honest and practical dialogue. Through these conversations we anticipate capturing a more comprehensive picture of the politics and on-the-ground challenges shaping the reconstruction effort in Haiti, and lay the groundwork for action that more effectively addresses Haitian-defined priorities. Hosted by the Duke Haiti Lab, this conference is an outgrowth of the Haiti Project, a joint Duke-North Carolina Central University class on aid in Haiti. We are grateful to the Bank of America Foundation for its generous support along with the Mellon Foundation.

    • video
    Anthropology and Caribbean History: A Conversation with Sidney Mintz

    Anthropology and Caribbean History: A Conversation with Sidney Mintz

    Sidney Mintz, whose work in Anthropology and History transformed both fields, and has profoundly shaped Caribbean Studies, will reflect here on his intellectual trajectory, his life and fieldwork, and the future of the disciplines.

    Other participants in this conversation include Eric Mintz (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), Laurent Dubois (Romance Studies and History; Haiti Lab), and Deborah Jenson (Romance Studies; Haiti Lab).

    • 1 Std. 7 Min.
    • video
    Can Tourism Help Haiti?

    Can Tourism Help Haiti?

    Ever thought of going to Haiti just for fun? Just to enjoy it's beauty, culture and food?
    With all the press focusing on disasters and poverty in Haiti, this might seem outlandish. Paul Clammer doesn't think so, though. He is the author of the 2013 Brandt Travel Guide to Haiti, the first tourist guide to Haiti to come out in decades. Clammer is suggesting that people reconsider how they think about Haiti and consider new narratives in which Haiti is a source of fun, education, and wonder.

    • 1 Std. 21 Min.
    • video
    Haitian Creole: From margins to center

    Haitian Creole: From margins to center

    In Haiti, the failure of the school system is due to, among many other factors, the fact that the language of instruction is
    mostly French even though most Haitians, including most teachers, are fluent in Creole only. In this talk, we will mine history
    and linguistics for lessons that may help improve education for all in Haiti. In so doing, we will examine how attitudes
    toward Haitian Creole have been shaped by, and have shaped, a history of power struggles. For example, we will ask these
    two “big” questions: (i) What do past and present scientific theories about the languages spoken in Haiti, and in the Caribbean
    more generally, reveal about the making of race- and class-related hierarchies of power, hierarchies that marginalize
    people who speak Creole only? (ii) What is the relationship between the history of these linguistic theories and the socioeconomic
    and political trajectories of people of color, not only in the Caribbean, but throughout the Americas and beyond?
    As we look into these questions, we will take Haitian Creole in Haiti to represent a case study from the “margins” with
    significant lessons for the “center.”

    • 36 Min.

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