24 episodes

A podcast series about the people, the places, the music, the drama and the gossip that is connected to the maiden performance of Handel's Messiah in Dublin in 1742. www.handelsmessiah.eu. Danish version www.handelmessiah.dk

Handel's Messiah - the advent calendar Katrine Nyland Sorensen

    • Music History
    • 5.0, 1 Rating

A podcast series about the people, the places, the music, the drama and the gossip that is connected to the maiden performance of Handel's Messiah in Dublin in 1742. www.handelsmessiah.eu. Danish version www.handelmessiah.dk

    #24 Handel's Messiah

    #24 Handel's Messiah

    'Amen': When Susannah Cibber had sung her aria “He was despised” at the premiere of Messiah, Dr. Patrick Delany was so deeply moved that he spontaneously exclaimed: "Woman, for this, be all thy sins forgiven." On 13 August 1742 Faulkner’s Dublin Journal could inform its readers that ‘the celebrated Mr Handel, so famous for his excellent compositions and fine performance, with which he has entertained this city in the most pleasant way, has now travelled back to England’.

    For a long time Handel was planning to return to the city that had restored his faith in his own excellence as a composer AND had improved his financial situation quite substantially. However, he did never return.
    Music: Dunedin Consort ‘Handel’s Original Dublin Version 1742’

    • 6 min
    #23 Handel's Messiah

    #23 Handel's Messiah

    'The finest Composition of Music that was ever heard': Following the reactions of the only full rehearsal of Messiah on the 9th of April, the expectations were soaring. The date of the premiere had to be changed to the 13th of April. There was no doubt, Dublin high society didn’t want to miss such an important event. Faulkner’s Dublin Journal even had to print this request: “Many Ladies and Gentlemen who are well-wishers to this Noble and Grand Charity, for which this Oratorio was composed, request it as a Favour, that the Ladies who honour this performance with their Presence, would be pleased to come without Hoops, as it will greatly increase the Charity, by making Room for more company.”
    Music: Dunedin Consort ‘Handel’s Original Dublin Version 1742’

    • 5 min
    #22 Handel's Messiah

    #22 Handel's Messiah

    Grand Messiah: Many people will think that the very first Messiah doesn't sound "right" as the oratorio has since come to be associated with gigantic performances. In the British Victorian era in particular Messiah could not get too big. In June 1859 nearly 82,000 people would have listened to 2,765 choir singers and 460 musicians performing Messiah. But as George Bernard Shaw wrote in 1891, As he wrote: ''IF I were a member of the House of Commons,'' George Bernard Shaw wrote, ''I would propose a law making it a capital offense to perform an oratorio by Handel with more than 80 performers in the chorus and orchestra.''
    Music: Dunedin Consort ‘Handel’s Original Dublin Version 1742’

    • 5 min
    #21 Handel's Messiah

    #21 Handel's Messiah

    Little Messiah: Naturally, we do not know how the very first performance of Messiah sounded. Particularly because Handel in his own life-time managed to make numerous changes in connection with later performances, so that there are now at least ten different versions from Handel’s own time. But one thing is for certain. Messiah sounded very different than in the later versions that had hundreds of musicians and hundreds of choir singers.
    Music: Dunedin Consort ‘Handel’s Original Dublin Version 1742’

    • 5 min
    #20 Handel's Messiah

    #20 Handel's Messiah

    Mrs. Delaney, the good friend: Another woman who played an important role in Handel’s life was Mary Delaney or Mary Pendarves. The reason for calling attention to her in this advent calendar is that she had been trying to convince Handel for a long time that if he would only go to Dublin, everything was going to be alright. And she spoke from experience. For both Handel, Cibber and Mary Pendarves Dublin became the city of fresh starts.
    Music: Dunedin Consort ‘Handel’s Original Dublin Version 1742’

    • 7 min
    #19 Handel's Messiah

    #19 Handel's Messiah

    Recipe for ragout with poor Irish children: The mighty dean and writer, Jonathan Swift was close to putting a stop to the premiere of Messiah. Under no circumstances would he let his choir singers perform in a ‘fiddle players’ club in Fishamble Street’. One would have thought that Jonathan Swift in particular would appreciate a concert that was to raise money for the release of imprisoned debtors who were starving. Because Jonathan Swift himself had previously highlighted the shocking poverty in which the majority of Catholics in the country were living with his pamflet, ‘A Modest Proposal For Preventing the Children of Poor People in Ireland from Being a Burden to Their Parents or the Country, and for Making Them Beneficial to the Public.´
    Music: Dunedin Consort ‘Handel’s Original Dublin Version 1742’

    • 7 min

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