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The Institute for Security, Technology, and Society (ISTS) at Dartmouth College is dedicated to pursuing research and education to advance information security and privacy throughout society.

ISTS engages in interdisciplinary research, education and outreach programs that focus on information technology (IT) and its role in society, particularly the impact of IT in security and privacy broadly conceived. ISTS nurtures leaders and scholars, educates students and the community, and collaborates with its partners to develop and deploy IT, and to better understand how IT relates to socio-economic forces, cultural values and political influences.

ISTS: Institute for Security, Technology, and Society Dartmouth

    • Technologie

The Institute for Security, Technology, and Society (ISTS) at Dartmouth College is dedicated to pursuing research and education to advance information security and privacy throughout society.

ISTS engages in interdisciplinary research, education and outreach programs that focus on information technology (IT) and its role in society, particularly the impact of IT in security and privacy broadly conceived. ISTS nurtures leaders and scholars, educates students and the community, and collaborates with its partners to develop and deploy IT, and to better understand how IT relates to socio-economic forces, cultural values and political influences.

    • video
    Edward Felten_ Technical Tradeoffs in the NSA's Mass Phone Call Data Program

    Edward Felten_ Technical Tradeoffs in the NSA's Mass Phone Call Data Program

    Edward Felten presents the first talk in the speaker series "Surveillance in the Age of Big Data", co-sponsored by ISTS and the Computer Science Colloquium.

    The National Security Agency is collecting data about a substantial fraction of all domestic phone calls. This talk will examine several technical tradeoffs surrounding the phone data program. How effective is such a program likely to be in identifying potential terrorists or clearing up false suspicion? How easily can enemies evade the program? Can the program be redesigned to better protect privacy, without losing effectiveness? In general, can intelligence agencies carry out their analysis and data processes in a way that better protects the privacy of innocent people?

    Edward Felten is Director of Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP), a cross-disciplinary effort studying digital technologies in public life. CITP has seventeen affiliated faculty members and maintains a diverse research program and a busy events schedule. Dr. Felten's research interests include computer security and privacy, and public policy issues relating to information technology. Specific topics include software security, Internet security, electronic voting, cybersecurity policy, technology for government transparency, network neutrality and Internet policy.

    • 1 Std. 15 Min.
    • video
    Extending Our Understanding of Human Behavior Through Continuous Sensing

    Extending Our Understanding of Human Behavior Through Continuous Sensing

    Extending Our Understanding of Human Behavior Through Continuous Sensing
    Wednesday, October 23, 2013 at 4:15pm
    Location: 006 Steele
    Deepak Ganesan
    Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
    Co-sponsored by ISTS and the Computer Science Colloquium
    Abstract

    Deepak Ganesan
    Our ability to continuously monitor activities, health, and lifestyles of individuals using sensors has reached unprecedented levels --- on-body sensors enable continuous sensing of our physiological signals, smartphones have a plethora of sensors to monitor activity and location, and a growing number of sensors embedded in the physical world enable monitoring of our living spaces. Such ubiquitous sensing promises to revolutionize our understanding of the social, environmental, and behavioral determinants of a wide range of human activities and health conditions.
    Despite its promise, there are fundamental challenges in designing such systems in terms of data processing, sensing, and power. How can we make reliable inferences despite the noisy, uncertain nature of natural environments? How can we expand our understanding of human behavior through more sensors that fully capture our actions, attention, and environmental cues? How can we cope with the burden of having to re-charge a growing ecosystem of wearable sensors?
    My talk discusses our ongoing work to address these challenges. From a data perspective, I will talk about leveraging machine learning techniques to detect use of addictive drugs with wearable ECG sensors, and methods to fuse information across diverse continuous sensor sources. From a sensing perspective, I will talk about the design of computational eyeglasses, a wearable sensor that continuously tracks eye and visual context. From a power perspective, I will discuss our work on RF-powered sensor devices that can sense, process and communicate at orders of magnitude less power than a typical battery-powered sensor.

    Bio
    Deepak Ganesan is currently Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science at UMASS Amherst. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from UCLA in 2004 and his bachelors in Computer Science from IIT, Madras in 1998. He received the NSF CAREER Award in 2006, the IBM Faculty Award in 2008, and a UMass Lilly Teaching Fellowship in 2009. His publications have received awards at various conferences, most recently, a Best Paper Award at ACM CHI 2013, and an Honorable Mention for Best Paper Award at ACM Ubicomp 2013. He was a Program co-chair for ACM SenSys 2010 and IEEE SECON 2013.

    • 1 Std.
    • video
    SITH3 - Panel 4: Challenges in Securing mHealth Infrastructure

    SITH3 - Panel 4: Challenges in Securing mHealth Infrastructure

    Securing IT in Healthcare: Part III
    May 17, 2013
    Panel 4: Challenges in Securing mHealth Infrastructure

    Panel Abstract
    When developing mobile health technology, who is the adversary? What are the most important concerns in developing mHealth technology that can be trusted by healthy individuals, patients, family members, clinical staff, employers, researchers, and payers? In this panel we heard from those who design and build mHealth technology as well as those with experience deploying current technology, to better understand the real risks and threats to security and privacy.

    Panelists and Presentations
    Chaired by Andrés Molina-Markham, Dartmouth College, Department of Computer Science
    Jacob Sorber, Clemson University
    Jaeyeon Jung, Microsoft Research
    Yih-Chun Hu, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    On May 16-17, 2013, ISTS hosted the third Securing Information Technology in Healthcare (SITH3) workshop in collaboration with members of the Trustworthy Information Systems for Healthcare (TISH) project team. This workshop's focus was on the exciting and ever transforming field of mHealth -- the application of mobile computing technologies to health and wellness. The SITH Workshops traditionally bring together experts from many disciplines to discuss information technology in healthcare.

    • 1 Std. 24 Min.
    • video
    SITH3 - Panel 3: Opportunities for mHealth in the Developing World

    SITH3 - Panel 3: Opportunities for mHealth in the Developing World

    Securing IT in Healthcare: Part III
    May 17, 2013
    Panel 3: Opportunities for mHealth in the Developing World

    Panel Abstract
    Mobile technology provides tremendous opportunities to make health and wellness more accessible to billions of people in developing countries. In this panel we heard from a mix of technology developers, health practitioners, and public-health officials who are pioneers in this space. We discussed technical and infrastructural challenges, sustainable business models, differing privacy laws and cultural norms, and sought to identify open research problems that need to be addressed.

    Panelists and Presentations
    Chaired by David Kotz, Champion International Professor of Computer Science, Dartmouth
    Hamish Fraser, Partners in Health Director of Informatics and Telemedicine; OpenMRS
    David Aylward, Ashoka
    Lakshminarayanan Subramanian, New York University
    Ashutosh Sabharwal, Rice University

    On May 16-17, 2013, ISTS hosted the third Securing Information Technology in Healthcare (SITH3) workshop in collaboration with members of the Trustworthy Information Systems for Healthcare (TISH) project team. This workshop's focus was on the exciting and ever transforming field of mHealth -- the application of mobile computing technologies to health and wellness. The SITH Workshops traditionally bring together experts from many disciplines to discuss information technology in healthcare.

    • 1 Std. 27 Min.
    • video
    SITH3 - Panel 2: Evolving Business Models in mHealth

    SITH3 - Panel 2: Evolving Business Models in mHealth

    Securing IT in Healthcare: Part III
    May 17, 2013
    Panel 2: Evolving Business Models in mHealth

    Panel Abstract
    How are device manufacturers, new service providers, and existing EHR players building business models for mHealth? What are the opportunities for home or long-term care, including remote service from hospitals (e.g., for chronic care or surgery recovery)? What is the role/opportunity for mainstream EHR players and how will data collected from a wide-range of mobile devices be integrated into the patient record?

    Panelists and Presentations
    Chaired by Eric Johnson, Benjamin Ames Kimball Professor of the Science of Administration and Director, Glassmeyer/McNamee Center for Digital Strategies
    Paul Gorup, Chief Innovation Officer, Cerner
    Joseph Ternullo, Center for Connected Health at Partners HealthCare
    Cameron McKennitt, President and COO of PolyRemedy
    Chuck Parker, Executive Director, Continua Health Alliance

    On May 16-17, 2013, ISTS hosted the third Securing Information Technology in Healthcare (SITH3) workshop in collaboration with members of the Trustworthy Information Systems for Healthcare (TISH) project team. This workshop's focus was on the exciting and ever transforming field of mHealth -- the application of mobile computing technologies to health and wellness. The SITH Workshops traditionally bring together experts from many disciplines to discuss information technology in healthcare.

    • 1 Std. 25 Min.
    • video
    SITH3 - Keynote Wendy Nilsen

    SITH3 - Keynote Wendy Nilsen

    Securing IT in Healthcare: Part III

    Wendy Nilsen, Ph.D. is a Health Scientist Administrator at the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR). Wendy's scientific focus is on the science of human behavior and behavior change, including: utilizing mobile technology to better understand and improve health, adherence, the mechanisms of behavior change and behavioral interventions in complex patients in primary care. More specifically, her efforts in mobile and wireless health (mHealth) research include: leading the development of the NIH mHealth Public-Private Partnership, convening meetings to address methodology and barriers to the utilization of mobile technology in research; serving on numerous federal mHealth initiatives; and, leading the mHealth training institutes. Wendy is also the chair of the Adherence Network, a trans-NIH effort to enhance and develop the science of adherence. She is also a member of the Science of Behavior Change, Health Economics and HMO Collaboratory working groups. These projects are initiatives funded through the Common Fund that target behavioral and social sciences research to improve health across a wide range of domains. Wendy also chairs the NIH Integrating Health Strategies workgroup that supports the science of behavioral treatments for 'complex patients' in primary care.

    • 53 Min.

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