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Linguist Nicole Holliday and Wall Street Journal language columnist Ben Zimmer discuss the ways language is changing, talk to scholars and writers, and set and solve word puzzles.

Spectacular Vernacular Slate Podcasts

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    • 4,8 • 22 Bewertungen

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Linguist Nicole Holliday and Wall Street Journal language columnist Ben Zimmer discuss the ways language is changing, talk to scholars and writers, and set and solve word puzzles.

Anhören in Apple Podcasts
Erfordert ein Abo und macOS 11.4 (oder neuer)

    Taking a Trip Down Language Lane

    Taking a Trip Down Language Lane

    On today’s episode of Spectacular Vernacular, Nicole and Ben take a trip down memory lane and put their knowledge of past guests to the test. They also interview the founder and CEO of Planet Word, Ann Friedman. And finally, we’re taking our final virtual trip, this time to Northern Ireland, for some cinematic wordplay. Thanks for listening and playing along with us! 
    Produced by Jasmine Ellis. 
    Here are some notes and references from this week’s show:
    Planet Word 
    Information on Planet Word’s new wordplay adventure, Lexicon Lane 
    Ann Friedman, “From the Founder: Disputes on the Language Front” 
    Subscribe to Slate Plus. It’s only $1 for the first month. To learn more, go to slate.com/spectacularplus.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 32 Min.
    Dialects vs. Languages

    Dialects vs. Languages

    On today’s episode of Spectacular Vernacular, Nicole and Ben talk about the difference between a dialect and a language as they revisit a prior conversation about Ukraine. They also interview Will Shortz, crossword puzzle editor at the New York Times, about how he got into the world of puzzles. And finally, our hosts are in the hot seat for a wordplay quiz set by the puzzle master himself. You don’t want to miss this! You could win a year’s membership to Slate Plus.
    Do you have any language questions or fun facts to share? Email us at spectacular@slate.com.  
    Produced by Jasmine Ellis. 
    Here are some notes and references from this week’s show:
    Cambridge Language Surveys, “The Slavic Languages” (including Russian, Ukrainian, Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian) 
    Phillip M. Carter, “Long before shots were fired, a linguistic power struggle was playing out in Ukraine”
    Information on the American Crossword Puzzle Tournament (April 1-3) 
    Register here for the ACPT’s non-competitive virtual event  
    Ben’s article on how Stephen Sondheim popularized cryptic crosswords in the U.S. 
    Ben, Nicole, and Will compete in Webster’s War of the Words, a fundraiser for the Noah Webster House
    Subscribe to Slate Plus. It’s only $1 for the first month. To learn more, go to slate.com/spectacularplus.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 30 Min.
    New Siri. Who’s This?

    New Siri. Who’s This?

    On today’s episode of Spectacular Vernacular, Nicole and Ben talk about the new Siri voices. They also interview Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne, hosts of Lingthusiasm, a podcast that's enthusiastic about linguistics. And finally, they put a listener’s anagram skills to the test. You don’t want to miss this! You could win a year’s membership to Slate Plus.
    Do you have any language questions or fun facts to share? Email us at spectacular@slate.com.  
    Produced by Jasmine Ellis and June Thomas. 
    Here are some notes and references from this week’s show:
    Consumer Reports, “Hey Siri, Is That You? Apple’s New Voices Resonate With Some Black iPhone Users” 
    Spectacular Vernacular interview with VocalID founder Rupal Patel on “choosing your voice” 
    Axios, “Apple gives Siri a less gendered voice”
    Gretchen McCulloch and Lauren Gawne’s podcast, Lingthusiasm 
    Lingthusiasm on Patreon 
    Subscribe to Slate Plus. It’s only $1 for the first month. To learn more, go to slate.com/spectacularplus.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 37 Min.
    “Who Dey” vs. “Who Dat”

    “Who Dey” vs. “Who Dat”

    On today’s episode of Spectacular Vernacular, Nicole and Ben talk about the connection between football chants and language. They also interview Everdeen Mason, editorial director for games at the New York Times about her exciting role. And finally, our hosts are in the hot seat for this week’s wordplay. You don’t want to miss this! You could win a year’s membership to Slate Plus.
    Do you have any language questions or fun facts to share? Email us at spectacular@slate.com.  
    Produced by Jasmine Ellis and Asha Saluja. 

    Here are some notes and references from this week’s show:
    Ben’s Wall Street Journal column, “’Who Dey?’: A Chant With Roots in Black History” 
    New York Times profile of Everdeen Mason 
    How to apply to the New York Times Diverse Crossword Constructor Fellowship 
    Washington Post article on “the latest reckoning over language in the puzzle world” 
    New York Times article on the acquisition of Wordle 
    Peter Gordon’s Fireball Crosswords 
    Subscribe to Slate Plus. It’s only $1 for the first month. To learn more, go to slate.com/spectacularplus.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 36 Min.
    Capital Language From Kyiv to Washington, D.C.

    Capital Language From Kyiv to Washington, D.C.

    On today’s episode of Spectacular Vernacular, Nicole and Ben talk about how the capital of Ukraine has become a linguistic hot take. They also interview Jessi Grieser, a professor at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville about her new book, The Black Side of the River: Race, Language, and Belonging in Washington D.C. And finally, we bring on a listener for some wordplay. We hope you’re good at figuring out analogies. You could win a year’s membership to Slate Plus.
    Do you have any language questions or fun facts to share? Email us at spectacular@slate.com.  
    Produced by Jasmine Ellis and Asha Saluja

    Here are some notes and references from this week’s show:
    New York Times: “How Do You Say Kyiv? It Can Be Hard for English Speakers” 
    NPR “Kyiv or Kiev? Why people disagree about how to pronounce the Ukrainian capital’s name” 
    Jessi Grieser: The Black Side of the River: Race, Language, and Belonging in Washington, D.C. 
    “Bad Analogies” on Twitter
    Subscribe to Slate Plus. It’s only $1 for the first month. To learn more, go to slate.com/spectacularplus.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 33 Min.
    The Making of Wordle

    The Making of Wordle

    On today’s episode of Spectacular Vernacular, Nicole and Ben interview Brooklyn-based software engineer Josh Wardle, the creator of the viral online word game Wordle. They also recap their participation in the American Dialect Society’s annual Word of the Year vote, over which Ben presided. And Nicole’s shares some on-the-ground interviews from the Linguistic Society of America conference, at which she presented some of her own research. And finally, we bring on a listener for some wordplay. Can you solve our final wordplay clue? You could win a year’s membership to Slate Plus.
    Do you have any language questions or fun facts to share? Email us at spectacular@slate.com.  

    Subscribe to Slate Plus. It’s only $1 for the first month. To learn more, go to slate.com/spectacularplus.

    Produced by Jasmine Ellis and Kevin Bendis
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 38 Min.

Kundenrezensionen

4,8 von 5
22 Bewertungen

22 Bewertungen

NicknameJOAN1 ,

great

Using his TEDTalk in my language courses led me to this show. Wish we could just listen to this all class period!

vermontjunkie ,

Fun to listen to, but imperfect

Fun and interesting podcast on words and their intriguing backgrounds. However, there are some linguistic imperfections to be noticed. For instance: how is French a tonal language?! If you mean I towing all having a different internation patterns in English, then yes. Yet, this is not what the word “tonal” with respects to a language means at all! Mandarin and Cantonese, as well as other Asian languages or Tona languages, changing the meaning of a word by the internation of which. Speaking with a French accent, doesn’t make French a tonal language!

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