300 episoder

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The Daily The New York Times

    • Daglige nyheder
    • 4.8, 318 vurderinger

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    The Sunday Read: 'A Speck in the Sea'

    The Sunday Read: 'A Speck in the Sea'

    John Aldridge fell overboard in the middle of the night, 40 miles from shore, and the Coast Guard was looking in the wrong place. This is a story about isolation — and our struggle to close the space between us.

    This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.

    This is the article read in this episode, written by Paul Tough.

    • 48 min.
    Jack Dorsey on Twitter's Mistakes

    Jack Dorsey on Twitter's Mistakes

    It’s been four years since the 2016 election laid bare the powerful role that social media companies have come to play in shaping political discourse and beliefs in America.

    Since then, there have been growing calls to address the spread of polarization and misinformation promoted on such platforms.

    While Facebook has been slower to acknowledge a need for change, Twitter has embraced the challenge, acknowledging that the company made mistakes in the past. But with three months to go until the 2020 election, these changes have been incremental, and Twitter itself is more popular than ever.

    Today, Jack Dorsey, Twitter’s C.E.O., discusses the platform’s flaws, its polarizing potential — and his vision for the future.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: A 17-year-old in Florida was recently responsible for one of the worst hacking attacks in Twitter’s history — successfully breaching the accounts of some of the world’s most famous people, including Barack Obama, Kanye West and Elon Musk. But did the teenager do the country a favor?Twitter is in hot water with the government for sharing with advertisers phone numbers given to the company for personal security purposes

    • 39 min.
    The Day That Shook Beirut

    The Day That Shook Beirut

    A mangled yellow door. Shattered glass. Blood.

    A devastating explosion of ammonium nitrate stored at the port in Beirut killed at least 135 people and razed entire neighborhoods on Tuesday. This is what our correspondent in the Lebanese capital saw when the blast turned her apartment “into a demolition site” — and what happened in the hours after.

    Guest: Vivian Yee, our correspondent based in Beirut. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: As the shock of the blast turns to anger in Lebanon, this is what we know so far about the explosion.In a land conditioned by calamity, Vivian wrote about what it felt like to emerge from the debris into the kindness of strangers and friends.

    • 22 min.
    ‘Stay Black and Die’

    ‘Stay Black and Die’

    Demonstrations against police brutality are entering their third month, but meaningful policy action has not happened. We speak with one demonstrator about her journey to the front lines of recent protests — and the lessons she’s learned about the pace of change.

    Caitlin Dickerson, an immigration reporter at The New York Times, spoke with Sharhonda Bossier, deputy director at Education Leaders of Color, an advocacy group.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: While protests in most American cities have tapered off, the confrontation between protesters and federal agents in downtown Portland, Ore., continues.Here is our latest reporting on the protests against racism and police violence that spread around the world after the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis in May.

    • 41 min.
    Is the U.S. Ready to Vote by Mail?

    Is the U.S. Ready to Vote by Mail?

    The United States is preparing to hold its first ever socially distant presidential election. But will it actually work?

    Guest: Reid J. Epstein, who covers campaigns and elections for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: President Trump’s suggestion that the Nov. 3 vote could be delayed — something he cannot do on his own — drew unusually firm Republican resistance and signaled worry about his re-election bid.Georgia’s troubled primary elections in June may be a preview of graver battles coming in the general election.

    • 24 min.
    Wrongfully Accused by an Algorithm

    Wrongfully Accused by an Algorithm

    Facial recognition is becoming an increasingly central component of police departments’ efforts to solve crimes. But can algorithms harbor racial bias?

    Guest: Annie Brown, a producer for The New York Times, speaks with Kashmir Hill, a technology reporter, about her interview with Robert Julian-Borchak Williams, who was arrested after being misidentified as a criminal by an algorithm. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: In response to Mr. Williams’s story being published by The New York Times, the Wayne County prosecutor’s office said that he could have the case and his fingerprint data expunged.

    • 25 min.

Kundeanmeldelser

4.8 ud af 5
318 vurderinger

318 vurderinger

Magnusp2 ,

Fantastic

A podcast where you know a lot more when you’re done listening, but it still feels like knowing less. Because suddenly you get to understand the complexity and many nuances of a problem!
Can so strongly recommend

Stoffer68 ,

Very high quality!

Very well produced and relevant podcast. Very high quality.

vsstuk drubgg ,

Unsettling sponsorship

Brought to you by Shell, Johnson&Johnson, and others... what exactly is the role of major oil and pharma companies in the broadcast of NYT’s pod? And if their role is insignificant (yeah right) then why is NYT lending these companies credence by letting them advertise on their platform?

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