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It's time to stop re-imagining things and actually changing them. Tune into Recalibrate with Samsung, where we'll discuss how technology is changing the way we work, connect, and live our lives.

Recalibrate with Samsung Network‪s‬ Samsung

    • Technologie

It's time to stop re-imagining things and actually changing them. Tune into Recalibrate with Samsung, where we'll discuss how technology is changing the way we work, connect, and live our lives.

    5G Indoor Solutions

    5G Indoor Solutions

    We all know 5G is arguably the hottest topic in wireless connectivity, and today we’re going to zoom in a bit and tackle the importance of bringing this powerful technology indoors. On this episode of Samsung Recalibrate, Colin Bowdery, Director of Small Cells and New Business for the Networks division at Samsung, discusses why bringing 5G indoors is such a big deal for this generation of wireless innovation. Moving 5G’s reach indoors will help better meet consumer expectations for performance and connectivity. 5G is a really promising level of wireless performance and brings impressive speeds and capabilities, but users are going to expect those capabilities to be present wherever they go, not just outdoors or in particular places. 5G is forcing mobile operators to rethink their network deployment strategies since a robust indoor network will be critical for enabling the new use cases and delivering the user experience that 5G promises. Samsung is leading the way with its Samsung Link portfolio. Samsung’s indoor portfolio covers a diverse mix of spectrums and environments, covering mmWave and mid- and low-band spectrums, and delivering results in places from factory and enterprise settings to campuses and more. Bowdery details the portfolio solutions that are enabling the advancement of 5G mmWave indoor solutions and paving the way towards the commercialization of private 5G networks.

    • 6 Min.
    Breaking Down vRAN and Its Role in the 5G Future

    Breaking Down vRAN and Its Role in the 5G Future

    Virtualized RAN, or vRAN, is a highly complex topic, and there’s a lot of confusion about what it means in the context of 5G. On this episode of Recalibrate, we break it all down, highlighting vRAN’s use cases, benefits, and role in our collective 5G future. vRAN is a virtualized radio access network and is seen as the next step in the evolution of cellular networks and specifically advancing 5G. Essentially, it’s taking previously hardware-driven functions and making them virtualized or software-based. Think about the transition that took place in IT networks. Like those shifts, many operators are looking to move toward a more software-based network to become more flexible in management, services and feature introduction. vRAN moves the controller functions of today’s hardware base stations to centralized servers or closer to the edge of a network, allowing Mobile Network Operators, or MNOs, to pool and adjust radio resources to better accommodate for user traffic. vRAN can effectively support low-latency and new, highly available services, works on options other than expanding fiber connections where necessary, and brings along fewer operational and maintenance headaches than you might realize. Today’s future-proof, 4G vRAN solutions are ready to deliver in the 5G world and provide the connectivity and performance users will come to expect from ever-evolving networks, and host Tyler Kern and guest Derek Johnston took this opportunity to dive into exactly how that rollout will occur.

    • 6 Min.
    How Citizens Broadband Radio Service, or CBRS, Brings More People Together

    How Citizens Broadband Radio Service, or CBRS, Brings More People Together

    Rather than a CB radio service or some sort of community service broadcasting weather forecasts, CBRS is a shared spectrum approach allowing Mobile Network Operators to reach areas where it’s not possible to utilize fiber or other forms of connectivity.
    It also solves limitations like limited 4G LTE in remote areas and a lack of predictable latency, an inability to prioritize traffic and security limitations with Wi-Fi.
    Ashish Bhatia, Senior Technical Sales Engineer at Samsung Electronics America, said new FCC rules allows for shared use of the 150 MHz spectrum in the 3.5 GHz band from 3.55 to 3.70 GHz on a licensed basis, a complicated sounding way of saying there now can be shared tiers.
    “It breaks down like this – using a three-tier sharing model, users are broken down into tiers based on priority that go from tier one, incumbent users, to tier two, commercial users with priority access licenses, and tier three, where general, authorized users live,” Bhatia said. “This categorization and shared access helps enable efficient use of finite spectrum resources.”
    With better indoor coverage and a high quality, reliable service, it should be something customers in those areas, whether commercial or residential, are pleased to utilize, as well.
    “The CBRS spectrum can be used for home broadband in rural or underserved areas where fiber or other forms of connectivity aren’t possible,” Bhatia said. “For enterprises, with the use of small-cell infrastructure supporting the CBRS bands, they can have direct control over their network coverage with high quality of service and little to no licensing fees, because the spectrum is shared.”
    It all works together to provide an exciting opportunity for MNOs and their customers.

    • 4 Min.
    These Cows Have 5G and You Don't with Ashish Jain & Kat Robinson

    These Cows Have 5G and You Don't with Ashish Jain & Kat Robinson

    The rollout of 5G is progressing at a deliberate pace, and while gamers and streaming video consumers are no doubt excited for the incredible speeds and low-latency connections that 5G provides, farmers are already using the technology to improve their operations. On this episode of Samsung's Recalibrate podcast, Ashish Jain, CEO and co-founder at KAIROS, and Kat Robinson of Samsung Networks shared their thoughts on the impact of 5G on smart agriculture.

    Robinson kicked off discussion with a stat from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization: “By 2050 the world population will increase to 9.6 billion so to feed all those people we have to increase food production by 70% using the same amount of land we have today,” she said. In order to meet the increasing demand for food, farmers are relying on smart systems, connected devices, and 5G projects like Me+Moo.

    Mee+Moo is a 5G initiative launched by RuralFirst in Scotland, which leverages 5G technology in cattle raising. Some 2,000 cows don connected collars and biometric ear tags that allow for better tracking and health monitoring over vast, remote areas. Farmers can proactively target sick cows and remove them from the herd to reduce the spread of infections. In addition, the cows are milked by an almost fully autonomous milking station, enabling farmers to optimize their time.

    Jain explained that current projects in smart agriculture are revealing the promise of autonomous farming systems. In his words, the end goal is “completely automating crop yield, soup to nuts, without a human involved.”

    He pointed to a project now in its third year called the ​Hands Free Hectare which involves crop production using autonomous tractors, drones, IoT sensors, and no human hands.

    “When you’re talking large scale vast areas of land, and the connectivity that you need and the latency and bandwidth requirements for things like drones and autonomous vehicles, that’s where 5G will really shine," Robinson said.

    Still, there are questions on whether using short-wavelength 5G signals are practical for large farms as longer-wavelength LTE signals are better at spanning great distances. Jain dismissed the concern.

    “5G is a combination of technology and will leverage the best technology suitable to the job," he said.

    Smart agriculture isn’t just about optimizing farm operations and reducing costs, it also can help produce higher-quality crops. The speakers reference a Californian vineyard experimenting with intelligent irrigation systems that know precisely when the soil needs to be watered in order to produce the best tasting grapes for superior wine. Let’s cheers to that!

    • 31 Min.
    Where Does 5G Fit into E-Sports? with Shawn Ambrose & Denis McInerny

    Where Does 5G Fit into E-Sports? with Shawn Ambrose & Denis McInerny

    Online gaming is a force to be reckoned with. In 2018, the gaming industry alone brought in $139 billion in revenue—more than the film industry, music streaming services, NFL, NBA, MLB, and NHL...combined. Major sports leagues have reason to shake in their boots, but there’s one sport that is joining forces with the gaming world to great result—racing. On this episode of Recalibrate, a Samsung podcast, we dove into the world of E-sports and online simulated racing with Sean Ambrose— commentator for The Global SimRacing Channel, a YouTube broadcaster for the online SimRacing platform iRacing, as well as Denis McInerny, MarketScale creative producer. Simulated car races have been around since the ’90s, but with recent improvements in streaming software and high-speed connections, real-time racing has (pun-intended) taken off. Ambrose described iRacing as “full immersion, simulated motorsports.” This means it reflects the likes of Nascar, Formula 1, and other high-profile global races. With a simple $200 at-home wheel-and-pedal setup and a modern computer, anyone can join in these high-intensity, high-profile races. The Global Sim Racing Channel (GSRC), broadcasts the races and plans the events from the ground up. From scheduling commentators, writing scripts, preparing graphics, and composing scoring, GSRC handles the step-by-step process to getting a simulated race to viewers and racers around the world. iRacing is for everyone, “Anywhere from 8 years old up to 68 years old,” Ambrose said. And the bridge between real-world racing and simulated racing is slimmer than you might think. Famous and successful racing drivers like Dale Earnheart Jr frequent iRacing. Competitors that meet on the platform often form in-person racing partnerships off-screen. Ambrose predicted “E-sports being a 2.5 billion market in 2023,” giving reason to believe that the race to democratize high-speed streaming simulated sports has just begun.

    • 40 Min.
    How 5G is Transforming the Computer in your Pocket

    How 5G is Transforming the Computer in your Pocket

    In just a few short decades, computers have developed from clunky, 30-pound hunks of table-top electronics into a sleek, high-functioning pocket device. This transformation is no better epitomized than with Samsung’s latest Galaxy cell phones, tiny but powerful pocket computers with up to 12GB of RAM and 1TB of storage.

    So how can we best utilize these powerful palm computers? On this episode of Recalibrate, we discussed how Samsung’s DeX integration capitalizes on the power of these pocket devices, and how its mobile technology’s capabilities can transform all kinds of industries, from manufacturing to healthcare.

    This Recalibrate episode is a technological deep dive into all things cloud computing with Reid Estreicher and Ray Couey of Samsung B2B, Dr. Simon Lok, CTO of RGNets, and host Jason Claybrook. Estreicher said it best when he describes the Samsung Galaxy S10 as “a really tiny computer.” And with the power of such a laptop in your hand, DeX then comes into play, using this operating system as a tether for in-the-moment cloud-based work.

    “DeX is a way that allows you to bring the hardware power of it into a realm where the user experience is such that you can actually harness that," Dr. Lok said. The limitations of working on a small screen are eliminated with DeX. By using external input devices, the DeX feature can make a working computer out of any TV or monitor.

    So how is this feature used in our daily lives? Picture being a doctor or nurse, bustling throughout a hospital from floor to floor. With a DeX device, your operating system goes with you, creating a “centralized cluster of machines,” wherever you are.

    Additionally, DeX adds the privacy feature of secure access, via fingerprint or retina read, as opposed to the chaos of working on an open workstation. With a computer in our pockets, tech’s top thinkers elaborate on the power of mobile technology and its implications across industries on this episode of Recalibrate.

    • 42 Min.

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