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The Oriental Institute is a research organization and museum devoted to the study of the ancient Near East. Founded in 1919 by James Henry Breasted, the Institute, a part of the University of Chicago, is an internationally recognized pioneer in the archaeology, philology, and history of early Near Eastern civilizations.

The Oriental Institute The University of Chicago

    • Gesellschaft und Kultur

The Oriental Institute is a research organization and museum devoted to the study of the ancient Near East. Founded in 1919 by James Henry Breasted, the Institute, a part of the University of Chicago, is an internationally recognized pioneer in the archaeology, philology, and history of early Near Eastern civilizations.

    • video
    Art and Decoration in Ancient Egypt

    Art and Decoration in Ancient Egypt

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Emily Teeter, manager of Special Exhibits at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, discusses the role Ancient Egyptian artifacts played in creating personal identities within society at the time. The lecture was given in conjunction with the museum's "Before the Pyramids: The Origins of Egyptian Civilization" exhibit, which featured artifacts from 4000 to 2600 B.C. Emily Teeter is also a research associate and curator at the Oriental Institute. She is the author of many scholarly and popular articles that have been published in journals worldwide, and has served as a consultant for the Seattle Art Museum and the Art Institute of Chicago. Teeter is widely traveled in the region, and has led tours to Egypt, Arabia, Turkey, Syria, and Tunisia.

    • 54 Min.
    • video
    Unraveling Mummy Mysteries

    Unraveling Mummy Mysteries

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Last month, the Art Institute of Chicago teamed up with radiologist Michael W. Vannier of the University of Chicago Medicine and Oriental Institute research associate Emily Teeter to study two of its mummies, Paankhenamun (c. 945–715 BC) and Wenuhotep (c. 300 BC). The team used state-of-the-art CT scan technology to examine the mummies, revealing new information about life in ancient Egypt.

    • 1 Min.
    Art and Decoration in Ancient Egypt (audio)

    Art and Decoration in Ancient Egypt (audio)

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Emily Teeter, manager of Special Exhibits at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, discusses the role Ancient Egyptian artifacts played in creating personal identities within society at the time. The lecture was given in conjunction with the museum's "Before the Pyramids: The Origins of Egyptian Civilization" exhibit, which featured artifacts from 4000 to 2600 B.C. Emily Teeter is also a research associate and curator at the Oriental Institute. She is the author of many scholarly and popular articles that have been published in journals worldwide, and has served as a consultant for the Seattle Art Museum and the Art Institute of Chicago. Teeter is widely traveled in the region, and has led tours to Egypt, Arabia, Turkey, Syria, and Tunisia.

    • 54 Min.
    Before the Pyramids: The Origins of Egyptian Civilization (audio)

    Before the Pyramids: The Origins of Egyptian Civilization (audio)

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Emily Teeter, Research Associate at the Oriental Institute and Curator of the "Before the Pyramids: The Origins of Egyptian Civilization" exhibit at the OI gave this talk to Oriental Institute Members during a special preview of the exhibit. The exhibit runs through December 31, 2011.

    For more about becoming a member of the OI visit: http://oi.uchicago.edu/getinvolved/

    This exhibit of artifacts from the Predynastic and Early Dynastic periods (ca. 4000-2685 BC), documents the birth of the most fundamental aspects of ancient Egyptian civilization — architecture, hieroglyphic writing, a belief in the afterlife, and allegiance to a semi-divine king — more than 1,000 years before the pyramids were built. Joining the 140 objects from the permanent collection of the Oriental Institute are the Battlefield Palette and a statue of the Second Dynasty king Khasekhem, two masterworks of Egyptian art from the Ashmolean Museum of Oxford University.

    • 40 Min.
    • video
    Before the Pyramids: The Origins of Egyptian Civilization

    Before the Pyramids: The Origins of Egyptian Civilization

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Emily Teeter, Research Associate at the Oriental Institute and Curator of the "Before the Pyramids: The Origins of Egyptian Civilization" exhibit at the OI gave this talk to Oriental Institute Members during a special preview of the exhibit. The exhibit runs through December 31, 2011.

    For more about becoming a member of the OI visit: http://oi.uchicago.edu/getinvolved/

    This exhibit of artifacts from the Predynastic and Early Dynastic periods (ca. 4000-2685 BC), documents the birth of the most fundamental aspects of ancient Egyptian civilization — architecture, hieroglyphic writing, a belief in the afterlife, and allegiance to a semi-divine king — more than 1,000 years before the pyramids were built. Joining the 140 objects from the permanent collection of the Oriental Institute are the Battlefield Palette and a statue of the Second Dynasty king Khasekhem, two masterworks of Egyptian art from the Ashmolean Museum of Oxford University.

    • 40 Min.
    Who Owns the Past (audio)

    Who Owns the Past (audio)

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    The Oriental Institute's special exhibit, Pioneers to the Past: American Archaeologists in the Middle East, 1919-1920, raised important questions about the links between past civilizations and modern nations, the antiquities trade, and the role museums play in preserving the past. "Who Owns the Past?" will bring together archaeologists and Chicago museum leaders to explore these issues in a conversation that will focus on ways archaeology, history, and heritage connect to today's political and cultural realities.

    "Who Owns the Past?" opens with Geoff Emberling, Chief Curator of the Oriental Institute Museum, who will discuss the issues the Pioneers to Past exhibit raises concerning previous attitudes towards antiquities and how they were obtained. A panel discussion follows, featuring:
    ⋅ James Cuno, President and Director of the Art Institute of Chicago. His recent book, Who Owns Antiquity?: Museums and the Battle over Our Ancient Heritage, has inspired impassioned discussion with his message that concern for antiquities should be dictated not by politics but by the demands of conservation and broad public access
    ⋅ Gil Stein, Director of the Oriental Institute and Professor of Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology, University of Chicago, is a committed proponent for building strong international legal frameworks to protect cultural heritage from looting and the illicit antiquities trade
    ⋅ Carlos Tortolero, President of Chicago's National Museum of Mexican Art, leads a cultural institution that forcefully advocates the return of major artifacts to their countries or origin.

    • 1 Std. 46 Min.

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