56 episodes

FreeCircle Freedoms is a podcast that covers my thoughts and opinions on freedom, the direction of our nation and the world.
The shows Season 2 will release each week on Sunday starting in January 2020
Please feel free to send us a message. We play messages on the next podcast. Find all of our great Podcasts on Our website:
Dead America
https://www.deadamerica.website
Social media: We are mainly on Twitter, So lovers find us @freecircle3
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And all of our great Podcasts!

FreeCircle Freedoms Ed Watters

    • Self Help

FreeCircle Freedoms is a podcast that covers my thoughts and opinions on freedom, the direction of our nation and the world.
The shows Season 2 will release each week on Sunday starting in January 2020
Please feel free to send us a message. We play messages on the next podcast. Find all of our great Podcasts on Our website:
Dead America
https://www.deadamerica.website
Social media: We are mainly on Twitter, So lovers find us @freecircle3
We are STRONGER as ONE! Support this podcast:
And all of our great Podcasts!

    Party Principles and alignments

    Party Principles and alignments

    https://www.deadamerica.website

    https://history.house.gov/Exhibitions-and-Publications/BAIC/Historical-Essays/Keeping-the-Faith/Party-Realignment--New-Deal/ (https://history.house.gov/Exhibitions-and-Publications/BAIC/Historical-Essays/Keeping-the-Faith/Party-Realignment--New-Deal/)

    Indeed, the most common political experience African-American Members of this era shared was their involvement in politics at the ward and precinct levels. The Chicago political machines run by Thompson and, later, Democrats such as Edward J. Kelly and Richard J. Daley, sent nearly one-third of the black Members of this era to Capitol Hill. Local and regional political machines recognized the voting power of the growing African-American urban population long before the national parties realized its potential. At the beginning of this era, the relationship between black politicians and party bosses was strong, and many black Members of Congress placed party loyalty above all else. But by the late 1960s, as black politicians began to assemble their own power bases, carving out a measure of independence, they often challenged the machine when party interests conflicted with issues important to the black community. Unlike earlier black Members who relied on the established political machines to launch their careers, these Members, most of whom had grown up in the cities they represented, managed to forge political bases separate from the dominant party structure. By linking familial and community connections with widespread civic engagement, they routinely clashed with the entrenched political powers.

    • 10 min
    Parties and elections in american history

    Parties and elections in american history

    https://www.deadamerica.website

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Political_parties_in_the_United_States (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Political_parties_in_the_United_States)

    The United States Constitution is silent on the subject of political parties. The Founding Fathers did not originally intend for American politics to be partisan. In Federalist Papers No. 9 and No. 10, Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, respectively, wrote specifically about the dangers of domestic political factions. In addition, the first President of the United States, George Washington, was not a member of any political party at the time of his election or throughout his tenure as president. Furthermore, he hoped that political parties would not be formed, fearing conflict and stagnation, as outlined in his Farewell Address.

    Nevertheless, the beginnings of the American two-party system emerged from his immediate circle of advisers. Hamilton and Madison, who wrote the aforementioned Federalist Papers against political factions, ended up being the core leaders in this emerging party system. It was the split camps of Federalists, given rise with Hamilton as a leader, and Democratic-Republicans, with Madison and Thomas Jefferson at the helm of this political faction, that created the environment in which partisanship, once distasteful, came to being.

    • 8 min
    The party system in congress

    The party system in congress

    https://www.deadamerica.website

    https://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/elections/political-parties.html (https://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/elections/political-parties.html)

    http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=lled&fileName=005/lled005.db&recNum=166 (http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=lled&fileName=005/lled005.db&recNum=166)

    Political PartiesDixiecrat's, Know-Nothings, Free-Soil, Prohibition: These are but a few of the many political parties that have played a role in American presidential elections. The diverse conditions of historical eras, and differing ideologies of America's people, gave rise to various political parties, founded to advance specific ideals and the candidates who represented them.

    Today, America is a multi-party system. The Democratic Party and the Republican Party are the most powerful. Yet other parties, such as the Reform, Libertarian, Socialist, Natural Law, Constitution, and Green Parties can promote candidates in a presidential election. It is likely that political parties will continue to play a major role in presidential elections. Do you think our party system has strengthened or weakened our election process? Do you think the American people will seriously look outside the Republican and Democratic Parties to elect a president some day? What might cause this?

    • 48 min
    Functions of a political party

    Functions of a political party

    Find all we do at: https://www.deadamerica.website

    https://uk.usembassy.gov/role-political-parties/ (https://uk.usembassy.gov/role-political-parties/)

    When the Founders of the American Republic drafted and ratified the U.S. Constitution, they did not envision a role for political parties. Indeed, they sought through various constitutional arrangements — such as separation of powers among the executive, legislative and judicial branches; federalism; and indirect election of the president by an Electoral College (see below) — to insulate the new republic from parties and factions.

    In spite of the Founders’ intentions, the United States in 1800 became the first nation to develop nascent political parties organized on a national basis to accomplish the transfer of executive power from one faction to another via an election. The development and expansion of political parties that followed was closely linked to the broadening of voting rights. In the early days of the republic, only male property owners could vote, but that restriction began to erode in the early 19th century as the result of immigration, the growth of cities and other democratizing forces, such as the westward expansion of the country. Over the decades, the right to vote was extended to ever larger numbers of the adult population as restrictions based on property ownership, race and sex were eliminated. As the electorate expanded, the political parties evolved to mobilize the growing mass of voters as the means of political control. Political parties became institutionalized to accomplish this essential task. Thus, parties in America emerged as a part of democratic expansion, and, beginning in the 1830s, they became firmly established and powerful.

    Today, the Republican and Democratic parties — both of them heirs to predecessor parties from the 18th and 19th centuries — dominate the political process. With rare exceptions, the two major parties control the presidency, the Congress, the d the state legislatures. For instance, every president since 1852 has been either a Republican or a Democrat, and in the post-World War II era, the two major parties’ share of the popular vote for president has averaged close to 95 percent. Rarely do any of the 50 states elect a governor who is not a Democrat or a Republican. The number of independent or third-party members of Congress or of state legislatures is extremely low.

    In recent decades, increasing numbers of individual voters classify themselves as “independent,” and they are permitted to register to vote as such in many states. Yet, according to opinion polls, even those who say that they are independents normally have partisan leanings toward one party or another.

    An exception to this general rule can be found at the local level, particularly in small cities and towns where candidates may not be required to declare any party affiliation or may run as part of a slate of like-minded office-seekers under the banner of a particular local initiative — such as downtown redevelopment or school construction.

    Although the two major parties organize and dominate the government at the national, state, and local levels, they tend to be less ideologically cohesive and programmatic than parties in many democracies. The ability of the major parties to adapt to the nation’s political development has resulted in a pragmatic domination of the political process.

    • 15 min
    Thank you for a great 2019

    Thank you for a great 2019

    Just to say thank you!

    https://www.deadamerica.website (https://www.deadamerica.website)

    • 1 min
    Join us at www.deadamerica.website

    Join us at www.deadamerica.website

    Thanks

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    • 4 min

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