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The Colloquium CTBTO Past and Future Contributions to Emergency Preparedness: Fukushima Case Study on 9 March 2012 discussed the use of CTBTO data to enable national authorities to issue timely tsunami warnings and assess the dispersal of radioactive emissions after a nuclear accident.

Participating organizations included the Japanese Permanent Mission to the United Nations in Vienna, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Austrian Permanent Mission to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

CTBTO Spokesperson Annika Thunborg moderated the colloquium: "This event is part of the Tim Hampton Lecture Series, in commemoration of one of our most beloved and dedicated staff members," she explained. "This is a series of informational lectures concerning various technical topics related to the CTBTO. Why name this lecture series after Tim Hampton? Let me say that Tim was always willing to enthusiastically share all the knowledge he had, with anyone and everyone. We hope that these lectures would be a clear demonstration of the enthusiasm, joy and inclusiveness

One Year after Fukushima: The CTBTO's Contribution Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization

    • Wissenschaft

The Colloquium CTBTO Past and Future Contributions to Emergency Preparedness: Fukushima Case Study on 9 March 2012 discussed the use of CTBTO data to enable national authorities to issue timely tsunami warnings and assess the dispersal of radioactive emissions after a nuclear accident.

Participating organizations included the Japanese Permanent Mission to the United Nations in Vienna, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Austrian Permanent Mission to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

CTBTO Spokesperson Annika Thunborg moderated the colloquium: "This event is part of the Tim Hampton Lecture Series, in commemoration of one of our most beloved and dedicated staff members," she explained. "This is a series of informational lectures concerning various technical topics related to the CTBTO. Why name this lecture series after Tim Hampton? Let me say that Tim was always willing to enthusiastically share all the knowledge he had, with anyone and everyone. We hope that these lectures would be a clear demonstration of the enthusiasm, joy and inclusiveness

    • video
    Introduction and Significance, Annika Thunborg, CTBTO Spokesperson and Lassina Zerbo, International Data Centre Division, CTBTO

    Introduction and Significance, Annika Thunborg, CTBTO Spokesperson and Lassina Zerbo, International Data Centre Division, CTBTO

    Annika Thunborg, Spokesperson and Chief of Public Information, CTBTO and Lassina Zerbo, Director CTBTO International Data Centre

    The CTBTO’s International Monitoring System (IMS) can contribute to the mitigation of disasters in several ways: it can provide time-critical data for disaster early warning, for measuring radioactivity in the atmosphere after nuclear accidents, and for broadening the scientific knowledge basis about such disasters. Besides providing such data, it is equally important to assure its best use through a coordinated and coherent UN response.

    • 7 Min.
    • video
    Japanese perspective, Ambassador Toshiro Ozawa, Permanent Representative of Japan to the United Nations in Vienna

    Japanese perspective, Ambassador Toshiro Ozawa, Permanent Representative of Japan to the United Nations in Vienna

    “Through the timely provision of concrete data on the concentration levels of radioactive materials and through its science-based predictions of the dispersion of the radiation plume, the CTBTO showed to the Member States that the concentration levels of the radioactive materials were far below levels that could cause harm to human health.” Japan has provided a voluntary contribution of over US$ 730,000 to further enhance the CTBTO’s capabilities to track airborne radioactivity through Atmospheric Transport Modelling (ATM).

    • 5 Min.
    • video
    IAEA perspective, Denis Flory, IAEA Deputy Director General and Head of the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security

    IAEA perspective, Denis Flory, IAEA Deputy Director General and Head of the Department of Nuclear Safety and Security

    Fukushima had “collateral benefits” for the scientific community and for all of us, because it brought us much closer together and gave us the opportunity to work closer with the CTBTO and other organizations. The CTBTO data was made available to the IAEA within the first hour of the accident, and it is now available on a permanent basis to the agency. The IAEA’s Fukushima Monitoring database contains more than 1 million data measurements from different sources.

    • 8 Min.
    • video
    UNESCO/IOC perspective, Wendy Watson-Wright, Assistant Director General of UNESCO and Executive Secretary of the IOC

    UNESCO/IOC perspective, Wendy Watson-Wright, Assistant Director General of UNESCO and Executive Secretary of the IOC

    CTBTO and IOC-UNESCO have enjoyed fruitful collaboration since 2005, which was formalized through an agreement in 2010. The seismic data from the CTBTO’s International Monitoring System is provided with very high reliability and quality, both of which are essential for accurate tsunami warnings, including for avoiding unnecessary evacuations.

    • 6 Min.
    • video
    UNSCEAR perspective, Wolfgang Weiss, UNSCEAR Chair

    UNSCEAR perspective, Wolfgang Weiss, UNSCEAR Chair

    All UN organizations have to work closely together in order to provide timely and precise information when responding to disasters such as the Fukushima accident. The CTBTO network, which proved invaluable in the first two weeks after the accident, is a unique source of data not only in crisis situations but is also of great long-term importance for scientific research: “Science can profit from your data and you can profit from science.”

    • 5 Min.
    • video
    WHO perspective, Maria Neira, Director of the Department of Health and Environment at the World Health Organization (WHO)

    WHO perspective, Maria Neira, Director of the Department of Health and Environment at the World Health Organization (WHO)

    The importance of inter-organizational and inter-sectorial collaboration is one of the most critical lessons learned from the Fukushima disaster. CTBTO data proved crucial in enabling the WHO to provide accurate information to the public on health issues after the nuclear accident: “We would like to thank CTBTO for the collaboration, openness and providing data.”

    • 9 Min.

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