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“Popcorn Talk” is a 30-minute long podcast dissecting new movies and providing a decent review that will at least help you decide if a movie is worth seeing or not. Podcasters Logan Raschke, a senior journalism major at Eastern Illinois University and Managing Editor for The Daily Eastern News, and Analicia “Anali” Haynes, a senior journalism major and senior reporter for the DEN, analyze movies and share their thoughts for movie-goers.

Popcorn Talk The Daily Eastern News

    • TV und Film

“Popcorn Talk” is a 30-minute long podcast dissecting new movies and providing a decent review that will at least help you decide if a movie is worth seeing or not. Podcasters Logan Raschke, a senior journalism major at Eastern Illinois University and Managing Editor for The Daily Eastern News, and Analicia “Anali” Haynes, a senior journalism major and senior reporter for the DEN, analyze movies and share their thoughts for movie-goers.

    Popcorn Talk: 'Pan's Labyrinth' (2006)

    Popcorn Talk: 'Pan's Labyrinth' (2006)

    Guillermo del Toro's 2006 historical and fantasy film "Pan's Labyrinth" is the epitome of quality foreign film. Del Toro combines a complex, historical conflict with fairy tales reminiscent of the fables we read as children. Who knew the grittiest and most horrific of real-life history paired with fantastical fiction could go together like peanut butter and jelly?

    What drives the success of "Pan's Labyrinth" is the complex symbolism and intertextuality that makes immersive storytelling a walk in the park. The symbolic imagery, comparing and contrasting the horrors of history to fanciful fables, drives home comparisons between different art forms that will live on forever. 

    The Summer 2020 edition of Popcorn Talk highlights older movies (pre-2010s) that have varying genres, cultures, themes and unique merits. Every movie reviewed is a gem in its own way and is totally worth checking out.

    In this episode of “Popcorn Talk,” Logan Raschke, a senior journalism major at Eastern Illinois University and Fall 2020 senior designer and podcast editor for The Daily Eastern News, reviews “Pan's Labyrinth.”

    • 19 Min.
    Popcorn Talk: 'Eraserhead' (1977)

    Popcorn Talk: 'Eraserhead' (1977)

    David Lynch's 1977 indie horror/surrealist film "Eraserhead" is one that cannot be explained, no matter how much viewers want it to make sense. It defies all explanation, and that alone is reason enough to give it a watch.

    Lynch uses unsettling imagery that targets our human senses into succumbing to fear and perplexity. We stumble over ourselves trying to make sense out of such a dark, mysterious and uncanny film that has no meaning. 

    If you're interested in body horror and surrealism in film, this one takes hold of fundamental human fears: uncertainty and unease. 

    Even though this is a film that is totally left to each viewer's interpretation, this episode of Popcorn Talk aims to analyze three central aspects of "Eraserhead": Henry Spencer, his deformed baby and the woman in the radiator. 

    The Summer 2020 edition of Popcorn Talk highlights older movies (pre-2010s) that have varying genres, cultures, themes and unique merits. Every movie reviewed is a gem in its own way and is totally worth checking out.

    In this episode of “Popcorn Talk,” Logan Raschke, a senior journalism major at Eastern Illinois University and Fall 2020 senior designer and podcast editor for The Daily Eastern News, reviews “Eraserhead.”

    • 14 Min.
    Popcorn Talk: 'Perfume: The Story of a Murderer'

    Popcorn Talk: 'Perfume: The Story of a Murderer'

    More people should know about the 2006 film "Perfume: The Story of a Murderer." 

    Directed by Tom Tom Tykwer and starring Ben Whishaw, Alan Rickman and Dustin Hoffman, this cat-and-mouse murder story centered in 18th Century France played around with the power human senses before "Birdbox" and "A Quiet Place" received national acclaim. 

    Separate from these recent titles, "Perfume" expands upon an intriguing question: What would an individual do with the ultimate sense of smell? 

    Jean-Baptiste Grenouille chooses a murderous path toward an ultimate, unprecedented goal: Preserving the scent of beauty.

    The Summer 2020 edition of Popcorn Talk highlights older movies (pre-2010s) that have varying genres, cultures, themes and unique characteristics. Every movie reviewed is a unique gem its own way and totally worth checking out.

    In this episode of “Popcorn Talk,” Logan Raschke, a senior journalism major at Eastern Illinois University and Fall 2020 senior designer for The Daily Eastern News, reviews “Perfume: The Story of a Murderer." 

    • 30 Min.
    Popcorn Talk Episode 8: (Joker)

    Popcorn Talk Episode 8: (Joker)

    Joaquin Phoenix blew viewers away with his portrayal of comic icon Joker in the 2019 film of the same name. Audiences were pretty split after the film's Oct. 4 debut because of its unusual depiction of the Joker. Instead of seeing a raving, hysterical, maniacal clown sabotage vigilante Batman, we see something much more relatable: a severely mentally ill man abandoned by family, friends and society.

    Many critics of the film argue that seeing the Joker in a more sympathetic light can be problematic because he's the "bad guy." Let's face it; he does kill innocent people. But is feeling sympathy for a morally gray character a problem? Or is it a result of good storytelling? Guest podcaster Elizabeth Taylor and Popcorn Talk co-host Logan Raschke can attest to both sides of the "Joker" film debate.

    “Popcorn Talk” is a 30-minute long podcast dissecting movies and providing a decent review that will at least help you decide if a movie is worth seeing or not.

    In this eighth episode of “Popcorn Talk,” Logan Raschke, a senior journalism major at Eastern Illinois University and Fall 2019 managing editor for The Daily Eastern News, and Elizabeth Taylor, a journalism major and staff reporter for the DEN, analyze “Joker."

    • 34 Min.
    Popcorn Talk Episode 7 (Once Upon a Time in Hollywood and It Chapter Two)

    Popcorn Talk Episode 7 (Once Upon a Time in Hollywood and It Chapter Two)

    In this episode we looked at two movies: Quentin Tarantino’s “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” and Andrés Muchietti’s “It Chapter Two.”
    In Quentin Tarantino’s tenth film, actor Rick Dalton gained fame and fortune by starring in a 1950s television Western, but is now struggling to find work that matters to him in a a changing Hollywood. He spends most of his time drinking and hanging out with Cliff Booth, his best friend and longtime stunt double. Oh, by the way, Rick lives next door to Roman Polanski and Sharon Tate. You know, the filmmaker and budding actress whose futures were changed by members of the Manson Family.
    “It Chapter Two” unites the members of the Losers’ Club after 27 years because Pennywise the evil clown has returned to terrorize the Derry, Maine.
    Now adults, the once childhood friends have gone their separate ways but when people start disappearing, Mike Hamlin calls the others for help. The group must fight their damaged past and conquer their fears to defeat Pennywise.
    “Popcorn Talk” is a 30-minute long podcast dissecting movies and providing a decent review that will at least help you decide if a movie is worth seeing or not.
    In this seventh episode of “Popcorn Talk,” Logan Raschke, a senior journalism major at Eastern Illinois University and Fall 2019 managing editor for The Daily Eastern News, and Analicia “Anali” Haynes, a senior journalism major and senior reporter for the DEN, analyze “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood” and “It Chapter Two.”

    • 37 Min.
    Popcorn Talk Episode 6 (Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark)

    Popcorn Talk Episode 6 (Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark)

    André Øvredal's film "Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark," based on the '80s and '90s short story collections, transforms the creepy tales we read and chilling artwork (from Stephen Gammell) we absorbed as children onto the movie screen.

    The question we had before we watched it was, 'How do you make a movie out of a children's book of short stories?' We were a little skeptical at first, but the imaginative collaboration of  Øvredal and Guillermo del Toro made for an incredible viewing experience. This may just be our highest ranking film on "Popcorn Talk" yet. Listen on to find out why.

    “Popcorn Talk” is a 30-minute long podcast dissecting movies both new and old and providing a decent review that will at least help you decide if a movie is worth seeing or not.

    In this sixth episode of “Popcorn Talk,” Logan Raschke, a senior journalism major at Eastern Illinois University and Fall 2019 managing editor for The Daily Eastern News, and Analicia “Anali” Haynes, a senior journalism major and senior reporter for the DEN, analyze “Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark.”

    • 31 Min.

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