6 episodes

You are listening to Appalachian Words, the show about language in Appalachia and the Great Smoky Mountains. I’m your host, Jennifer Heinmiller. I am co-author of the Dictionary of and Smoky Mountain and Southern Appalachian English, a historical dictionary that is over 1.3 million words long and covers everything from ain’t to zonies alive. If you’re curious about that one, subscribe and tune in.

I welcome your questions, comments, stories, suggestions, and zucchini bread. Contact me at appalachian.dictionary@gmail.com

Appalachian Words Jennifer Heinmiller

    • Society & Culture

You are listening to Appalachian Words, the show about language in Appalachia and the Great Smoky Mountains. I’m your host, Jennifer Heinmiller. I am co-author of the Dictionary of and Smoky Mountain and Southern Appalachian English, a historical dictionary that is over 1.3 million words long and covers everything from ain’t to zonies alive. If you’re curious about that one, subscribe and tune in.

I welcome your questions, comments, stories, suggestions, and zucchini bread. Contact me at appalachian.dictionary@gmail.com

    #7 Haint Tales

    #7 Haint Tales

    Welcome to Episode 7! This time I'm talking about ghost stories and spooky happenings in the mountains.
    Contact me at appalachian.dictionary@gmail.com  

    If you would like to contribute to the publication of the Dictionary of Smoky Mountain and Southern Appalachian English, contact the University of North Carolina Press:  https://uncpress.org/contact/

    Ghosts Along the Cumberland https://www.amazon.com/Ghosts-Along-C...

    Foxfire books https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/se...


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    • 24 min
    #6 Decorations and Funeralizing

    #6 Decorations and Funeralizing

    Welcome to Episode 6! In this episode I talk about the traditions of Decoration Day and funeral practices in Appalachia. 

    Contact me at appalachian.dictionary@gmail.com

    If you would like to contribute to the publication of the Dictionary of Smoky Mountain and Southern Appalachian English, contact the University of North Carolina Press: 

    https://uncpress.org/contact/

    Interesting books to check out from your bookstore or local library:

    https://uncpress.org/book/9780807833971/decoration-day-in-the-mountains/

    https://uncpress.org/book/9780807843284/cabins-in-the-laurel/

    https://utpress.utexas.edu/books/comfol

    https://www.amazon.com/Museum-Appalachia-story-nationally-acclaimed/dp/0887401023


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    • 27 min
    #5: Killing Shakespeare

    #5: Killing Shakespeare

    Welcome to Appalachian Words, the show about language in Appalachia and the Great Smoky Mountains. 

    I’m your host, Jennifer Heinmiller. I am co-author of the Dictionary of and Smoky Mountain and Southern Appalachian English, a historical dictionary that is over 1.3 million words long and covers everything from ain’t to zonies alive.  

    Drop me a line at appalachian.dictionary@gmail.com  

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    afeard (also afeared, afeered, afyered, feard, feared, feered) predicate adjective Afraid. 

    [Editor’s note: Joseph Hall found that in the Smoky Mountains in the late 1930s afeard was the form universally used in preference to afraid.] 

    1845 (in 1974 Harris High Times 47) She hugged me mity tite she was “so feered of fallin off that drated poney.”  1847 (in 1870 Drake Pioneer Life KY 82) I was ever afterward “afeard” of wild and wicked horses.  1859 Taliaferro Fisher’s River 209 I’m afeered you’ll fall from grace ef you shout too soon, Sol.  1863 Hill CW Letters (Jan 1) I am all most feard to send [the money] in a letter.  1875 King Great South 536 He volunteered to direct us to the falls, though he “was powerful afeard of snakes.  1913 Kephart Our Sthn High 288 When the mountaineer boy challenges his mate: “I dar ye—I ain’t afeared!” his verb and participle are of the same ancient and sterling rank [as Chaucer and Layamon].  1924 Raine Saddlebags 97-98 Afeared is more logical than afraid, and was preferred by Lady MacBeth.  1929 Chapman Speech Sthn Highlands 619 “I am afeard” is quite as good English as “I am afraid.” Better, in fact—afeard being the regular participle of the verb “affear,” and “afraid” the very irregular participle of “affray,” an inexplicable variant of “affright.”  1937 Hall Coll (Cades Cove TN) I’m afeared of them copperheads.  Ibid. (Kirklands Creek NC) I ain’t nary bit afeared of him.  1938 Bowman High Horizons 46 Nearly all of the older people use the Elizabethan “afeared” while the children usually say “afraid,” I have noticed.  1941 Hall Coll (Cataloochee NC) Pretty nearly all these old people say “afeared.”  1956 Hall Coll (Cades Cove TN) My mother heared them old witch tales. She was afeared she’d see a witch.  1967 Hall Coll (Townsend TN) My daddy wasn’t afeared of them hogs. Hit come up and hit stood right on his breast, looking right down on his face.  1978 Montgomery White Pine Coll I-3 They’d been feared of them.  1989 Smith Flyin’ Bullets 244 That Charles had a lot of nerve, he wasn’t afeared of them in the least bit.  2005 Williams Gratitude 476 afyered.  [ultimately  Old English afæred, past participle of afæran; OED3 afeard past-part/adj obsolete or dialect c1000; EDD afeard adj in general dialect use in Scot, Irel, Engl; SND afeard/afeart rare since 1700; CUD afeard (also afeart); Web3 afeard adj now dialect; DARE afear(e)d adj once widespread, now chiefly South, Midland]


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    • 22 min
    #2 Shindig

    #2 Shindig

    You are listening to Appalachian Words, the show about language in Appalachia and the Great Smoky Mountains. I’m your host, Jennifer Heinmiller. I am co-author of the Dictionary of and Smoky Mountain and Southern Appalachian English, a historical dictionary that is over 1.3 million words long and covers everything from ain’t to zonies alive. If you’re curious about that one, subscribe and tune in.

    I welcome your questions, comments, stories, suggestions, and zucchini bread. You can contact me at: appalachian.dictionary@gmail.com


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    • 11 min
    #3 Apple everything!

    #3 Apple everything!

    You are listening to Appalachian Words, the show about language in Appalachia and the Great Smoky Mountains. I’m your host, Jennifer Heinmiller. I am co-author of the Dictionary of and Smoky Mountain and Southern Appalachian English, a historical dictionary that is over 1.3 million words long and covers everything from ain’t to zonies alive. If you’re curious about that one, subscribe and tune in.

    I welcome your questions, comments, stories, suggestions, and zucchini bread. You can contact me at: appalachian.dictionary@gmail.com


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    • 21 min
    #4 School Days

    #4 School Days

    You are listening to Appalachian Words, the show about language in Appalachia and the Great Smoky Mountains. I’m your host, Jennifer Heinmiller. I am co-author of the Dictionary of and Smoky Mountain and Southern Appalachian English, a historical dictionary that is over 1.3 million words long and covers everything from ain’t to zonies alive. If you’re curious about that one, subscribe and tune in.

    I welcome your questions, comments, stories, suggestions, and zucchini bread. You can contact me at: appalachian.dictionary@gmail.com




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    • 34 min

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