5 episodes

Have you ever wondered about all the history we’ve missed? The amazing figures that are seemingly forgotten, incredible events passed over, or what a picture of true world history actually looks like? Or how history played out in the eyes of those who lived it and made it? The A.D. History Podcast explores the last two thousand years of world history, in an innovative new way. Join hosts Paul K. DiCostanzo and Patrick Foote as they examine the past two millennia, beginning in 1 AD, progressing forward ten years every episode until they reach the modern day. Within each ten-year installment, Paul and Patrick aim to share incredibly important, but often overlooked historic events and figures from around the world in prospective fashion; trying to see history through the eyes and in the world of those who lived it. By identifying these sometimes lesser known, but in no way less significant aspects of history, A.D. History seeks to identify the many disparate threads that weave the fuller, richer tapestry of history from around the world.

A.D. History Podcast Paul K. DiCostanzo, Patrick Foote

    • History

Have you ever wondered about all the history we’ve missed? The amazing figures that are seemingly forgotten, incredible events passed over, or what a picture of true world history actually looks like? Or how history played out in the eyes of those who lived it and made it? The A.D. History Podcast explores the last two thousand years of world history, in an innovative new way. Join hosts Paul K. DiCostanzo and Patrick Foote as they examine the past two millennia, beginning in 1 AD, progressing forward ten years every episode until they reach the modern day. Within each ten-year installment, Paul and Patrick aim to share incredibly important, but often overlooked historic events and figures from around the world in prospective fashion; trying to see history through the eyes and in the world of those who lived it. By identifying these sometimes lesser known, but in no way less significant aspects of history, A.D. History seeks to identify the many disparate threads that weave the fuller, richer tapestry of history from around the world.

    Historical Jesus: What Do We Know? & Founding the Kushan Empire | 31AD – 40AD

    Historical Jesus: What Do We Know? & Founding the Kushan Empire | 31AD – 40AD

    In this most recent addition of A.D. History, Paul K. DiCostanzo and Patrick Foote dive into the study of historical Jesus regarding his adult life, public ministry and crucifixion. Paul and Patrick also break ground of the lesser known Kushan Empire, the Central Asian power that served as dual gatekeeper and buffer state for both the ancient Far East and West. 

    What do historians know about the life of Jesus of Nazareth?

    In the study of history, Jesus of Nazareth is a figure of great interest. Yet the study of his life through the historian’s lens is very different than that of a theologian or religious studies scholar, however none are mutually exclusive to the others – sharing some similarities. In this segment Paul and Patrick seek to explore various aspects of Jesus in regards to history, how he would have been viewed at that juncture, and where these events fit in the bigger picture. 



    Most credible scholars relating to the study about Jesus of Nazareth as a historical figure concur on a few key points regarding the events of his lifetime. Foremost, historians believe he was born under unknown circumstances between 1BC and 4AD. Moreover, Jesus was also a single figure, raised in the Jewish tradition, likely spoke in part several common languages used in 1st Century Roman Palestine such as ancient Aramaic. Additionally, Jesus had a well known movement via his public ministry lasting three years, between 28AD and 33AD. As well as that he was sentenced to death under Roman authority, and died by crucifixion on or near Passover in Jerusalem in his early 30’s.

    Historians aside from these aforementioned points enjoy far less certainty or consensus about Jesus of Nazareth’s life. Titus Flavius Josephus and Roman historian Tacitus serve as the best early, non-Christian sources making unambiguous and meaningful reference to Jesus’ life, his following during his life, and the growth of Christianity after his death. 

    Josephus, a former Roman slave and hellenized Jew, makes first mention of Jesus’ life and fate in his noted history of Judaism leading to the first century in Antiquities of the Jews, written in the mid 90’s AD.



    Tacitus in writing The Annals during the 120’s AD, also mentions Jesus in his recounting of Emperor Nero using Roman Christians as scapegoats, wrongly blaming and subsequently torturing them for the famous great fire of Rome in 64AD.

    Paul and Patrick also explore various archeological findings that might shed further light on figures mentioned in the Christian New Testament, such as the Roman governor of First Century Roman Palestine, Pontius Pilate. As well as Joseph ben Caiaphas, the head of the Sanhedrin – a body tasked with matters pertaining to governing the Jews on issues deemed within their scope of local autonomy. 



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    The World of Baby Jesus & Rise of Wang Mang | 1AD – 10AD



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    The Death of Wang Mang, Emperor Augustus and the Roman Republic | 11AD – 20AD



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    The Forgotten Declaration of Independence Signers Who Lost Everything for Signing







    Kushan Empire: The Gatekeeper for the Eastern and Western Worlds

    In the ancient world of this period and region, history is often dominated by the Roman and Han Chinese juggernauts. Yet these two powers never shared a common border, and their spheres of influence end in Central Asia. In a large portion of the significant territory separating them, one of the major rising powers was the Kushan Empire.

    The Kushan Empire, founded in approximately 30AD,

    • 1 hr 53 min
    Murder of Germanicus Cold Case & Strabo’s The Geography | 21AD – 30AD

    Murder of Germanicus Cold Case & Strabo’s The Geography | 21AD – 30AD

    In this newest installment of A.D. History, Paul K. DiCostanzo and Patrick Foote probe one of the most debated murder cold cases in history of the Roman living legend Germanicus. Paul and Patrick also examine the only known surviving such work of its time, Strabo’s much celebrated The Geography. The Geography in its detailed accounting provides a comprehensive work that not only outlines what the Greco-Roman sphere knew about the greater world, but also provides singular insight into how the Romans viewed their own place in that ancient world through Strabo’s eyes. 

    The Death of Germanicus: Murder Most Foul?

    Germanicus, the Roman soldier-statesman, stands as one of the most beloved and revered figures by ancient Romans. Born in 15 BC, Germanicus’ given name was likely Nero Claudius Drusus. Germanicus’ father was also called Nero Claudius Drusus; who himself was the adopted stepson of Emperor Augustus, as well as the elder brother to the Emperor Tiberius. Drusus and his death at a rather young age lead to Germanicus being adopted by Tiberius, in addition to being a most favored step-grandson to Augustus. 



    Germanicus due to his immense talent, battlefield achievements, and most unusual personal character for a Roman of his time or societal class, was thought by his fellow Romans as their Alexander the Great. Germanicus was indeed a legend in his own time; known not only for his stoicism, but his bravery, palpable loyalty, self effacement, lacking all pretensions, and his bold demeanor that unwaveringly lead from the front. His untimely demise in 19AD at age 34 in Syria is alleged to have been murder. Germanicus’ suspected murder, it’s most likely culprits, circumstances, purported means and lack of hard evidence has lead this to become an effective cold case now lasting over 2,000 years.

    The official Roman narrative implicating and convicting Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso, then governor of Roman Syria at the time of Germanicus’ alleged murder – namely by poison – is at best problematic. The cold case is wrought with innuendo, paranoia, wild accusations, and circumstantial evidence – which is no evidence at all. Indeed, conspiracy is remarkably difficult to prove in many modern western legal systems, and Piso’s conviction today could never come to pass based on the paltry evidence available. 

    Paul and Patrick breakdown this immense history, taking a much closer look at the suspects believed most likely by the Roman people of the time, using the famous Agatha Christie trope, “who dunnit?”

    Strabo’s The Geography: What did the Romans know about the greater world?

    The Geography, or the Geographica, by Greco-Roman historian Strabo is a 17 volume work that outlines the greater ancient world from a Greco-Roman perspective. Strabo’s work not only outlines the greater geographical knowledge of the known world in great detail, but categorically describes the various disparate people’s that inhabit it. The Geography is most unique because no other like work is known to have survived into modernity, unlike his other work Historical Sketches or Historica Hypomnemata.

    Strabo, the chronicler of this work, died in 24 AD at age 87. Strabo, son of a wealthy family, originally hailed from ancient Anatolia, in Amaseia Pontus under King Mithridates VI. Strabo’s family notably threw in their lot with the Romans, prior to Amaseia’s incorporation into the Roman Empire under Pompey in 70BC.



    The Geography and it’s vast importance to scholars of antiquity provides the most important insight of all, a first hand look into exactly how the Romans viewed themselves and their place in their world. For all intents and purposes, there is no greater historical windfall which surpasses gaining that contemporaneous understanding.

    • 1 hr 59 min
    The Death of Wang Mang, Augustus, and the Roman Republic | 11AD – 20AD

    The Death of Wang Mang, Augustus, and the Roman Republic | 11AD – 20AD

    In the rapid changing landscape of world history occurring in 11AD to 20AD, Paul K. DiCostanzo and Patrick Foote dive into the shocking rule and fall of Wang Mang’s Xin Dynasty, and give a closer look into the death throws of the Roman Republic under the rule of Augustus and rise of Tiberius.

    Xin Dynasty China: Socialism with Ancient Chinese Characteristics?

    Wang Mang in the second decade of the 1st century AD begins to enact his very unusual vision for China, in what appears in form as proto-socialism. Yet is that really what Wang creates?



    Wang during his short time in power turns an early feudal Chinese society on it’s head, showing an apparent deep ideological vision for life under his rule that historians still don’t fully understand.

    Wang’s time a top the ancient Chinese world proved a cautionary tale for many rulers, as Patrick paints the portrait of how this very unusual period imploded in very short order. 

    Caesar Augustus & the Roman Republic on it’s Death Bed

    The death of the Roman Republic is a long studied portion of history, for the purposes of how a seemingly democratic republic falls into one man dynastic rule.

    Caesar Augustus, also known as Octavian, is the model for every Roman Emperor that succeeds him to the fall of Rome itself. Augustus almost singlehanded made himself an independent force upon the Roman state.



    In gaining power, achieving one man rule slowly through the guise of republican constitutionality, creates Augustus’s dictatorial rule without offending Roman animosity for the concept of monarchy.





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    D-Day: What if the Allied Invasion of Normandy Failed?



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    The Forgotten Declaration of Independence Signers Who Lost Everything for Signing



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    How did Hitler Fool Stalin so Badly with the Invasion of the USSR? | WW2 Brain Bucket Reader Q&A







    Tiberius as the ultimate named successor assumes the role reluctantly, following Augustus’s marching orders to consolidate the empire to avoid yet another civil war. Yet, Tiberius’s story is a tragic one. As well as at times downright strange.

    Write to the A.D. History Podcast at adhistorypodcast@tgnreview.com

    Sources:



    * Beard, Mary. SPQR, 2015.

    * Frankopan, Peter. The Silk Roads, 2016.

    * Goldsworthy, Adrian Keith. Augustus: First Emperor of Rome. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2014.

    * Evans, Rhiannon & Smith, Matt. Emperors of Rome Podcast. Episodes 9, 10, 11. Latrobe University, 2014.

    • 1 hr 14 min
    The World of Baby Jesus & Rise of Wang Mang | 1AD -10AD

    The World of Baby Jesus & Rise of Wang Mang | 1AD -10AD

    world of 1AD to 10AD has its own very rich story to tell. In this initial episode of the A.D. History Podcast, co-hosts Paul K. DiCostanzo and Patrick Foote begin where AD – Anno Domini – itself begins, with the birth of the baby Jesus of Nazareth, best known as Jesus Christ. Episode 1 also goes farther afield, looking into China’s Han Dynasty, and the rise of the Machiavelli before Machiavelli – Wang Mang. 

    The World of Baby Jesus

    Paul paints a portrait of the very turbulent world baby Jesus was born into between 1BC and 4AD, expounding on the complex history that encompasses 1st Century Roman Palestine.



    Examining the perspective of both the Romans who ruled and the Jews who lived in 1st Century Roman Palestine, this first episode explores the historical seeds of so much of the conflict that will arise during Jesus’ public ministry three decades later. 

    The Rise of Wang Mang, Duke of Anham, & A Fractured Han Dynasty

    In the second segment, Patrick dives into the lesser known history of China’s Han Dynasty in the 1st Century AD. The Han Dynasty managed to rule for hundreds of years, but not continuously.

    Through the power play machinations of the nobleman Wang Mang, Duke of Anhan, Wang laid the framework for his very own house of cards.



    Monarchy and Dynasty are a far more delicate institution than they often appear. For a Han Dynasty with its emperors continually dying young and childless, Wang Mang found his unique opening.

    His story is a classic tale of methodically accumulating power, how its exercised when acquired, and how it effects those who finally attain it.





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    Introducing the A.D. History Podcast



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    D-Day in Perspective: What if the Allied Invasion of Normandy Failed?



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    “Name Explain”: How YouTube’s Patrick Foote Made Etymology Cool Again









    Anna Domini is voiced by Anna Chloe Moorey.

    Sources:



    * Beard, Mary. SPQR, 2015.

    * Frankopan, Peter. The Silk Roads, 2016.

    * Von Wahlde, Urban C., Gnosticism, Docetism, and the Judaisms of the First Century: The Search for the Wider Context of the Johannine Literature and Why It Matters (The Library of New Testament Studies), 2016

    * Kotkin, Stephen. Stalin, 2014.

    * Kotkin, Stephen. Stalin, Vol. II, 2017.

    * Montefiore, Simon, Sebag, Jerusalem, 2011.

    * “Hyper History, MANG WANG 45BC – AD 23 Chinese Statesman”, n.d.

    * https://www.hyperhistory.com/online_n2/people_n2/ppersons2_n2/wangmang.html.

    * Theobald, Ulrich. “Wang Mang 王莽 and the Xin Dynasty 新 (8-23 CE)”, n.d.

    * http://www.chinaknowledge.de/History/Han/personswangmang.html.

    * Bielenstein, Hans, H.A. “Wang Mang EMPEROR OF XIN DYNASTY”, n.d. https://www.britannica.com/biography/Wang-Mang.

    * Dash, Mike. “Emperor Wang Mang: China’s First Socialist?”, n.d. https://www.smithsonianmag.

    • 1 hr 4 min
    Introducing the A.D. History Podcast

    Introducing the A.D. History Podcast

    New York City, NY/London, England UK – Have you ever wondered about all the history you’ve missed? The amazing figures that are seemingly forgotten, incredible events passed over, or what a picture of true world history actually looks like? Or how history played out in the eyes of those who lived it and made it? The A.D. History Podcast explores the last two thousand years of world history, in an innovative new way. Co-hosts Paul K. DiCostanzo and Patrick Foote examine the past two millennia, beginning in 1 AD, progressing forward chronologically ten years every episode until reaching the modern day.

    Within each ten-year installment, the A.D. History Podcast aims to share incredibly important, but often overlooked historic events and figures from around the world in a prospective fashion; trying to see history through the eyes and in the world of those who lived it. By identifying these sometimes lesser known, but in no way less significant aspects of history, the A.D. History Podcast seeks to identify the many disparate threads that weave the fuller, richer tapestry of history from around the world.

    What is the A.D. History Podcast?

    In partnership with TGNR, Patrick Foote, creator of the popular YouTube Channel Name Explain, and TGNR Managing Editor Paul K. DiCostanzo are launching the new A.D. History Podcast. The show is a monthly, 60 minute, two segment program examining the last 2000 years of world history in detail, decade-by-decade beginning in 1AD.

    “With all the amazing history podcasts in production today, none have attempted to explore history in this large a scope of time, while also doing so at this close of range; providing an unprecedented level of detail from that long ago,” said Paul K. DiCostanzo, A.D. History Podcast co-host. “The A.D. History Podcast is a very ambitious undertaking, seeking to uncover the fascinating, but mostly overlooked details of our past which are virtually unknown to a modern audience – despite their importance. Especially doing so with a strong emphasis on historical context, and exploring it through the perspective of the figures who experienced it.” Beyond exploring history in this new fashion, the show seeks to connect to their audience through an incredible avenue enjoying exponential growth. 

    A.D. History Podcast: Exploring History Through a Growing Medium

    Podcasting is by far one of the most popular platforms for audiences to engage with their content of choice, and the A.D. History Podcast looks to tell it’s story through this dynamic platform. Patrick Foote, a very notable creator of original educational content see’s first hand how people are now seeking new information:

    “I feel newer media outlets like podcasts and YouTube are allowing new kinds of content that simply wouldn’t be able to exist before the advent of the world wide web. Take my channel Name Explain, I don’t think it would be able to exist as a 30 minute television show or anything like that. In recent years, ‘Edutainment’ content has seen a huge boom on these platforms, and thanks to it people are learning new things in ways they really never have done before. With A.D. History, we hope to attract more people to not just snippets of history, but to give them a complete understanding of how the world was shaped and changed over the last 2000 plus years. An epic retelling of our own history!”

    Messrs. DiCostanzo and Foote see the A.D. History Podcast, and podcasting in general, as an ideal forum for their deep dive into history, and reaching likeminded listeners in their new journey.

    Yet it is important to understand who Patrick Foote and Paul DiCostanzo are, and just how they arrived at their new undertaking of this new show.





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    • 52 sec

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