19 Folgen

The incredible journey of the world’s most influential swamp and those who call it home. Beginning at the end of the last ice age and trekking all the way through to the modern era, together we step through the centuries and meet some of the cast of characters who fashioned and forged a boggy marshland into a vibrant mercantile society and then further into a sea-trotting global super-power before becoming the centre for modern day liberalism.

History of the Netherlands Republic of Amsterdam Radio

    • Geschichte

The incredible journey of the world’s most influential swamp and those who call it home. Beginning at the end of the last ice age and trekking all the way through to the modern era, together we step through the centuries and meet some of the cast of characters who fashioned and forged a boggy marshland into a vibrant mercantile society and then further into a sea-trotting global super-power before becoming the centre for modern day liberalism.

    18 - To Boldly Go For Brabant

    18 - To Boldly Go For Brabant

    Philip the Bold and his wife Margaret ruled Flanders for twenty years from 1384-1404 and during that time would expand their family’s rule into Limburg, as well as set their successors up to rule Brabant, Holland, zeeland, Hainault and other low country territories as well. The manner in which Philip, trod this treacherous path, in particular his giving of lavish gifts and making steady and long term alliances, would set the tone for a dynasty that was going to contribute so much to the emergence of a lowland culture and identity.
    With thanks to Cory ter Smitte, Benjamin Forsyth, Bengt-Åke Andersson, Anonymous, Larry Tanz, Smutticus, Mees Dekker, Kyle Buis, Daniel Ruff and Hanneke van den Boom for becoming Patreon subscribers.
    SHOW NOTES: https://www.republicofamsterdamradio.com/episodes/historyofthenetherlands/episode-18-to-boldly-go-for-brabant
    PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/historyofthenetherlands
    TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/historyofNL
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    • 52 Min.
    Interview: Hiding in the Wolf's Lair

    Interview: Hiding in the Wolf's Lair

    For the last 12 months we have been working on an artwork for Amsterdam Light Festival #8. The theme this year is 'Disrupt', so our piece is based on what we believe to be the most disruptive event in Amsterdam's history, the Second World War. During the occupation, around 250-300 people hid in Amsterdam Artis Zoo to escape from Nazi persecution. Among them were Jews, resistance fighters, young men who didn't want to get sent to forced labour camps in Germany, and even entire families. Since audio is a terrible medium to explain a light art installation, in this episode we dive into the story of Amsterdam's zoo during the Second World War and the people who managed to survive by hiding there. To guide us through this story, we interviewed the former director of Artis, Maarten Frankenhuis, who wrote Overleven in de Dierentuin (Surviving in the Zoo), the definitive account of Artis zoo during the war.
    Show notes: https://www.republicofamsterdamradio.com/episodes/historyofthenetherlands/hiding-in-the-wolfs-lair
    Hiding in the Wolf's Lair is a joint work between Republic of Amsterdam Radio and Nomad Tinker House. www.nomadtinkerhouse.com
    With many thanks to Maarten Frankenhuis. www.maartenfrankenhuis.nl
    Check out our artwork https://amsterdamlightfestival.com/en/artworks/hiding-in-the-wolfs-lair
    Go on a tour of Amsterdam Light Festival with Those Dam Boat Guys: https://www.thosedamboatguys.com/amsterdam-light-festival
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    • 56 Min.
    17 - The Bold and the Looter's Rule

    17 - The Bold and the Looter's Rule

    Philip the Bold, Duke of Burgundy, kicked off a dynasty that would forever change the Low Countries. After his marriage to Margaret of Flanders in 1369, Philip would prove himself to be a formidable opponent to anyone playing the game of politics and power in western Europe. He generally did this by using diplomacy instead of the sword. Despite his adventurous and super trendy epithet suggesting otherwise, he was more willing to boldly give lavish gifts of wine and expensive ornaments, in order to charm the pants off anyone he was trying to manipulate, than to raise an army and go marching boldly forth. By showing magnanimity in victory after quelling an uprising in Ghent in the 1380s, by the end of the 14th century Philip the Bold was able to bring a modicum of stability to rebellious Flanders and begin the process of centralising power in the low countries under a single ruler: himself and his successors, the Dukes of Burgundy. Philip would create what would go down in history as the Burgundian Netherlands.
    With thanks to Samuel Dalcin da Anunciação, Carol Agle, Nicholas Tishler and Jeremy Heeringa and Harry Berkowitz and his class for becoming Patreon subscribers.
    SHOW NOTES: https://www.republicofamsterdamradio.com/episodes/historyofthenetherlands/episode-17-the-bold-and-the-looters-rule
    PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/historyofthenetherlands
    TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/historyofNL
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    • 48 Min.
    16 - The Fishy Tale of Willem Beukelszoon

    16 - The Fishy Tale of Willem Beukelszoon

    In the latter half of the 14th century, a series of technological developments as well as ripe social and economic conditions saw the foundations being laid for the future Dutch takeover of the northern European herring industry. Up until then, the herring trade had been dominated by the Danes, Swedes and the Hanseatic towns of northern Germany and the Baltic Sea, with Dutch and other European consumers happily importing salted herring from those places. Within two hundred years this situation would be completely reversed; the fishing and exporting of salted herring would be one of the cornerstones of the Dutch economy and Dutch cured herring would come to reach dinner tables all across Europe. This remarkable reversal of fortunes was so integral to the emergence of Dutch national identity, that it required its own position within the narrative of the emerging Dutch state. From the 17th century onwards a myth was perpetuated which credited it all to a man called Willem Beukelszoon of Biervliet. He was a humble herring fisherman who, at some point in the 14th century apparently discovered the process of gibbing, which made this whole turn around possible. Although this legend has been debunked by modern historians, its perpetuation demonstrates the importance which the so-called “royal herring” enjoyed in the creation of a Dutch national identity. So in this episode of the History of the Netherlands, we are once again going to depart from the power games of the nobility, and the wranglings of urban elite and worker’s guilds, and focus on something even more slippery, the herring.
    With thanks to Nynke van Gent, Randy Gout, Marko de Weerdt and Jeroen Peeters-Panman for becoming Patreon subscribers.
    SHOW NOTES: https://www.republicofamsterdamradio.com/episodes/historyofthenetherlands/episode-16-the-fishy-tale-of-willem-beukelszoon
    PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/historyofthenetherlands
    TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/historyofNL
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    • 47 Min.
    15 - Fuelling the Flames of Frisian Freedom

    15 - Fuelling the Flames of Frisian Freedom

    Friesland was an autonomous anomaly in Europe, free from the feudal obligations that had so deeply entrenched themselves in society everywhere else. For years the Frisians just rocked along, doing their own thing, which generally involved something to do with cows. We have largely avoided talking about them for a few episodes, but now is the time in our journey through the History of the Netherlands to look at exactly what the Frisians were doing in the 1300s that was not cow related. Put simply, for the first forty-four years of the fourteenth century forces and factions fought and feuded in Friesland, fueling the flames of fearless Frisian freedom fighters. In 1345, Frisian farmers and fishermen on the eastern side of the Zuiderzee would meet and defeat the Count of Holland in battle at Stavoren, an event that would unite people in East-Friesland and ensure that the autonomy they enjoyed known as “Friese Vrijheid”, Frisian freedom, would continue for another 150 years.
    With thanks to James Lovett, Clay Batley and Jan Kouwenberg for becoming Patreon subscribers.
    SHOW NOTES: https://www.republicofamsterdamradio.com/historyofthenetherlands/episode-15-fuelling-the-flames-of-frisian-freedom
    PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/historyofthenetherlands
    TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/historyofNL
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    • 47 Min.
    14 - The Joys of Succession in Brabant

    14 - The Joys of Succession in Brabant

    By the mid-1300s the fractured mini-states of the lowlands were being pulled apart by competing political and economic interests, warfare, dynastic struggles and the Black Death. The resulting instability meant that relations between the rulers and the ruled were constantly tested as the various layers of society tried to protect their interests in such perilous times. Whereas in Flanders this had led to bloody conflict between the Count and the cities, in other parts of the lowlands different methods were used to determine what this relationship should be. At a magnificent ceremony in Brabant in 1356, a new Duchess and Duke signed a document that did exactly this, confirming certain rights of their subjects, including the right to disobey the ruler if they failed to uphold their end of the bargain. Although this so-called ‘Joyous Entry’ would be ignored almost from the moment of its signing, it would continue to have symbolic significance throughout the History of the Netherlands. 
    With special thanks to our new Patreon subscribers: Nicholas Birns, Sairam Manda, Steven Straatemans, Joe Watts and Julian's dad Michael Smith!
    SHOW NOTES:
    https://www.republicofamsterdamradio.com/episodes/historyofthenetherlands/episode-14-the-joys-of-succession-in-brabant
    PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/historyofthenetherlands
    TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/historyofNL
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    • 41 Min.

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