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The official podcast of the Columbia Science and Technology Law Review

STLR Conversations Columbia Science and Technology Law Review

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The official podcast of the Columbia Science and Technology Law Review

    Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation (SLAPPs) with Evan Mascagni

    Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation (SLAPPs) with Evan Mascagni

    This episode features Julio Sharp-Wasserman, Former STLR Notes Editor, talking with Evan Mascagni about Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation, or SLAPPs. A SLAPP is a non-meritorious lawsuit brought to retaliate against a defendant’s constitutionally-protected speech, or to silence a defendant from criticizing the plaintiff, even when such criticism is completely legal.  
    Evan Mascagni is the Policy Director of the Public Participation Project, which is working to get congress to pass a federal Anti-SLAPP statute.  Evan is a former attorney turned documentary filmmaker and First Amendment policy advocate.  Prior to moving to New York City and starting a film production company, Player Piano, he was an attorney with the California Anti-SLAPP Project, a public interest law firm and policy organization dedicated to fighting SLAPPs in California. 
    We’d love your help in making this podcast better. If you like what we’re doing, please subscribe, rate, and give a review on iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d also love to hear from you. Please send us an email at STLRpodcast@gmail.com.
     
    Links Discussed in the Show
    https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20190319/10212841825/rep-devin-nunes-sues-internet-cow-saying-mean-things-about-him-online.shtml
    https://anti-slapp.org/
    https://www.protecttheprotest.org/
     
     
    Nothing in this podcast should be considered legal advice. If you think you need legal assistance, consult a lawyer, not a podcast.
    Opening and Closing Themes by Jonathan Coulton ("The Future Soon" and "Ikea")

    • 31 Min.
    Changing Spaces in Data Privacy with Vivek Narayanadas and Andy Dale

    Changing Spaces in Data Privacy with Vivek Narayanadas and Andy Dale

    This episode features Lloyd Lee, STLR Staffer, talking with Vivek Narayanadas and Andy Dale about changing spaces in data privacy in the US and abroad.
    We’d love your help in making this podcast better. If you like what we’re doing, please subscribe, rate, and give a review on iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d also love to hear from you. Please send us an email at STLRpodcast@gmail.com.
    Nothing in this podcast should be considered legal advice. If you think you need legal assistance, consult a lawyer, not a podcast.
     
    Opening and Closing Themes by Jonathan Coulton ("The Future Soon" and "Ikea")

    • 51 Min.
    Abandoned DNA and the Fourth Amendment with Dr. Thomas Holland

    Abandoned DNA and the Fourth Amendment with Dr. Thomas Holland

    This episode features Isha Agarwal, STLR Staffer, talking with Dr. Thomas Holland about DNA and the Fourth Amendment
    As DNA analysis becomes more ubiquitous in our lives and in the criminal justice system, it is important to examine the current legal landscape of abandoned evidence in the context of genetic data. Abandoned evidence has a long and rich judicial history, from Russian spies to prison barbers. But abandoned DNA may not fit so neatly into this mold under the Fourth Amendment, and as DNA analysis begins to come straight to our doorstep, we must also analyze what privacy protections we do and don't have.
    Dr. Holland’s article can be found in our most recent issue. To find that article, and all our content examining the intersection of science, technology, and the law, visit our website, STLR.org.
    We’d love your help in making this podcast better. If you like what we’re doing, please subscribe, rate, and give a review on iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d also love to hear from you. Please send us an email at STLRpodcast@gmail.com.
    Nothing in this podcast should be considered legal advice. If you think you need legal assistance, consult a lawyer, not a podcast.
    Opening and Closing Themes by Jonathan Coulton ("The Future Soon" and "Ikea")

    • 46 Min.
    Compulsory Vaccine Laws with Vincent Racaniello and Erwin Chemerinsky

    Compulsory Vaccine Laws with Vincent Racaniello and Erwin Chemerinsky

    This episode features Sam Matthews, STLR Executive Submissions Editor, discussing the constitutionality of compulsory vaccine laws Professor Vincent Racaniello of Columbia University and Dean Erwin Chemerinsky of Berkeley Law School.
     
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    Vincent Racaniello is Higgins Professor of Microbiology and Immunology at Columbia University. He has done laboratory research on viruses for over 30 years. Following on his belief that scientists must communicate their work to the public, he has co-authored a virology textbook, distributed videocasts of his virology lectures online, written a blog about viruses, and produced podcasts on viruses, parasites, bacteria, evolution, and immunology. His goal is to be Earth’s Virology Professor.
     
    Professor Racaniello’s virology lectures can be found online at youtube.com/profvrr. His Podcasts can be found at microbe.tv, and his virology blog can be found at virology.ws.
     
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    Erwin Chemerinsky became the 13th Dean of Berkeley Law on July 1, 2017, when he joined the faculty as the Jesse H. Choper Distinguished Professor of Law. Prior to assuming this position, from 2008-2017, he was the founding Dean and Distinguished Professor of Law, and Raymond Pryke Professor of First Amendment Law, at University of California, Irvine School of Law. Before that he was a professor at Duke University from 2004-2008, and from 1983-2004 was a professor at the University of Southern California Law School.
     
    He is the author of eleven books, including leading casebooks and treatises about constitutional law, criminal procedure, and federal jurisdiction.  His most recent books are: We the People:  A Progressive Reading of the Constitution for the Twenty-First Century (Picador Macmillan) published in November 2018, and two books published by Yale University Press in 2017, Closing the Courthouse Doors: How Your Constitutional Rights Became Unenforceable and Free Speech on Campus (with Howard Gillman). He frequently argues appellate cases, including in the United States Supreme Court.
     
    In 2016, he was named a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.  In January 2017, National Jurist magazine again named Dean Chemerinsky as the most influential person in legal education in the United States.
     
    Dean Chemerinsky’s Essay, Compulsory Vaccination Laws are Constitutional, was published in 2016 by the Northwestern University Law Review.
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    To find all of our podcast episodes, and our other content content examining the intersection of science, technology, and the law, visit our website, STLR.org.
     
    We’d love your help in making this podcast better. If you like what we’re doing, please subscribe, rate, and give a review on iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d also love to hear from you. Please send us an email at STLRpodcast@gmail.com.
     
    Nothing in this podcast should be considered legal advice. If you think you need legal assistance, consult a lawyer, not a podcast.
     
    Music by Jonathan Coulton ("The Future Soon,” “First of May,” and "Ikea")

    • 31 Min.
    Moran Yemini on The New Irony of Free Speech

    Moran Yemini on The New Irony of Free Speech

    This episode features Jennifer Ange, STLR Staffer, talking with Dr. Moran Yemini about the freedom of speech in the new digital age.

    In his recent article published on STLR, Dr. Yemini argues that the digital age presents a new irony of free speech. The popular concept that the Internet promotes freedom of expression may be too simplistic. In his view, the Internet, while it strengthens our capacity of expression, also limits the liberty aspect of expression.

    Dr. Yemini received his Ph.D. in Law from the University of Haifa, where he is also a Senior Fellow at the Center for Cyber, Law & Policy. He is currently a Visiting Fellow at the Information Society Project at Yale Law School, and at the Digital Life Initiative at Cornell Tech. Dr Yemini’s article THE NEW IRONY OF FREE SPEECH can be found in our most recent issue. To find that article, and all our content examining the intersection of science, technology, and the law, please visit our website, STLR.org. 

    We’d love your help in making this podcast better. If you like what we’re doing, please subscribe, rate, and give a review on iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. We’d also love to hear from you. Please send us an email at STLRpodcast@gmail.com.

    Nothing in this podcast should be considered legal advice. If you think you need legal assistance, consult a lawyer, not a podcast.

    Opening and Closing Themes by Jonathan Coulton ("The Future Soon" and "Ikea")

    • 39 Min.
    Julio Sharp-Wasserman on Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act

    Julio Sharp-Wasserman on Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act

    Section 230 prevents some online intermediaries, such as operators of websites, from being sued for the actions of third parties. For example, if someone uploads a defamatory video to YouTube, the person being defamed could sue the creator of the video, but couldn’t sue YouTube itself. Julio argues that, in the specific context of speech torts, there are other protections for online intermediaries, and the results of lawsuits against them might be the same, even if Section 230 didn’t exist.

    • 45 Min.

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