26 Folgen

Interviews with kickass Indigenous women doing things differently! I invite you to look at the world through a different lens, a personal lens, a cultural lens, a lens made by and made for us – mā hine, mō hine, kia hine!

NUKU Qiane Matata-Sipu

    • Gesellschaft und Kultur

Interviews with kickass Indigenous women doing things differently! I invite you to look at the world through a different lens, a personal lens, a cultural lens, a lens made by and made for us – mā hine, mō hine, kia hine!

    //026 Rangimarie Pomare

    //026 Rangimarie Pomare

    Rangimarie is the tumuaki of Te Kura Kaupapa Māori o Tututarakihi in the Far North.

    At only 29 she is transforming the education system by creating a unique kura, embeded in tikanga Māori, with a goal to actively exercise Tino Rangatiratanga. Tututarakihi aligns its school term with the maramataka. The curriculum caters to the interests of its tamariki, and the taiao as a core part of the classroom.

    Language, mathematics and science are learnt through diving, fishing, entrepreneurship, farming and other practices that invite community champions to become kaiako, teaching through lived experience.

    In this episode we talk about the status of te reo Māori in Aotearoa, creating a tikanga-based Māori education system, Rangimarie’s dream to build a whare whakairo in Te Tai Tokerau and,  why she advocates for a 4 day working week for better whānau wellbeing. 

    • 46 Min.
    //025 Julia Mage'au Gray

    //025 Julia Mage'au Gray

    Julia is a dancer, mark maker, storyteller.

    Of Papua New Guinean and Australian heritage, she created the film Tep Tok : Reading Between Our Lines, sharing the journey to raise awareness for the dying art form that she is helping revive through her hand poke and hand tap method.

    She talks to us about her practice, about women’s traditional roles in mark making, and reviving the old, to new old.

    • 50 Min.
    //024 Nikau Hindin

    //024 Nikau Hindin

    This full time artist is a bark cloth maker and currently living in Turanga (Gisborne). Her Aute pieces are adorned with celestial patterns, combining ancestral knowledge of Kapa and star navigation.

    In this episode we talk about how Hawaii helped Nikau find her calling, how art school almost turned her off being an artist and, that time she ran off to be in the circus.

    • 1 Std. 1 Min.
    //023 Aqui Thami

    //023 Aqui Thami

    Aqui is a Janajāti woman from the Himalayan regions of South Asia. She travelled to Aotearoa from India earlier this year for an exhibition we both participated in at ST PAUL st Gallery. It was in the middle of the Ihumātao reclamation and so we recorded her interview in a portacom, on the whenua.
    In this episode she shares the reality of being an indigenous Indian woman, of growing up in a militarised neighbourhood, the rules around when and how people can gather, and the truths of the tea plantations in her home area of Darjeeling. She also talks to us about her brave move to open Sister Library and, how she uses art in activism and community empowerment projects.

    • 45 Min.
    //022 Pualani Case

    //022 Pualani Case

    Recently Pualani Case travelled to Aotearoa to bring us the stories of Hawaii and her fight to protect her maunga, Mauna Kea. 

    Aunty Pua, as she is affectionately known, is a spiritual and cultural leader. She is a Kumu Hula, a teacher of traditional dance and chant, and is a passionate advocate for the Kanaka Maoli indigenous people of Hawaii. 

    She holds multiple degrees, and was a public school teacher for more than 30 years, but today, she and her family work tirelessly to protect their ancestral spaces from destruction and desecration. 

    In this episode we talk about religious colonialism, indigenous solidarity, and of course, her beloved Mauna Kea. 

    #KūKia'iMauna 

    • 1 Std. 2 Min.
    //021 Dr Amber Aranui

    //021 Dr Amber Aranui

    Dr Amber Aranui (Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Tūwharetoa) has a special job. As a researcher for the Karanga Aotearoa Repatriation Programme at Te Papa Museum, she has spent the past 10 and a half years searching the world for our tūpuna, and working to bring them home. 

    The bones and body parts of some of our ancestors are in museums, universities and private collections. Old. Young. Tāne. Wāhine. 

    Amber’s mahi is to find them, learn about how they came to be there, investigate who they are, then try to reunite them with their descendants. It isn't an easy job, but it is an important one. And is one that gives her a lot of fulfilment. 

    In this episode we talk about the history of ‘scientific research’ on Māori and Moriori, Amber shares some of the emotional realities of her mahi and, she teaches us about the issues related to repatriation. 

    www.NUKUwomen.co.nz 

    • 59 Min.

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