40 episodes

Scholars and witnesses present evidence documenting the mass atrocities that took place from 1933 through to the end of World War II in 1945, giving voice to the memories of the 6 million Jews and 5 million other victims who were murdered throughout Nazi Germany and German-occupied territories under the command of Adolf Hitler.

Holocaust (Video) UCTV

    • Society & Culture

Scholars and witnesses present evidence documenting the mass atrocities that took place from 1933 through to the end of World War II in 1945, giving voice to the memories of the 6 million Jews and 5 million other victims who were murdered throughout Nazi Germany and German-occupied territories under the command of Adolf Hitler.

    • video
    Racism in German and American Cinema of the Twenties: From The Ancient Law to The Jazz Singer with Charles Musser - Holocaust Living History Workshop

    Racism in German and American Cinema of the Twenties: From The Ancient Law to The Jazz Singer with Charles Musser - Holocaust Living History Workshop

    Yale University professor and filmmaker Charles Musser explores the historical and contemporary perspectives of race relations in German and American cinema from the 1920s by examining The Ancient Law (1923) and The Jazz Singer (1927). He evaluates how each film addresses anti-Semitism as well as the burning question of the history of blackface as a theatrical convention. Series: "Library Channel" [Show ID: 35016]

    • 1 hr 15 min
    • video
    Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil with Susan Neiman - Holocaust Living History Workshop

    Learning from the Germans: Race and the Memory of Evil with Susan Neiman - Holocaust Living History Workshop

    As an increasingly polarized America fights over the legacy of racism, Susan Neiman, author of the contemporary philosophical classic Evil in Modern Thought, asks what we can learn from the Germans about confronting the evils of the past. In the wake of white nationalist attacks, the ongoing debate over reparations, and the controversy surrounding Confederate monuments and the contested memories they evoke, Susan Neiman’s Learning from the Germans delivers an urgently needed perspective on how a country can come to terms with its historical wrongdoings. She combines philosophical reflection, personal stories, and interviews with both Americans and Germans who are grappling with the evils of their own national histories. Series: "Writers" [Show ID: 35015]

    • 54 min
    • video
    Shoah: Four Sisters

    Shoah: Four Sisters

    Archivist Regina Longo (Brown University) joins UCSB’s Harold Marcuse (Department of History) for a discussion of Claude Lanzmann’s final film Shoah: Four Sisters (2018), a four-part miniseries that was screened over two days at the Pollock Theater. Longo’s work includes extensive restoration of Claude Lanzmann’s landmark documentary footage of testimonials from the Holocaust, and in conversation with Marcuse she offers deeper insight into the history of the film and the women it concerns. Longo explains how Lanzmann’s Shoah was initially funded and produced, how hundreds of hours of footage is being carefully restored from original prints and made available online, and how Four Sisters both influences and is situated in a legacy of film, legal testimony, memoir, and other post-war efforts to represent the un-representable horror of the Shoah. Series: "Carsey-Wolf Center" [Humanities] [Show ID: 34842]

    • 43 min
    • video
    When Biology Became Destiny: How Historians Interpret Gender in the Holocaust - Holocaust Living History Workshop

    When Biology Became Destiny: How Historians Interpret Gender in the Holocaust - Holocaust Living History Workshop

    Despite the explosive growth of Holocaust studies, scholars of Nazi Germany and the Shoah long neglected gender as an analytical category. It wasn’t until 1984 when the essay collection When Biology Became Destiny: Women in Weimar and Nazi Germany raised awareness of women’s experiences under fascism. It explored women’s double jeopardy as females and as Jews. In this lecture, Marion Kaplan, one of the editors the publication, takes the audience on a historical tour of her research, from the first workshops raising questions to the first publications providing answers. Since then, the gender perspective has provided significant insight into our understanding of Jewish life in Nazi Germany and during the Holocaust. Kaplan concludes her talk with a forward look at new areas of research that highlight women’s and gender studies. Series: "Library Channel" [Humanities] [Show ID: 34018]

    • 45 min
    • video
    Inventing Genocide - The Contingent Origins of a Concept During World War II - Holocaust Living History Workshop

    Inventing Genocide - The Contingent Origins of a Concept During World War II - Holocaust Living History Workshop

    The suite of international conventions and declarations about genocide, human rights, and refugees after the WWII is known as the “human rights revolution.” It is regarded as humanizing international affairs by implementing the lessons of the Holocaust. In this presentation, D**k Moses, Professor of Modern History at the University of Sydney, questions this rosy picture by investigating how persecuted peoples have invoked the Holocaust and made analogies with Jews to gain recognition as genocide victims. Such attempts rarely succeed and have been roundly condemned as cheapening the Holocaust memory, but how and why does genocide recognition require groups to draw such comparisons? Does the human rights revolution and image of the Holocaust as the paradigmatic genocide humanize postwar international affairs as commonly supposed? Series: "Library Channel" [Humanities] [Show ID: 34019]

    • 1 hr 16 min
    • video
    Against All Odds: Born in Mauthausen with Eva Clarke -- Holocaust Living History Workshop -- The Library Channel

    Against All Odds: Born in Mauthausen with Eva Clarke -- Holocaust Living History Workshop -- The Library Channel

    What does it mean to be born in a concentration camp, arguably one of the most inhospitable places on earth? Eva Clarke was one of three “miracle babies” who saw the light of day in KZ Mauthausen in Austria. Nine days after her birth, the Second World War ended. As a newborn, Eva’s chances of survival were extremely slim; against all odds, she lived, making her and her mother Anka the only survivors of their extended family. In 1948, they emigrated from Prague to the UK and settled in Cardiff, Wales. Eva regularly addresses audiences, and her remarkable story has been featured in the British and American media. She and her mother are among the protagonists of Wendy Holden’s book Born Survivors: Three Young Mothers and their Extraordinary Story of Courage, Defiance, and Hope (Harper, 2015). Series: "Library Channel" [Humanities] [Show ID: 32849]

    • 57 min

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