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The indoor air quality experts at EnviroKlenz discuss topics regarding indoor air quality and how to restore and maintain good indoor air quality in your home by using natural, non-toxic, and sustainable products. New topics uploaded monthly with guest hosts discussing the latest topics in indoor air quality and green living.

Let's Talk Indoor Air Quality Let's Talk Indoor Air Quality

    • Alternative Therapien

The indoor air quality experts at EnviroKlenz discuss topics regarding indoor air quality and how to restore and maintain good indoor air quality in your home by using natural, non-toxic, and sustainable products. New topics uploaded monthly with guest hosts discussing the latest topics in indoor air quality and green living.

    How to Improve Indoor Air with My Chemical Free House-Corinne Segura 10 Shocking Facts About Indoor Air & 5 ways to Improve Air Quality

    How to Improve Indoor Air with My Chemical Free House-Corinne Segura 10 Shocking Facts About Indoor Air & 5 ways to Improve Air Quality

    How to Improve Air Quality in Your Home

    Here are some mind-blowing facts about the quality of your indoor air you probably hadn’t the slightest idea about.

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the USA ranks your IAQ as one of the top five risk factors for your health. Studies that have been conducted in the past have shown that the concentration of pollutants indoors is typically about 5 times greater than those outdoors. At its worst, these pollution levels went up to 100 times higher than their outdoor counterparts.

    Your Furniture May be the Most Dangerous Culprit

    If you have furniture that you bought before the year 2006, you’re probably at risk. Back then (and even today) furniture is coated with a special fireproof paint. This sometimes contains chemicals called PBDEs, which could release toxic chemical fumes into the air in small amounts over time. Some of these are known carcinogens. Advances in technology and chemistry have not, unfortunately, led to safer chemicals being introduced to the furniture industry. For more information check out our post on how to get rid of new furniture smell

    Candles are One of the Bigger Culprits For IAQ

    Everyone loves burning a scented candle while going about their day or evening. Exercise caution when buying one, though. In addition to the wax they are made of, any scented candle contains benzene and toluene. These are both known to be cancer-causing chemicals or carcinogens. Burning a candle also releases hydrocarbons similar to the exhaust smoke of a vehicle into the air. A safe bet to maintain the air quality in your home is too shy away from scented candles and this includes those that contain essential oils for scents and artificial scents as well.

    Your Printer Could Be Killing Your Fertility

    Do you have a printer at home? For most people, the common printer type is an inkjet printer. All inkjet type printers contain chemicals that can be emitted into your indoor air, in addition, these very same chemicals and VOcs have been linked by the EPA to cause damage to the reproductive system due to long-term exposure. If you print your documents out regularly, you stand at risk of having your fertility impacted by these chemicals. One of the best things you could do to avoid this is to get yourself a laser printer or to simply get all your printing done at a store instead.

    School Isn’t as Healthy as it Seems

    Did you know that the IAQ at a school is far worse than it is in an office building? Schools are buildings designed to fit as many people into them as possible. It is a fact that there can be up to four times as many students as office workers per square unit of floor space. Children tend to breathe faster and deeper than adults. Studying in enclosed spaces for extended periods of time reduces the quality of the air so much that it is one of the main points of concern for the EPA and other government societies.

    Your Asthma Takes a Big Hit with Poor Air Quality

    Ever since asthma became an identified condition, and since the industrial revolution, people have been experiencing this respiratory condition in larger numbers every year. There is no discrimination with a disease like this. It can occur in adults and children of all nations, ethnicities, and social classes. It is, in every sense of the word, an epidemic. While it is rarely fatal, the only treatment is to reduce the onset of “attacks.” is to improve the indoor air quality in your home and reduce triggers that can lead to an asthma attack.If your home or office has poor IAQ, these attacks become way more frequent, especially in children.

    Your Grandparents Take the Brunt of it

    The elderly are among the most likely to contract one of the many serious effects of exposure to poor indoor air. This is because of the inordinate amounts of time they spend indoors when comp...

    • 13 Min.
    How To Find Non-Toxic Cleaning Products How To Find Non-Toxic Cleaning Products

    How To Find Non-Toxic Cleaning Products How To Find Non-Toxic Cleaning Products

    Let’s Talk Indoor Air Quality with Alona Shaw-Non- toxic household cleaning products

    In this episode of the “Let’s Talk Indoor Air Quality” podcast, our host Kyle speaks with Alonna Shaw from alonnashaw.com. Alonna Shaw is an artist, writer, and editor who now lives an unscented lifestyle with her husband in California. Alonna shares with our listeners a bit of her personal history and MCS experience and we then discuss the uses of different buzz words and terminology in MCS marketing, what she believes an unscented lifestyle is, and how to avoid fragrances and scents on a daily basis.

    We talk about her work as a model and how she views consumerism and advertising to the multiple chemical sensitive population, eco-friendly consumers, and the market at large. Alonna shares with Kyle some of her experiences traveling and provides some valuable MCS travel trips. This episode of the podcast wraps up with Kyle sharing some of his personal views on the various terms and language being used to market products to the MCS community and that the consumer should just ask what does that mean to me and what does that mean for this product and to look beyond just the term.



     

    Green cleaning products for the home

    Those with chemical sensitivity have learned to become crafty and resourceful when searching for safe and effective products that they can use in their home for cleaning and deodorizing but there are many consumers who are unsure fo what to look for. Consumers are becoming more educated and aware of the health risks associated with some of the toxic products and building materials that are in our homes and many have made the transition to Lifestyles of Health and Sustainability.

    If you have decided to make the switch to better health by going fragrance-free, congratulations you have joined the club of nearly 20 million people who have made this lifestyle change! The scary truth is that most consumers do not understand what their favorite fragrances are comprised of and more than 95 percent of the chemicals in synthetic fragrances are derived from petrochemicals. Some of the named chemicals in fragrances can include but are not limited to benzene derivatives, aldehydes, phthalate which are also cited on the EPA’s hazardous waste list.

    According to Scientific America “The average fragrance product tested contained 14 secret chemicals not listed on the label,” reports EWG, which analyzed the Campaign’s data. “Among them are chemicals associated with hormone disruption and allergic reactions, and many substances that have not been assessed for safety in personal care products.” EWG adds that some of the undisclosed ingredients are chemicals “with troubling hazardous properties or with a propensity to accumulate in human tissues.” Examples include diethyl phthalate, a chemical found in 97 percent of Americans and linked to sperm damage in human epidemiological studies, and musk ketone, which concentrates in human fat tissue and breast milk. EWG explains that ingredients not in a product’s “hidden fragrance mixture” must be listed on the label, so makers disclose some chemicals but “lump others together in the generic category of ‘fragrance’.”

    first reported on-http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/toxic-perfumes-and-colognes/

    What’s the difference between organic and natural?

    The answer seems pretty simple if one has experience in shopping for safe and healthy products but let’s go into these two categories and better define them. When a product states that its ingredients are natural it doesn’t necessarily mean that the product is...

    • 18 Min.
    MCS Awareness : Raising Public Awareness for Multiple Chemical Sensitivity

    MCS Awareness : Raising Public Awareness for Multiple Chemical Sensitivity

    Are You Aware of MCS?

    Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) is a condition where people experience symptoms of all kinds in response to toxic chemical exposures from everyday consumer products found in the home, office, and public environment.It is a phenomenon of the twentieth century, a result of the increase of consumer products made using toxic substances and materials.

    Symptoms range from slight to disabling. At it’s most extreme, “universal reactors” respond continuously to everything in their environment, whether toxic or benign.

    Because people with MCS react to toxic chemicals in their surrounding environment, they need understanding and cooperation from neighbors and others in their communities. They need neighbors to not use fabric softener or BBQ lighter fluid because these easily move through the neighborhood on a breeze. They need fellow parishioners to not wear perfume so they can attend church services.

    Even though MCS has been known to exist for more than 50 years, most people still are not aware of this condition, what causes it, how it can be prevented, or how they can help those who live with MCS every day.

    A Long Road to Recognition

    MCS was first reported in the mid-1950s by Dr. Theron Randolph, an allergist who practiced in Chicago. He began to identify patients with the “petrochemical problem,” who complained of becoming ill when exposed to car exhaust, smoke from factories, and various products that contain ingredients derived from gas, oil, or coal. Dr. Randolph advised these patients to avoid chemical exposures to see if their condition improved. If so, they were to reintroduce the offending substances one by one to see if the symptoms reappeared.

    At that time, the marketplace was being flooded with products made from new materials derived from petroleum and other petrochemicals that had not been used before. Brand new televisions ran DuPont’s cheery commercials proclaiming, “better living through chemistry.” In the 1960s, Rachel Carson wrote Silent Spring, the first book to expose the health and environmental effects of pesticides, while Dustin Hoffman was encouraged to go into the field of plastics in the movie “The Graduate.”

    While a growing number of patients were being diagnosed with MCS and finding relief by avoiding toxic chemicals in consumer products as best they could, the medical community now had to come to terms with a condition they had never seen before and did not know how to treat. No drug or surgery could exist to treat MCS. Government agencies had to recognize MCS as an illness before they could approve financial aid for disabled sufferers.

    The energy crisis of the 1970s also contributed to MCS. Prior to this, buildings were “leaky,” allowing air to escape through cracks and other small openings. This was good for allowing toxic fumes to escape but made it difficult for buildings to hold heating and cooling. To save energy, buildings were “tightened” by filling all holes and cracks. Suddenly indoor concentrations of toxic chemicals emitting from consumer products and building skyrocketed, creating the new field of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ). And more MCS.

    The first books about MCS weren’t written until the early 1980’s. Patient advocate Natalie Golos wrote the first book on how to live with MCS Coping With Your Allergies, and Debra Lynn Dadd wrote A Consumer Guide for the Chemically Sensitive, which identified the toxic chemicals those with MCS were reacting to, where they were found in consumer products, and how to find safe alternatives. Support groups began to form,

    • 18 Min.
    Detoxing Your Home? Which Whole House Air Purifier Work Best for your Home? Detoxing Your Home? Which Whole House Air Purifier Work Best for your Home?

    Detoxing Your Home? Which Whole House Air Purifier Work Best for your Home? Detoxing Your Home? Which Whole House Air Purifier Work Best for your Home?

    During today’s Podcast show, we will be discussing ways to improve your indoor air as we are now in the heart of allergy season.Our guest will be Dr. Jennifer Weinberg, Preventive and Lifestyle Medicine Physician, Environmental Health Expert, Author of The Whole Cure & The Simple Pure Whole Wellness Solution.

    Dr. Weinberg has followed her passion for wellness and healthy living and has developed a comprehensive approach to healing. She was trained at the University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins and her broad expertise in preventive and lifestyle medicine, environmental health, yoga, and health coaching allow her to offer innovative wellness and education programs.

    Dr. Weinberg touched upon several types of air pollutants that air purifiers need to be able to address to have a positive impact on personal environment spaces. Pollen and allergens, VOCs, cleaning chemicals, outside factors, furniture odors among others. Poor indoor air quality represents one of the top public health risks, according to the National Institute of Environmental Health Science. And since the average person spends ~ 90% of their time indoors, doing things to positively impact the air quality in your personal environments can provide significant lifestyle benefits.

    Do indoor air purifiers really work?

    In our everyday lives we are bombarded with toxins and chemicals in the water we drink and bathe in, the food we eat and the air we breathe. When the body is overwhelmed with toxins, it cannot properly perform its functions, produce appropriate levels of hormones or digest our food.

    Chemicals in common products which we use every day and in our environments are linked to rising rates of diseases including obesity, diabetes, thyroid diseases, behavioral problems, cancers and more.

    Do you or your children suffer from allergies, autoimmune issues, sinus problems, metabolic imbalances, headaches, fatigue or other health issues? Many common and debilitating health issues can be linked to the quality of the air, water, and other substances inside of our homes.

    via-http://www.jenniferweinbergmd.com/simple-steps-for-a-home-detox/

    Air purifiers and filtration systems can be an effective solution for removing a variety of pollutants from the air, but you need to research what is can do and does that match what you actually need. We are often asked how different technologies such as ionizers and carbon compare in their ability to address all these aspects of poor air quality with the EnviroKlenz Technology



    It’s Allergy & Asthma Awareness Month. Be sure to check out EPA’s Air Quality Flag program: https://t.co/HQkmEKVMOx pic.twitter.com/eXuUeDsOpH

    — EPA Indoor airPLUS (@EPAiaplus) May 2, 2016



    Ionizer Air Purifier Dangers

    Ionizer sends charged molecules into the air in your home. They interact with dust particles in the air due to an electric attraction. These ions either make the pollutants stick to walls or surfaces within the air space or capture them on an electrically-charged collection plate in the unit. So these devices can reduce some particulates, but a big drawback is they have no effect on gasses and odors, they are less effective than HEPA for particulates, and the area they can treat is often limited. Additionally, some ionizers have been known to produce ozone which may be more problematic for air quality than...

    • 18 Min.
    Reducing Your Chemical Exposure at Home 3 Detox & Natural Cleaning Tips Podcast: Reducing Your Chemical Exposure at Home

    Reducing Your Chemical Exposure at Home 3 Detox & Natural Cleaning Tips Podcast: Reducing Your Chemical Exposure at Home

    Removing Chemical Odors from Your Home’s Contents

    In this episode of “Let’s Talk Indoor Air Quality,” we are joined by Leslie Reichert, “The Cleaning Coach”, a nationally-recognized green home keeping expert dedicated to educating people on keeping their homes, schools and work areas “green”. Leslie came on to the show to discuss cleaning products and what to look for when selecting cleaning products to use in your home. The program begins with a brief look at the toxic chemical found in cleaning products and how Leslie started her journey to become the well known and respected Green Cleaning Coach.

     

     

    Toxic chemicals found in cleaning products

    PHTHALATES

    Found in: Many fragranced household products, such as air fresheners, dish soap, even toilet paper.

    Health Risks: Phthalates are known endocrine disruptors. Men with higher phthalate compounds in their blood had correspondingly reduced sperm counts, according to a 2003 study conducted by researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Harvard School of Public Health.

    2. PERCHLOROETHYLENE OR “PERC”

    Found in: Dry-cleaning solutions, spot removers, and carpet and upholstery cleaners.

    Health Risks: Perc is a neurotoxin, according to the chief scientist of environmental protection for the New York Attorney General’s office. And the EPA classifies perc as a “possible carcinogen” as well. People who live in residential buildings where dry cleaners are located have reported dizziness, loss of coordination and other symptoms.

    first reported on-https://experiencelife.com/article/8-hidden-toxins-whats-lurking-in-your-cleaning-products/

    Check out the full podcast below as Debra Lynn Dadd shares her insight on her concerns with indoor air quality and how she has seen the industry evolve over the last decade in regards towards air treatment and poor indoor air quality.

    Check out the full podcast below as the green cleaning coach shares her insight on her concerns with indoor air quality and how she has seen the industry evolve over the last decade in regards towards air treatment and poor indoor air quality.



     

    • 11 Min.
    Let’s Talk Indoor Air Quality Podcast:Chemical Exposure Events and How they Can Impact a Person’s Life Let’s Talk Indoor Air Quality Podcast:Chemical Exposure Events and How they Can Impact a Person’s Life

    Let’s Talk Indoor Air Quality Podcast:Chemical Exposure Events and How they Can Impact a Person’s Life Let’s Talk Indoor Air Quality Podcast:Chemical Exposure Events and How they Can Impact a Person’s Life

    In this podcast episode of “Let’s Talk Indoor Air Quality,” we discussed chemical exposure events and how they can impact a person’s life.  Exposures can come from or be triggered by pesticides, paints, cigarette smoke, volatile scented products, aerosols, personal health care products, carpeting, press wood products, cleaning compounds, and many other volatile chemicals.

    Our guest was Audrey Hoodkiss, from Ecology By Design in Los Angles, and her life was greatly impacted by an acute exposure to pesticides in the early 1990’s.  Audrey now helps individuals with multiple chemical sensitivity navigate their lives while she simultaneously deals with the same challenges.  She has turned her negative experience into a positive by sharing the knowledge she has gained over the years with others that are just coming to understand what MCS is and how to live a better life.  She discusses some of the details of her exposure event, and how her past career experiences and a fateful day in a furniture store lead to Ecology by Design.  Audrey discusses some of her advocacy work, what it was like before people knew much about MCS, how she lives a heathier lifestyle, and she shares some advice and resources for individuals living with MCS.  She shares what she has learned on air purifiers and what to look for when addressing air quality concerns.

    • 30 Min.

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