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A casual stroll into the unwieldy world of International Law, struggling to keep up with whims of global politics and international relations.

Jus Cogens : The International Law Podcas‪t‬ Jus Cogens Podcast

    • Politik

A casual stroll into the unwieldy world of International Law, struggling to keep up with whims of global politics and international relations.

    Jus Cogens International Law Updates #2 - 7 December 2020

    Jus Cogens International Law Updates #2 - 7 December 2020

    News Item #1 On 11th December, the International Court of Justice, will deliver its Judgment in the case concerning Immunities and Criminal Proceedings (Equatorial Guinea v. France). The case concerns the request of the Republic of Equatorial Guinea for the ICJ to hold that the French Republic, by entering a building used as the diplomatic mission of the Republic of Equatorial Guinea in Paris, by searching, attaching and confiscating the said building, its furnishings and other property, has acted in violation of its obligations under the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations.   News Item #2 An expert panel of international and environmental lawyers has been assembled to work on a legal definition of the “international crime of ecocide, similar to definitions of the international crimes of genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity.” The panel, co-chaired by Professor Philippe Sands and Judge Florence Mumba was set up by the Stop Ecocide Foundation at the request of Swedish parliamentarians.   News Item #3 Trial Chamber IX of the International Criminal Court (ICC) has postponed the delivery of the judgment in The Prosecutor v. Dominic Ongwen to 4 February 2021. The trial in this case opened on 6 December 2016. Dominic Ongwen is accused of 70 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity allegedly committed in northern Uganda.   News Item #4 The Grand chamber of the European Court of Human Rights has made a judgement in the case of Guðmundur Andri Ástráðsson v. Iceland.  The case concerned the applicant’s allegation that the new Icelandic Court of Appeal (Landsréttur) which had upheld his conviction for road traffic offences was not “a tribunal established by law”, on account of irregularities in the appointment of one of the judges who heard his case. The Court held that there had been a violation of the right to a tribunal established by law.  News Item #5 The American Society of International Law is now accepting applications for the Francis Lieber Prize which is awarded to the authors of publications that are considered outstanding in the field of law and armed conflict. The deadline for the application, including a letter or message of nomination, must be received by 10 January 2021.

    • 2 Min.
    Jus Cogens International Law Updates #1 - 23 November 2020

    Jus Cogens International Law Updates #1 - 23 November 2020

    News Item #1

    New Zealand has become the first state to ratify an amendment to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court. The Amendment to Article 8 makes intentionally using starvation of civilians as a method of warfare in non-international armed conflicts a war crime.

    News Item #2

    24th October marked a historic occasion in the fight against the banning of nuclear weapons. The Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) has finally reached the threshold for entering into force. With the latest entry of Honduras, 50 States have now ratified the Treaty, meaning that it will enter into force as legally binding instrument of international law in 90 days.

    News Item #3

    On 12th October, The General Assembly and the Security Council of United Nations elected five Members of the International Court of Justice for a term of office of nine years, starting from 2021. Judges Xue Hanqin (China), Peter Tomka (Slovakia), Julia Sebutinde (Uganda) and Yuji Iwasawa (Japan) were re-elected as Members of the Court. Whereas, Georg Nolte (Germany) was also elected as a new Member of the Court.

    News Item #4

    The International Nuremberg Principles Academy has formally announced the start of its Nuremberg Academy Lectures . Professor Philippe Sands will deliver the inaugural lecture on 24 November 2020. In his lecture titled, ‘International Justice and Personal Stories: From East West Street to The Ratline, and Beyond’, Professor Sands will discuss the origins of international criminal law in light of the 75th anniversary of the opening of the International Military Tribunal in Nuremberg and address contemporary developments of international criminal law.

    News Item #5

    The Sixth Annual T.M.C. Asser Lecture will be held online for the first time on 26th November. Prof. Andrew Murray, a leading thinker on information technology and regulation, will discuss the challenges that artificial intelligence and big data pose for human agency and the rule of law.

    • 2 Min.
    Jus Cogens Episode 18: A Guide to the ICJ Judicial Fellowship Program - Part II

    Jus Cogens Episode 18: A Guide to the ICJ Judicial Fellowship Program - Part II

    In this episode, we talk to Mohit Khubchandani, Kritika Sharma and Claire O'Connell about the International Court of Justice's Judicial Fellowship Program. They talk to us about their experiences with applying, and about their time at the Court.

    • 55 Min.
    Jus Cogens Episode 17: A Guide to ICJ Judicial Fellowship Program - Part 1

    Jus Cogens Episode 17: A Guide to ICJ Judicial Fellowship Program - Part 1

    In our 17th episode, we talk to 4 young, dynamic individuals and former fellows at the International Court of Justice - Amir Farhadi, Beatrice Walton, Camila Mariño Venegas and Shashank P. Kumar. They chat with us about the Court's fellowship program, the application period and their experiences.

    • 1 Std. 3 Min.
    Jus Cogens Episode 16 - Reviewing ILC's Draft Convention on Crimes Against Humanity with Prof.Charles Jalloh

    Jus Cogens Episode 16 - Reviewing ILC's Draft Convention on Crimes Against Humanity with Prof.Charles Jalloh

    In this episode, Prof. Charles Jalloh joins us to deconstruct and dissect the Draft Convention on Crimes Against Humanity. The conversation is based around Prof. Jalloh's analysis in his article "The International Law Commission’s First Draft Convention on Crimes Against Humanity: Codification, Progressive Development, or Both?: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3620370

    • 51 Min.
    Jus Cogens Episode 15 - Defences & Incidental Issues in International Adjudication with Anna Ventouratou

    Jus Cogens Episode 15 - Defences & Incidental Issues in International Adjudication with Anna Ventouratou

    In this episode, Anna Ventouratou from Oxford Law joins us to discuss the ins and outs of defences and indispensable incidental issues under international adjudication.  Anna's article: https://www.ejiltalk.org/defences-and-indispensable-incidental-issues-the-limits-of-subject-matter-jurisdiction-in-view-of-the-recent-icj-icao-council-judgments/

    • 32 Min.

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