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Ever wonder how to develop your lyrics and actually write about something that's meaningful to you in a way that other people get it? The Stories in Songs Podcast is all about helping you look beyond lyric structure and form and concentrate on what's important: your lyric's message and how to deliver it. So learn how to wield the Power of Storytelling and Write Lyrics that truly make an Impact.I believe songs have the power to save lives. That's why I help musicians write powerful & engaging lyrics so that they get more fans and skyrocketing sales.Because here's the truth:SONGS ARE TOO VALUABLE TO BE STUFFED WITH BAD LYRICS.Songs have a purpose. They can change lives.Give your lyrics the power to make an impact.That's why the Stories in Songs podcast helps musicians write powerful & engaging lyrics so that they get more fans and sky🚀 sales. In this podcast, you'll learn how to use the power of storytelling for your own songwriting. You'll also get tips and tricks on how to analyze your songs so that you can create some amazing lyrics without hitting writer's block ever again. Hit subscribe and get ready to become a songwriting ninja.

Stories in Songs - Writing the Lyrics Melanie - Certified Story Grid Editor

    • Musik
    • 5,0 • 1 Bewertung

Ever wonder how to develop your lyrics and actually write about something that's meaningful to you in a way that other people get it? The Stories in Songs Podcast is all about helping you look beyond lyric structure and form and concentrate on what's important: your lyric's message and how to deliver it. So learn how to wield the Power of Storytelling and Write Lyrics that truly make an Impact.I believe songs have the power to save lives. That's why I help musicians write powerful & engaging lyrics so that they get more fans and skyrocketing sales.Because here's the truth:SONGS ARE TOO VALUABLE TO BE STUFFED WITH BAD LYRICS.Songs have a purpose. They can change lives.Give your lyrics the power to make an impact.That's why the Stories in Songs podcast helps musicians write powerful & engaging lyrics so that they get more fans and sky🚀 sales. In this podcast, you'll learn how to use the power of storytelling for your own songwriting. You'll also get tips and tricks on how to analyze your songs so that you can create some amazing lyrics without hitting writer's block ever again. Hit subscribe and get ready to become a songwriting ninja.

    #32 - “You Shouldn't Kiss Me Like This” by Toby Keith – Making Your Song’s Character Fall in Love

    #32 - “You Shouldn't Kiss Me Like This” by Toby Keith – Making Your Song’s Character Fall in Love

    #032 - In today’s episode, we’ll go through the lyrics of the song “You Shouldn't Kiss Me Like This” by Toby Keith.
    The lyrics are so amazing to see how much the power of storytelling influences your audience’s engagement.
    The song is written so great, and the lyrics show you how you can make your song’s character fall in love.
    And you’ll learn exactly how you can pull that off too by using Pat Pattison’s Development Engine of the three boxes as an outline and fill it with life by looking at this song’s narrative techniques.
    Furthermore, they offer you lots of great insights you can take away from them – especially when it comes to using the power of storytelling to keep listeners engaged from the first phrase to the last.
    Episode Overview:
    [00:01:29] The S.O.N.G. Framework
    [00:02:19] “You Shouldn't Kiss Me Like This” by Toby Keith
    [00:04:20] Step 1: Summary - What is the song about?
    [00:12:08] Step 2: Observer - Who is the main character of the song?
    [00:18:55] Step 3: Narration - Analyzing the storytelling craft.
    [00:21:53] Analyzing the scene told in the song.
    [00:27:30] The Change
    [00:29:35] Writing Techniques
    [00:32:32] Step 4: Gist - What is the message of the song?
    [00:34:57] What we've learned from “You Shouldn't Kiss Me Like This”
    [00:38:19] Song Exercise - The First Kiss

    Links mentioned in this episode:
    You Shouldn't Kiss Me Like This lyrics © Tokeco TunesFinding Topics to Write about by Looking at Universal Human Values“Rumor” by Lee Brice – Using Multiple Love Story ConventionsA Songwriter’s Six Best Friends - ADVANCED: The Story Grid Diorama Model“Shut Up and Kiss Me” by Mary Chapin Carpenter – Avoiding Contradictions in LyricsDevelop your Lyric's Verses by Using Progressive ComplicationsEvery Character WANTS something. But how do you figure out WHAT that is?To get your free gift: Uncover Irresistible Lyric Ideas go to lyrics.storiesinsongs.comTag me on Facebook: @LyricArtistsTag me on Instagram: @stories.in.songs
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    • 42 Min.
    #31 - Creating Conflict by Using a Character's Wants and Needs (+ WORKSHEET)

    #31 - Creating Conflict by Using a Character's Wants and Needs (+ WORKSHEET)

    #031 - The Wants and Needs of a Song’s Character and How They Can Engage Your Listeners through Creating Conflict.

    Did you know that listeners are drawn to specific topics of lyrics because they strive to get similar things in their lives as the character in the song? 
    When you think about your lyrics this way, it’s much easier to see the kind of target audience you want as a songwriter because your future listener will enjoy investing themselves in your song’s characters.
    But how can you decide what your character strives for and what he wants or needs?Where to start?And how do their Wants and Needs influence each other to create a compelling narrative?I’m glad you asked.
    In today’s episode, I’m happy to share with you some storytelling tips on how you can write a compelling story for your song by creating some spicy conflict.

    Episode Overview:
    [00:01:24] What does your song’s character want?
    [00:04:29] What does your song’s character need?
    [00:11:02] Wants, Needs, and Conflict
    [00:12:29] Conflicting Conscious and Unconscious Desires
    [00:14:44] “Eye of the Tiger” by Survivor
    [00:16:16] Tips for writing lyrics with Conflicting Conscious and Unconscious Desires
    [00:19:51] Conflicting Conscious Desires and Unrecognized Needs
    [00:21:27] “Welcome to the Black Parade” by My Chemical Romance
    [00:26:23] Tips for writing lyrics with Conflicting Conscious Desires and Unrecognized Needs
    [00:29:06] Everybody wants to be different, but nobody wants to change.


    Links mentioned in this episode:
    Development Engine: Pattinson's 3 Boxes - ADVANCED: 5 Commandments of StorytellingEvery Character in a Story WANTS something. But how do you figure out WHAT that is?3 Ways to Develop your Song's Character by Looking at Internal Content Genres“Eye of the Tiger” by Survivor © Wb Music Corp., Sony/atv Melody, Easy Action Music“Welcome to the Black Parade” by My Chemical Romance © BLOW THE DOORS OFF CHICAGOWORKSHEET: https://resources.storiesinsongs.com/To get your free gift: Uncover Irresistible Lyric Ideas go to lyrics.storiesinsongs.comTag me on Facebook: @LyricArtistsTag me on Instagram: @stories.in.songs
    Support the show

    • 33 Min.
    #30 - 3 Ways to Develop your Song's Character Using Internal Content Genres

    #30 - 3 Ways to Develop your Song's Character Using Internal Content Genres

    #30 - Write a song that shows a meaningful transformation of your song’s main character. Here's how you can do that.

    Do you want to tell your audience about someone who had to change a part of who they are to get what they actually needed?
    Does it interest you not only to write lyrics about external challenges but also to discover how those external challenges affect and change a person internally?
    Are you fascinated by character arcs because you wanna see how a person has started out at one point in their life and what circumstances led to becoming a different person?
    In today’s bite-sized episode, we’ll talk about three different areas that are at your disposal to show a meaningful change in how your song’s character thinks, acts, or is perceived by others and themselves.
    We’ll do that by looking at internal content genres. 
    What that means? 
    Well, you’re about to find out.

    Episode Overview:
    [00:01:01] Stories are about change. But what kind?
    [00:05:04] Internal Content Gerne - Definition
    [00:07:44] The three Internal Genres
    [00:08:53] Internal Genre: Status
    [00:15:19] Internal Genre: Worldview
    [00:19:29] Internal Genre: Morality
    [00:24:28] Summary: Internal Content Genres


    Links mentioned in this episode:
    “Stuck With Me” by Green Day – Stuck With Me lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc, Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLCLive Like You Were Dying lyrics © Warner Chappell Music, Inc, Round Hill Music Big Loud Songs, BMG Rights ManagementDevelop your Lyric's Verses by Using Progressive ComplicationsTo get your free gift: Uncover Irresistible Lyric Ideas go to lyrics.storiesinsongs.comTag me on Facebook: @LyricArtistsTag me on Instagram: @stories.in.songs
    Support the show

    • 27 Min.
    #29 - Every Character WANTS something. But how to figure out WHAT that is?

    #29 - Every Character WANTS something. But how to figure out WHAT that is?

    #029 - Let's create a character for your song who does what's necessary to get what they want. And besides, we also figure out WHAT a character might want.

    In a story, the main character actively pursues a goal, right?
    I don’t think you’ve ever gone to the movies to watch someone sitting on the couch all day and doing nothing. We watch a story to follow a certain character in their journey of how they’re trying to achieve something, more precisely, a certain goal.
    And when it comes to writing lyrics, your song’s character also needs to WANT something.
    But how do you figure out what your character might be after? What is it they want?
    If you have trouble finding an answer to that question, this podcast episode will give you some great insights on where you can look to easily find out some great possibilities of your character’s want. And the good thing is: we are talking about possibilities that have been proven in how they hook and engage the audience since there were stories. So it can’t get any better than that.
    So let’s find out how we can easily figure out what our song’s character might want. So that we don’t create a character that’s sitting on the couch, never leaves his house, and does nothing. But someone who will do what’s necessary to get what they want.


    Episode Overview:
    [00:01:57] Recap: Universal Human Values
    [00:04:16] External Content Genre
    [00:06:22] Hierarchy of Needs
    [00:08:13] What does your character WANT?
    [00:10:22] Physiological Needs – Action Stories
    [00:11:22] Safety Needs – Crime, War, Thriller, Horror, Western
    [00:13:30] Love and Belonging - Love Story
    [00:14:08] Esteem – Performance and Society Stories
    [00:15:36] Now, why is it so important to know what your character wants?
    [00:17:10] Don’t forget: Why do they want it?


    Links mentioned in this episode:
    A Songwriter’s Six Best Friends - ADVANCED: The Story Grid Diorama ModelDevelopment Engine: Pattinson's 3 Boxes - ADVANCED: 5 Commandments of Storytelling https://storiesinsongs.com/podcast/episode-026/Develop your Lyric's Verses by Using Progressive Complications https://storiesinsongs.com/podcast/episode-027/Finding Topics to Write about by Looking at Universal Human Values: https://storiesinsongs.com/podcast/episode-023/Crafting Your Story Spine Using Literal and Essential Wants & NeedsObjects of Desire, Objects of ConflictTo get your free gift: Uncover Irresistible Lyric Ideas go to lyrics.storiesinsongs.comTag me on Facebook: @LyricArtistsTag me on Instagram: @stories.in.songs
    Support the show

    • 22 Min.
    #28 - “Shut Up and Kiss Me” by Mary Chapin Carpenter – Avoiding Contradictions in Lyrics

    #28 - “Shut Up and Kiss Me” by Mary Chapin Carpenter – Avoiding Contradictions in Lyrics

    #028 -  Today we’ll do our third lyric study about the love story moment of the first kiss.
    More specifically, we’ll talk a little more about the tension, and the anticipation BEFORE the first kiss happens. After all, that’s an incredible feeling to be moments away from that first kiss while the butterflies are rushing in roller coasters through your tummy.
    But we also point out what can completely ruin that special moment. And you should be aware of avoiding that mistake in your own lyric writing. 
    Wanna find out more about this?


    Episode Overview:
    [00:02:06] What you’ll learn in this episode
    [00:03:31] “Shut Up and Kiss Me” by Mary Chapin Carpenter
    [00:05:44] Step 1: Summary - What is the song about?
    [00:11:39] Step 2: Observer - Who is the main character of the song?
    [00:22:43] Step 3: Narration - Analyzing the storytelling craft.
    [00:27:14] Analyzing the scene told in the song.
    [00:29:54] The Change
    [00:32:04] Writing Techniques
    [00:38:10] Step 4: Gist - What is the message of the song?
    [00:38:20] What we've learned from "Shut Up and Kiss Me"
    [00:42:45] Song Exercise - The First Kiss


    Links mentioned in this episode:
    Shut Up and Kiss Me lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing GroupFinding Topics to Write about by Looking at Universal Human Values“Kiss Me Slowly” by Parachute – Why Change is Better than Repetition“Rumor” by Lee Brice – Using Multiple Love Story ConventionsA Songwriter’s Six Best Friends - ADVANCED: The Story Grid Diorama ModelDevelopment Engine: Pattinson's 3 Boxes - ADVANCED: 5 Commandments of StorytellingTo get your free gift: Uncover Irresistible Lyric Ideas go to lyrics.storiesinsongs.comTag me on Facebook: @LyricArtistsTag me on Instagram: @stories.in.songs
    Support the show

    • 51 Min.
    #27 - Develop your Lyric's Verses by Using Progressive Complications (+ WORKSHEET)

    #27 - Develop your Lyric's Verses by Using Progressive Complications (+ WORKSHEET)

    #027 - Do you want to make it progressively worse for your song's character? Then find out how you can use progressive complications to develop your lyric verses.

    Do you struggle with writing the second verse?
    Do you have problems developing your song’s idea and creating an outline?
    You might have already looked at some ways how to come up with ideas to overcome being stuck in writing the second verse.
    Maybe you have tried to use Pat Pattison’s concept of the three boxes, but you still feel a little stuck.
    In today’s episode, we talk about the song “Hero of War” by Rise Against to find out how using progressive complications can actually help you develop your idea, take it through the boxes, and write about something that will really make an impact.

    Episode Overview:
    [00:01:19] Recap: The Three Boxes & The Five Commandments of Storytelling
    [00:01:51] Development Engine – 3 Boxes
    [00:03:09] Five Commandments of Storytelling
    [00:03:48] Do we need to state every commandment in lyrics?
    [00:05:16] “Hero of War” by Rise Against
    [00:07:51] The Five Commandments for “Hero of War”
    [00:10:12] Progressive Complications in “Hero of War”
    [00:17:22] Progressive Complications – Summary
    [00:18:59] Progressive Complications and the 3 Boxes


    Links mentioned in this episode:
    The Most Important Element of a Story that Works – How to Show a Change between Beginning and EndingDevelopment Engine: Pattinson's 3 Boxes - ADVANCED: 5 Commandments of StorytellingHero of War lyrics © Sony/atv Tunes Llc, Do It To Win MusicProgressive Complications - Article on the Story Grid WebsiteTo get your free gift: Uncover Irresistible Lyric Ideas go to lyrics.storiesinsongs.comTag me on Facebook: @LyricArtistsTag me on Instagram: @stories.in.songs
    Support the show

    • 23 Min.

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