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Inspired by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the lectures highlight the University’s acclaimed medical research.

Conan Doyle drew inspiration for his character Sherlock Holmes when he was a medical student at Edinburgh.

He based Holmes on the Professor of Medicine Joseph Bell, who was known for his meticulous attention to detail.

Today’s medical sleuths, just like Holmes, must use powers of observation and deduction not only to make the right diagnosis but also to find new treatments.

Medical Detectives The University of Edinburgh

    • Medizin

Inspired by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the lectures highlight the University’s acclaimed medical research.

Conan Doyle drew inspiration for his character Sherlock Holmes when he was a medical student at Edinburgh.

He based Holmes on the Professor of Medicine Joseph Bell, who was known for his meticulous attention to detail.

Today’s medical sleuths, just like Holmes, must use powers of observation and deduction not only to make the right diagnosis but also to find new treatments.

    • video
    Prof. Peter Sandercock - Unravelling the Mystery of Stroke Disease - The Clue's in the Numbers...

    Prof. Peter Sandercock - Unravelling the Mystery of Stroke Disease - The Clue's in the Numbers...

    Professor Peter Sandercock, Personal Chair in Medical Neurology, presents the fourth lecture in the 2014 Medical Detectives series entitled, Unravelling the Mystery of Stroke Disease - The Clue's in the Numbers...

    Ideas about the causes of stroke have evolved over the centuries from the mystical to the realisation that most strokes are due to a plumbing problem - a blocked or burst artery in the brain.

    In this lecture Professor Peter Sandercock will begin by describing early attempts to map stroke in the population and then explain how the numerical science of epidemics of infectious diseases in populations was successfully applied to stroke to identify its main causes.

    Recorded on 6 November 2014 at the University of Edinburgh's Anatomy Lecture Theatre.

    • 56 Min.
    • video
    Prof. Aziz Sheikh - The Sign of Three: An Investigation into the Epidemic of Itch, Sneeze and Wheeze

    Prof. Aziz Sheikh - The Sign of Three: An Investigation into the Epidemic of Itch, Sneeze and Wheeze

    Professor Aziz Sheikh, Professor of Primary Care Research & Development and Co-Director of the University's Centre for Population Health Scientist, delivers the third lecture in the 2014 Medical Detectives series entitled, "The Sign of Three: Progress Report on an Investigation into the Epidemic of Itch, Sneeze and Wheeze".

    In this lecture, Professor Sheikh will present a summary of the main culprits identified to-date and share his thoughts on where the investigation should now focus attention.

    Recorded on 23 October 2014, at the University of Edinburgh's Anatomy Lecture Theatre.

    • 51 Min.
    • video
    Dr Richard Chin - Unlocking the Mysteries of Childhood Epilepsy

    Dr Richard Chin - Unlocking the Mysteries of Childhood Epilepsy

    Dr Richard Chin, Clinical Senior Lecturer and Director of the Muir Maxwell Epilepsy Centre (MMEC) at the University of Edinburgh, delivers the second lecture in the 2014 Medical Detectives series, entitled "Unlocking the Mysteries of Childhood Epilepsy".

    This talk addresses some of the major challenges in childhood epilepsy: identifying the cause, finding better treatments, and dealing with the learning and behavioural problems in epilepsy.

    http://www.ed.ac.uk/news/events/medical-detectives/2014/chin

    Recorded on 9 October 2014 at the University of Edinburgh's Anatomy Lecture Theatre.

    • 57 Min.
    • video
    Dr Jeffrey Schoenebeck - Doggedly Dependent: A Canine Story of Human Intervention and Form

    Dr Jeffrey Schoenebeck - Doggedly Dependent: A Canine Story of Human Intervention and Form

    Dr Jeffrey Schoenebeck, Career Track Fellow at the University of Edinburgh, delivers the first lecture in the 2014 Medical Detectives series, entitled "Doggedly Dependent: A Canine Story of Human Intervention and Form".

    No other terrestrial species of animal is as diverse in its morphology as man's best friend, the dog.

    Today more than four hundred breeds of dogs are recognized worldwide. Why and how did dogs evolve so rapidly and broadly?

    Dr Schoenebeck discusses the scientific advances that occurred in the last decade that have enabled researchers to begin unravelling the mysteries of canine diversity.

    http://www.ed.ac.uk/news/events/medical-detectives/2014/schoenebeck

    Recorded on 25 September 2014 at the University of Edinburgh's Anatomy Lecture Theatre.

    • 57 Min.
    • video
    Prof. Charles ffrench-Constant - Why Doesn't the Brain Repair Itself?

    Prof. Charles ffrench-Constant - Why Doesn't the Brain Repair Itself?

    Professor Charles ffrench-Constant, Professor of Multiple Sclerosis Research, presents the Medical Detectives lecture, "Why Doesn't the Brain Repair Itself?".

    The patient disabled by spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis illustrates the consequences of the failure of repair in the brain after injury. But why does this fail? Other tissues such as skin repair very well, so what factors make the brain different?

    This talk examines the clues that experiments have given us as to the identity of the culprits. How is current research trying to deal with them, and why might it be that they turned to crime in the first place?

    Recorded on 7 November 2013 at the University of Edinburgh's Anatomy Lecture Theatre.

    • 1 Std. 2 Min.
    • video
    Prof. Stephen Lawrie - Scanning for a Diagnostic Test for Schizophrenia

    Prof. Stephen Lawrie - Scanning for a Diagnostic Test for Schizophrenia

    Professor Stephen Lawrie, Professor of Psychiatry and Head of the Division of Psychiatry at the University of Edinburgh, delivers his Medical Detectives lecture entitled "Scanning for a Diagnostic Test for Schizophrenia".

    Brain imaging can be used to distinguish patients with schizophrenia from their relatives, and from other patients with major psychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorder and autism.

    This talk takes a journey through these investigations, lay out the evidence and show how outcomes may be enhanced and possibly even prevent psychosis in high risk populations.

    Recorded on 24 October 2013 at The University of Edinburgh's Anatomy Lecture Theatre.

    • 53 Min.

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