4 episodes

A Podcast about Anti-Doping Science Research by a PhD Student. How do we scientifically prove there are banned substances inside an athletes body? How do we catch drug cheats and fight doping in sport?

Anti-Doping Science Podcast Anti-Doping Science Podcast

    • Sports
    • 5.0 • 1 Rating

A Podcast about Anti-Doping Science Research by a PhD Student. How do we scientifically prove there are banned substances inside an athletes body? How do we catch drug cheats and fight doping in sport?

    Ep.36 - Is Jon Jones Storing Long Term Metabolites of Turinabol in his Fat Cells?

    Ep.36 - Is Jon Jones Storing Long Term Metabolites of Turinabol in his Fat Cells?

    In this episode I further discuss the Jon Jones case, in particular I concentration on the ideas behind the pulsatile excretion of the long-term metabolite of Turinabol (M3) and the idea that this can be stored in fat and released when an athlete cuts weight.
    Make sure you like, subscribe, share and follow me on Instagram (@antidopingscience)

    Research Links:
    Discovery of the M3 metabolite in 2012 by Sobolevsky & Rodchenkov: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22142641

    Critique of this research: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/305489931_Novel_metabolites_of_turinabol_WADA_moving_toward_illusions

    The 2018 research on the M3 metabolite:
    https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2018/ob/c8ob00122g#!divAbstract
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29570240

    Research on the pulsatile excretion of Clomiphene in 2018:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30295816

    The proposed WADA research on Long Term Metabolites:
    https://www.wada-ama.org/en/resources/research/controlled-administration-trial-of-oral-turinabol-metabolite-confirmation-and

    Profile of Turinabol:
    https://anabolic.org/oral-turinabol/

    Profile of Mibolerone:
    https://anabolic.org/cheque-drops-mibolerone/

    • 26 min
    Ep.35 - Jon Jones & The Long Term Metabolite for Turinabol

    Ep.35 - Jon Jones & The Long Term Metabolite for Turinabol

    Earlier this week it was announced that Jon Jones’s urine produced an Adverse Analytical Finding (AAF) for a long-term metabolite for the Anabolic Androgenic Steroid (AAS) Chlorodehydromethyltestosterone (DHCMT) – which is known by it’s trade name Oral-Turinabol. This is the 2nd time this long-term metabolite has been discovered inside Jon Jones urine. This podcast covers a detailed discussion on Jon Jones’s previous anti-doping rule violation for Clomiphene, his 2nd antidoping rule violation for the M3 metabolite and a discussion of the reappearance of this metabolite in his urine. I also discuss the research that has been conducted so far on the long-term metabolite (M3 metabolite) of Turinabol. Links to all reference material is below:

    Article on Jon Jones Fighting History: https://mmajunkie.com/2018/12/ufc-232-preview-jon-jones-career-statistics-facts

    Article on Atypical Finding announced in December 2018: https://mmajunkie.com/2018/12/jon-jones-drug-test-atypical-result-ufc-232-moved-to-los-angeles-gustafsson-dana-white

    Article on Jones’s 1st AAF for Clomiphene: http://www.espn.com/mma/story/_/id/25608180/jon-jones-long-winding-road-ufc-232

    Article on Clomiphene https://anabolic.org/clomid-clomiphene-citrate/
    USADA High Risk List of Supplements & Supplement 411: https://www.usada.org/substances/supplement-411/

    USADA Arbitration Report on 2nd AAF for M3 Metabolite for Turinabol: https://ufc.usada.org/wp-content/uploads/Final-Redacted-Award-Jones-and-USADA.pdf

    Discovery of the M3 metabolite in 2012 by Sobolevsky & Rodchenkov: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22142641

    Critique of Sobolevsky & Rodchenkov’s research: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/305489931_Novel_metabolites_of_turinabol_WADA_moving_toward_illusions

    Synthesis of the M3 metabolite in 2018 (also discussing the extension in detection from the long term metabolite): https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2018/ob/c8ob00122g#!divAbstract

    Confirmation of the M3 metabolite in 2018: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29570240

    • 54 min
    Ep.34 Why are Drugs in Sport banned? Part 2

    Ep.34 Why are Drugs in Sport banned? Part 2

    In Part 1 we discussed the main arguments as to why we should ban drugs in sports - it is worth noting that the World Anti-Doping Agency has 3 criterion for placing a drug on the prohibited list
    1) the drug will negatively impact athletes health
    2) the drug is performance enhancing
    3) the drug goes against the "spirit of sport"

    In Part 2 I read a paper entitled "A Moral Foundation for Anti-Doping: How Far Have We Progressed? Where Are the Limits?" by Thomas Murray. In this paper Murray further dissects the above three points (and particularly the idea of the "spirit of sport"). He believes that the spirit of sport (defined as "the pursuit of human excellence through the dedicated perfection of each person's natural talents") is much what draws people to watch sport. He believes the essential question for the future of sport is what values of meanings do we seek in and through sport - because if it is the above definition then drugs certainty should never be allowed.

    Make sure you are following me on Instagram (@antidopingscience) and you subscribe and share this podcast!

    • 32 min
    Ep.33 Why are Drugs in Sport banned? Part 1

    Ep.33 Why are Drugs in Sport banned? Part 1

    Why is it that as a society we decide to ban drugs in the majority of sports?
    In a paper entitled "Performance enhancement and drug control in sport: ethical considerations" published in 2007 Dennis Hemphill suggests there are a number of conventional arguments that are used to support drug bans in sport:
    1) Sport should be the testing of natural abilities
    2) If drugs are banned it is unfair for athletes to use them, when others are drug free to maintain a "level playing field"
    3) Drugs poses significant short or long term health hazards
    4) An athlete using drugs can be thought to "coerce" others to have to take drugs out of fear of being less competitive - this argument is often used that if all elite athletes used drugs it would force young impressionable adults to use drugs.

    Hemphill also plays the devils advocate and describes philosophical flaws in each of the above arguments. For example:
    1) There are many things that athletes do for sport that is unnatural (e.g. training at very high altitude, using equipment/technology that aids in sporting success etc)
    2) A "level playing field" doesn't exist in sports in many different areas outside of drugs - there is uneven access to funding in different countries, access to training facilities, world-class coaching etc
    3) Elite athletes push their bodies to the limit and their training regimens are probably not "healthy"
    4) Young athletes may feel "coerced" to conduct unhealthy training practices, or nutritional practices that elite athletes use, yet there is no policing of this kind of information sharing.

    Part 1 will further discuss the above points and concludes that even given the above philosophical flaws in some of these mainstream arguments there is still a "pervasive disapproval" of drugs in sport - simply even if you can argue against some of these mainstream arguments society as a whole still seems something different about drugs in sport and as a majority doesn't allow them.

    Make sure you are following me on Instagram (@antidopingscience) and please share this podcast if you find it informative!

    • 18 min

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