105 Folgen

Aven & Mark discuss etymology, history, literature, language, and cocktails, and the sometimes surprising connections between them all.

The Endless Knot Mark Sundaram & Aven McMaster

    • Geschichte
    • 5,0 • 2 Bewertungen

Aven & Mark discuss etymology, history, literature, language, and cocktails, and the sometimes surprising connections between them all.

    Heavy Metal Music and Antiquity, with Jeremy Swist

    Heavy Metal Music and Antiquity, with Jeremy Swist

    We talked to Jeremy Swist about his work on the reception of antiquity in heavy metal music. He discussed the ways the genre looks to the past for stories and imagery, and the many fantastic songs and albums that have been produced from this mix. We also talked about the problems with racism and white nationalism that can plague the intersection of the ancient world and metal music.
    Playlist of the songs Jeremy mentioned
    Pour Forth Surquidous track
    @MetalClassicist
    Heavy Metal and the Ancient World on Facebook
    Jeremy’s blog
    Metal-archives.com
    Transcript of this episode
    This episode on YouTube
    Our Patreon page
    Redbubble store
    This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
    The Endless Knot RSS

    • 1 Std. 19 Min.
    The Monster Episode of Monsters

    The Monster Episode of Monsters

    It’s Halloween, and the monsters are out! In this episode we tackle Monster Theory (as formulated by J.J. Cohen) , examine the linguistic and cultural origins of a range of Classical and classic movie monsters, look at how they connect to the history of currency and money, and explore the intersections of monsters and the New Woman. We also sample a beautiful cocktail from the upcoming cocktail book Nectar of the Gods by Liv Albert from “Let’s Talk about Myths, Baby”. Thank you, Liv!
    The Monster video
    Monster Theory by J.J. Cohen
    Tracking Classical Monsters in Popular Culture by Liz Gloyn
    Our podcast episode interviewing Dr. Gloyn
    Horace Odes 1.37
    Hesiod passage about Medusa is Theogony 270ff; more info about Medusa here
    Ovid passage about Medusa is Metamorphoses 4.753ff
    General sources for this episode
    Transcript of this episode
    This episode on YouTube
    Our Patreon page
    Redbubble store
    This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
    The Endless Knot RSS

    • 2 Std 12 Min.
    Aegyptiaca Romana, with Bet Hucks

    Aegyptiaca Romana, with Bet Hucks

    We speak to Bet Hucks about Roman importation and love of Egyptian art and other cultural material, the importance of thinking about material remains in assemblages and considering the contexts in which they were displayed, and some innovative ways of bringing the physical experiences of the past to modern audiences. Oh, and also, crocodiles!
    Bet’s Twitter: @RomanAegyptiaca
    Bet on academia.edu
    Thanks to Emma Pauly for editing and transcription of this episode.
    Transcript of this episode
    This episode on YouTube
    Our Patreon page
    Redbubble store
    This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
    The Endless Knot RSS

    • 55 Min.
    What's the Earliest English Word?

    What's the Earliest English Word?

    What do you think the earliest English word was? How could we possibly look for such a thing, and what do the possible options tell us about early English history and the movement of peoples in the early medieval period? We tackle these questions, in an episode about Angles, Saxons, Jutes, Frisians, Celts, Tacitus, Bede, and more.
    Reminder: Mark will be running another session of his Speakeasy seminar course, The Origins of English: Learning to Think Like an Etymologist, which is open to anyone who’s interested. Registration is now open at Speakeasy.com for the session running on Sunday afternoons (Eastern time) from September 12th October 3rd.
    Recipe for Old English cocktail
    Earliest English Word video
    Jabzy’s Anglo-Saxon Invasion video
    The Early Greek Alphabets: Origin, Diffusion, chpt 4 by Rosalind Thomas
    C. Krebs, A MOST DANGEROUS BOOK: TACITUS’ GERMANIA FROM THE ROMAN EMPIRE TO THE THIRD REICH. London: W.W.Norton & Co., 2011.
    Other sources
    Why do Poles call Italy WŁOCHY? (video)
    Bonus episode about the term “Anglo-Saxon” from December 2019
    Transcript of this episode
    This episode on YouTube
    Our Patreon page
    Redbubble store
    This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
    The Endless Knot RSS

    • 1 Std. 25 Min.
    Reckonings, with Stephen Chrisomalis

    Reckonings, with Stephen Chrisomalis

    It’s time for a reckoning! Or, to be more accurate, a number of reckonings. We talk to Dr. Stephen Chrisomalis, a linguistic anthropologist who specializes in the anthropology of mathematics and the interaction of language, cognition, and culture, about his new book Reckonings. It’s a fascinating discussion of how we write and represent numbers, and how that’s changed over the years. Why don’t we use Roman numerals any more? It’s more complicated than you might think…
    Announcement: Mark will be running another session of his Speakeasy seminar course, The Origins of English: Learning to Think Like an Etymologist, which is open to anyone who’s interested. Registration is now open at Speakeasy.com for the session running on Sunday afternoons (Eastern time) from September 12th October 3rd.
    Glossographia (blog)
    Twitter: @schrisomalis
    Wayne State University faculty page
    Reckonings webpage
    Transcript of this episode
    This episode on YouTube
    Our Patreon page
    Redbubble store
    This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
    The Endless Knot RSS

    • 1 Std. 13 Min.
    Catullus & Shibari, with Isobel Williams

    Catullus & Shibari, with Isobel Williams

    We talked to Isobel Williams about her fascinating and illuminating new translation of selected poems of Catullus, illustrated with her drawings of the Japanese art of rope binding, shibari. Our discussion ranges over the connections between the world of shibari and the emotional struggles depicted in Catullus’s poetry, the way translation and learning Latin can feel like being tied up in, and untangling, knots, and much more.
    Content Note: fetish, sex, brief mention of sexual violence, discussion of enslavement and use of slavery as metaphor
    Blog about drawing shibari (Japanese rope bondage): Boulevardisme
    Straight blog about drawing: Drawing from an uncomfortable position
    Website: Isobel Williams
    Twitter: @otium_Catulle
    Instagram: @isobelwilliams2525
    From Isobel: “For the online book launch, I compiled a video (>20 minutes) of self and others reading in Latin and English from the book. It starts with Sappho in ancient Greek and ends with Shakespeare, to show the continuity Sappho -> Catullus -> Ovid -> Shakespeare (it contains no Ovid). The video is here 'Catullus: Shibari Carmina' - readings and performances - YouTube”
    Page about the book
    Link to the book for Canada and US: Catullus: Shibari Carmina | Independent Publishers Group
    James Methven’s Precious Asses – highly recommended
    Irish poet and mediaevalist Bernard O’Donoghue – Poet, Academic, Medievalist and Literary Critic
    Transcript of this episode
    This episode on YouTube
    Our Patreon page
    Redbubble store
    This podcast is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
    The Endless Knot RSS

    • 1 Std. 22 Min.

Kundenrezensionen

5,0 von 5
2 Bewertungen

2 Bewertungen

123jayjayjay123 ,

Knowledge and cocktails

Two scholars discuss many interesting topics over cocktails. What is there not to like? #RelationshipGoals

Top‑Podcasts in Geschichte

Das gefällt dir vielleicht auch