10 episodes

In The Idealcast, multiple award-winning CTO, researcher and bestselling author Gene Kim hosts technology and business leaders to explore the dangerous, shifting digital landscape. Listeners will hear insights and gain solutions to help their enterprises thrive in an evolving business world.

The Idealcast with Gene Kim by IT Revolution Gene Kim

    • Management

In The Idealcast, multiple award-winning CTO, researcher and bestselling author Gene Kim hosts technology and business leaders to explore the dangerous, shifting digital landscape. Listeners will hear insights and gain solutions to help their enterprises thrive in an evolving business world.

    The Surprising Implications of Architecting for Generality

    The Surprising Implications of Architecting for Generality

    On this continuation of Gene Kim’s interview with Michael Nygard, Senior Vice President, Travel Solutions Platform Development Enterprise Architecture, for Sabre, they discuss his reflections on Admiral Rickover's work with the US Naval Reactor Core and how it may or may not resonate with the principles we hold so near and dear in the DevOps community. They also tease apart the learnings from the architecture of the Toyota Production System and their ability to drive down the cost of change. They also discuss how we can tell when there are genuinely too many “musical notes” or when those extra notes allow for better and simpler systems that are easier to build and maintain and can even make other systems around them simpler too? And how so many of the lessons and sensibilities came from working with Rich Hickey, the creator of the Clojure programming language. Bio:Michael Nygard strives to raise the bar and ease the pain for developers around the world. He shares his passion and energy for improvement with everyone he meets, sometimes even with their permission. Living with systems in production taught Michael about the importance of operations and writing production-ready software. Highly-available, highly-scalable commerce systems are his forte.Michael has written and co-authored several books, including 97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know and the bestseller Release It!, a book about building software that survives the real world. He is a highly sought speaker who addresses developers, architects, and technology leaders around the world.Michael is currently Senior Vice President, Travel Solutions Platform Development Enterprise Architecture, for Sabre, the company reimagining the business of travel. Twitter: @mtnygardLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mtnygard/Website: https://www.michaelnygard.com/ You’ll Learn About:Admiral Rickover’s work with the Naval Nuclear Reactor CoreBuilding great architecture for generality.Architecture as an organizing logic and means of software construction.Toyota Production System’s ability to drive down the cost of change through architectureClojure programming languageCynefin frameworkHow to know if a code is simpler or more complex RESOURCESCynefin frameworkFailure Is Not an Option: Mission Control from Mercury to Apollo 13 and Beyond by Gene Kranz"Why software development is an engineering discipline," presentation by Glenn Vanderburg at O'Reilly Software Architecture Conference"10+ Deploys Per Day: Dev and Ops Cooperation," presentation by John Allspaw"Architecture Without an End State," presentation by Michael T. Nygard at YOW! 2012"Spec-ulation Keynote," presentation by Rich Hickeyre-frame (re-frame is the magnificent UI framework which both Mike and I love using and hold in the highest regard — by no means should the "too many notes" comment be construed that re-frame has too many notes!)"Fabulous Fortunes, Fewer Failures, and Faster Fixes from Functional Fundamentals," presentation by Scott Havens at DevOps Enterprise Summit Las Vegas, 2019"Clojure for Java Programmers Part 1," presentation by Rich Hickey at NYC Java Study GroupSimple Made Easy presentation by Rich Hickey at Strange Loop 2011Love Letter To Clojure (Part 1) by Gene KimThe Idealcast, Episode 5: The Pursuit of Perfection: Dominant Architectures, Structure, and Dynamics: A Conversation With Dr. Steve SpearLambdaCast podcast hosted by David KoontzTIMESTAMPS [00:09] Intro[02:19] Mike’s reflections on Steve Spear, Admiral Rickover and the US Naval reactor core[04:33] Admiral Rickover’s 1962 memo[08:13] Cynefin framework[12:40] Applying to software engineering[16:06] Gene tells Mike a Steve Spear’s story[18:58] 10+ deploys a day everyday at Flickr[19:43] Back to the story[24:34] Why the story is important[27:35] When notes are useful[35:05] Too many notes vs. too few notes[40:00] DevOp

    • 1 hr 30 min
    Dispatch from the Scenius: Tempo, Maneuverability, and Initiative Subtitle: Micheal Nygard’s 2016 DevOps Enterprise Summit Presentation with Commentary from Gene Kim

    Dispatch from the Scenius: Tempo, Maneuverability, and Initiative Subtitle: Micheal Nygard’s 2016 DevOps Enterprise Summit Presentation with Commentary from Gene Kim

    In the latest Dispatch from the Scenius, Gene Kim provides original commentary on Michael Nygard’s 2016 DevOps Enterprise Summit presentation Tempo, Maneuverability, and InitiativeDevOps has been and continues to be part of a larger shift in organizational structure, system architecture, infrastructure, and process design. In order to be successful, each of these must change together to achieve a high tempo. In this presentation, Nygard talks about maneuverability and how to get teams, and teams of teams, working toward a common objective. And he provides principles and patterns for how large organizations can overcome the pitfalls they so often face.In this presentation, Nygard provides several real-life examples of failed and successful transformation efforts through a lens of tempo, maneuver warfare, and initiative. Bio:Michael Nygard strives to raise the bar and ease the pain for developers around the world. He shares his passion and energy for improvement with everyone he meets, sometimes even with their permission. Living with systems in production taught Michael about the importance of operations and writing production-ready software. Highly-available, highly-scalable commerce systems are his forte.Michael has written and co-authored several books, including 97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know and the bestseller Release It!, a book about building software that survives the real world. He is a highly sought speaker who addresses developers, architects, and technology leaders around the world.Michael is currently Senior Vice President, Travel Solutions Platform Development Enterprise Architecture, for Sabre, the company reimagining the business of travel.Twitter: @mtnygardLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mtnygard/Website: https://www.michaelnygard.com/You’ll Learn About:John Boyd’s energy maneuverability theory and maneuver warfareArchitect elevatorEdge of InstabilityDisposable infrastructureHorizontal and vertical integrityRESOURCESRelease It!: Design and Deploy Production-Ready Software (Pragmatic Programmers) by Michael T. NygardArchitect Elevator by Gregor HohpeGregor Hohpe’s presentation at SummerSOC 2019DevOps Enterprise Summit Las Vegas - VirtualTIMESTAMPS[00:07] Intro[01:20] Mike Nygard’s speech[02:29] A story of despair and hope[03:55] Gene explains the joke[04:15] Back to Mike’s story[09:17] Military concept: manoeuvrability[14:12] Architect Elevator[16:50] Edge of Instability[17:55] DevOps Enterprise Summit 2020[19:32] War of attrition[20:47] Disposable infrastructure[22:59] Studying tempo[24:57] Horizontal and vertical integrity[28:52] What is the intent[32:44] Gene’s last observations[36:46] Outro

    • 37 min
    Architecture as the Organizing Logic for Components, and the Means for their Construction

    Architecture as the Organizing Logic for Components, and the Means for their Construction

    In the latest episode of The Idealcast, Gene Kim is joined by Michael Nygard, a senior vice president at Sabre and author of the bestselling Release It! Nygard has helped businesses and technology leaders in their transformation journeys over his long career and was even one of the inspirations behind The Unicorn Project’s protagonist, Maxine. In their discussion, Kim and Nygard explore how we can enable thousands or even tens of thousands of engineers to work together toward common objectives, including the structure and dynamics required to achieve it. They also examine what truly great architecture looks like and the continuing importance and relevance of Conway’s Law. Bio:Michael Nygard strives to raise the bar and ease the pain for developers around the world. He shares his passion and energy for improvement with everyone he meets, sometimes even with their permission. Living with systems in production taught Michael about the importance of operations and writing production-ready software. Highly-available, highly-scalable commerce systems are his forte.Michael has written and co-authored several books, including 97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know and the bestseller Release It!, a book about building software that survives the real world. He is a highly sought speaker who addresses developers, architects, and technology leaders around the world.Michael is currently Senior Vice President, Travel Solutions Platform Development Enterprise Architecture, for Sabre, the company reimagining the business of travel. Twitter: @mtnygardLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mtnygard/Website: https://www.michaelnygard.com/You’ll Learn About:How to build great architecture for large teams.The real implications of Conway’s Law.Architecture as an organizing logic and means of software construction.Real-life stories of technology leaders’ transformation journeys.Decentralized economic decision making.The fear cycle and predictability.The after effects of the Yegge memo.A great definition of what great architecture is. Leadership and the relationship between the business’ architecture and the technology architecture of the business.RESOURCESRelease It!: Design and Deploy Production-Ready Software (Pragmatic Programmers) by Michael T. NygardClojure programming languageTransaction Processing Facility (TPF) operating systemTotality CorporationThe Principles of Product Development Flow: Second Generation Lean Product Development by Donald G. ReinertsenMCDP1: WarfightingConway's lawTeam of Teams: New Rules of Engagement for a Complex World by General Stanley McChrystal with Tantum Collins, David Silverman and Chris FussellThe Fear Cycle by Michael T. NygardState of DevOps ReportDevOps Enterprise Summit 2020Coherence Penalty for Humans by Michael T. NygardMichael Nygard on Cognicast podcast TIMESTAMPS [00:07] Intro[02:12] Meet Mike Nygard[04:36] What is TPF operating system?[05:40] Finding the perspective to write Release It![11:07] Totality Corporation[13:54] Moving large teams towards common objective[18:37] Decentralized economic decision making[19:52] The Principles of Product Development Flow[23:38] Tale of two outages[27:27] Distance incentive supply[32:00] Architecture is one top predictors of performance[35:05] Other attributes of good architecture[39:19] The Fear Cycle[43:40] An amazing finding in State of DevOps Report[45:02] Amazon replatforming example[50:35] The universal takeaways[53:07] DevOps Enterprise Summit 2020[54:55] Characteristics of reorganizations and structural changes[1:00:00] Self-contained systems[1:02:40] Mike’s definition of architecture[1:07:13] Coherence Penalty for Humans[1:10:10] Leadership’s responsibility to the architecture

    • 1 hr 33 min
    The Topography of Problems, and the Importance of Distributed Problem Solving with Dr. Steve Spear

    The Topography of Problems, and the Importance of Distributed Problem Solving with Dr. Steve Spear

    In this bonus follow-up interview, Gene Kim and Dr. Steve Spear dig into what makes for great leadership today, including the importance of distributed decision-making and problem-solving. They showcase the real advantages of allowing more decisions to be made by the people closest to the work, who are the most suited to solve them. Dr. Spear also shares his personal accounts of the honorable Paul O’Neill, the late CEO of Alcoa who built an incredible culture of safety and performance during his tenure. And Kim and Spear dive deeper into the structure and dynamics of the famous MIT beer game. ABOUT THE GUESTDr. Steve Spear (DBA MS MS) is principal for HVE LLC, the award-winning author of The High Velocity Edge, and patent holder for the See to Solve Real Time Alert System.  A Senior Lecturer at MIT’s Sloan School and a Senior Fellow at the Institute, Spear’s work focuses on accelerating learning dynamics within organizations so they know better faster what to do and how to do it. This has been informed and tested in practice in multiple “verticals” including heavy industry, high tech design, biopharm R&D, healthcare delivery and other social services, Army rapid equipping, and Navy readiness.  High velocity learning concepts became the basis of the Alcoa Business System—which led to 100s of millions in recurring savings, the Pittsburgh Regional Healthcare Initiatives “Perfecting Patient Care System”—credited with sharp reductions in complications like MRSA and CLABs, Pratt & Whitney’s “Engineering Standard Work”—which when piloted led to winning the engine contract for the Joint Strike Fighter, the operating system for Detroit Edison, and the Navy’s high velocity learning line of effort—an initiative led by the Chief of Naval Operations. A pilot with a pharma company cut the time for the ‘hit to lead’ phase in early stage drug discovery from twelve months to six.Spear has published in Annals of Internal Medicine, Academic Medicine, Health Services Research, Harvard Business Review, Academic Administrator, and the US Naval Institute’s Proceedings He invented the patented See to Solve Real Time Alert System and is principal investigator for new research on making critical decisions when faced with hostile data.  He’s supervised more than 40 theses and dissertations. He holds degrees from Harvard, MIT, and Princeton and worked at the University of Tokyo, the US Congress Office of Technology Assessment and Prudential Bache.LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/stevespearEmail: steve@hvellc.comWebsite: thehighvelocityedge.com You’ll Learn About:Distributed decision-makingDeveloping group leader coreSafety culture at ALCOAThe need for specialization in an increasingly complex worldMIT beer gameFeedback builds trustEpisode Timeline:[00:10] Intro[01:36] Limitations of the leader[08:03] Taking the Moses example to the assembly line at Toyota[11:12] Developing group leader core[13:32] Back to the Moses problem[14:19] Gene’s two thoughts[16:01] Planet Money’s SUMMER SCHOOL 2: Markets & Pickles[18:38] An Excerpt from The DevOps Handbook[20:57] Paul O’Neill’s job to set standards[22:35] Elements of rugged topography[23:37] Sponsored ad: DevOps Enterprise Summit Las Vegas - Virtual[24:39] Setting context[25:30] The structure and resulting dynamics[28:00] Call it out early and often[30:45] Making everyone feel responsible[36:51] Safety culture at ALCOA[37:33] “If there’s a failure, it’s my failure”[38:52] Topography of the problem[42:27] Applying to the car example[46:50] Benefits of specialization in modern medicine[50:37] Complexity will keep increasing as time goes by or is it reduced?[52:31] The need for specialization will continue to grow[53:22] MIT Beer Game through the lens of structure and dynamics[1:00:14] Feedback builds trust[1:01:21] Dirty Harry’s final scene[1:03:08] OutroRe

    • 1 hr 4 min
    (Dispatch from the Scenius) Dr. Steve Spear’s 2019 and 2020 DOES Talks on Rapid, Distributed, Dynamic Learning

    (Dispatch from the Scenius) Dr. Steve Spear’s 2019 and 2020 DOES Talks on Rapid, Distributed, Dynamic Learning

    In the latest Dispatch from the Scenius, Gene Kim brings you two of Dr. Steve Spear’s DevOps Enterprise Summit presentations in their entirety. In Spear’s 2019 presentation, “Discovering Your Way to Greatness: How Finding and Fixing Faults is the Path to Perfection,” he talks about the need and the value of finding faults in our thinking that result in faults in our doing.  Spear continues to explore this lesson in his 2020 presentation about the US Navy 100 years ago, when they were at a crucial inflection point in both technology and strategic mission. It is one of the most remarkable examples of creating distributed learning in a vast enterprise.  As always, Gene provides exclusive commentary to the presentations.ABOUT THE GUESTS Dr. Steve Spear (DBA MS MS) is principal for HVE LLC, the award-winning author of The High Velocity Edge, and patent holder for the See to Solve Real Time Alert System.  A Senior Lecturer at MIT’s Sloan School and a Senior Fellow at the Institute, Spear’s work focuses on accelerating learning dynamics within organizations so they know better faster what to do and how to do it. This has been informed and tested in practice in multiple “verticals” including heavy industry, high tech design, biopharm R&D, healthcare delivery and other social services, Army rapid equipping, and Navy readiness.  High velocity learning concepts became the basis of the Alcoa Business System—which led to 100s of millions in recurring savings, the Pittsburgh Regional Healthcare Initiatives “Perfecting Patient Care System”—credited with sharp reductions in complications like MRSA and CLABs, Pratt & Whitney’s “Engineering Standard Work”—which when piloted led to winning the engine contract for the Joint Strike Fighter, the operating system for Detroit Edison, and the Navy’s high velocity learning line of effort—an initiative led by the Chief of Naval Operations. A pilot with a pharma company cut the time for the ‘hit to lead’ phase in early stage drug discovery from twelve months to six. Spear has published in Annals of Internal Medicine, Academic Medicine, Health Services Research, Harvard Business Review, Academic Administrator, and the US Naval Institute’s Proceedings He invented the patented See to Solve Real Time Alert System and is principal investigator for new research on making critical decisions when faced with hostile data.  He’s supervised more than 40 theses and dissertations. He holds degrees from Harvard, MIT, and Princeton and worked at the University of Tokyo, the US Congress Office of Technology Assessment and Prudential Bache. LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/stevespearEmail: steve@hvellc.comWebsite: thehighvelocityedge.com You’ll Learn About:The dire consequences when traditional retailers were late creating competitive eCommerce capabilities.Creating dynamic learning organizations.How fast feedback creates opportunities to self correct and improve in real timeHow the US Navy’s Battle of Midway compares to how organizations are responding to digital disruption today.Episode Timeline:[00:10] Intro[01:23] Dr. Steve Spear’s speech[01:44] What did I accomplish?[02:39] What did I discover today?[03:45] Start point with ignorance[05:21] High velocity learning[06:52] Courtney Kissler and Nordstrom[08:09] Steve’s examples of finding a potential solution[18:53] The Machine That Changed the World [19:57] High velocity learning is mother of all solutions[23:13] Shattered Sword[29:45] Homework: Garner feedback and make it better[30:59] The importance of high velocity outcomes[35:06] Steve’s ask for help[37:37] See to Solve[38:30] Steve’s presentation at DevOps Enterprise Summit 2020[45:34] Digital disruption[47:17] Bringing the whole Navy to solve the problem[50:00] Combat information center[53:30] Greyhound[54:48] Innovation across a group of ships[58:47

    • 1 hr 10 min
    The Pursuit of Perfection: Dominant Architectures, Structure, and Dynamics: A Conversation With Dr. Steve Spear

    The Pursuit of Perfection: Dominant Architectures, Structure, and Dynamics: A Conversation With Dr. Steve Spear

    On this episode of The Idealcast with Gene Kim, Dr. Steve Spear talks about the primary characteristics of dynamic learning organizations, through the lens of its structure and the resulting dynamics, and how it enables those organizations to win and dominate in the marketplace. From his 1999 Harvard Business Review article “Decoding the DNA of the Toyota Production System” to his bestselling book The High-Velocity Edge to his monomaniacal advocate for the scientific method employed by everybody about everything all the time, Spear’s influence on the successful pursuit of excellence and perfection is undeniable. Discussing everything from the importance of curiosity and experimentation, fast feedback, mission orientation, leadership, healthcare organizations, military strategy and organization, and of course Toyota, Spear and Kim explain why organizations behave the way they do and demonstrate why dynamic learning organizations are so successful.ABOUT THE GUESTSDr. Steve Spear (DBA MS MS) is principal for HVE LLC, the award-winning author of The High Velocity Edge, and patent holder for the See to Solve Real Time Alert System.  A Senior Lecturer at MIT’s Sloan School and a Senior Fellow at the Institute, Spear’s work focuses on accelerating learning dynamics within organizations so they know better faster what to do and how to do it. This has been informed and tested in practice in multiple “verticals” including heavy industry, high tech design, biopharm R&D, healthcare delivery and other social services, Army rapid equipping, and Navy readiness.  High velocity learning concepts became the basis of the Alcoa Business System—which led to 100s of millions in recurring savings, the Pittsburgh Regional Healthcare Initiatives “Perfecting Patient Care System”—credited with sharp reductions in complications like MRSA and CLABs, Pratt & Whitney’s “Engineering Standard Work”—which when piloted led to winning the engine contract for the Joint Strike Fighter, the operating system for Detroit Edison, and the Navy’s high velocity learning line of effort—an initiative led by the Chief of Naval Operations. A pilot with a pharma company cut the time for the ‘hit to lead’ phase in early stage drug discovery from twelve months to six.Spear has published in Annals of Internal Medicine, Academic Medicine, Health Services Research, Harvard Business Review, Academic Administrator, and the US Naval Institute’s Proceedings He invented the patented See to Solve Real Time Alert System and is principal investigator for new research on making critical decisions when faced with hostile data.  He’s supervised more than 40 theses and dissertations. He holds degrees from Harvard, MIT, and Princeton and worked at the University of Tokyo, the US Congress Office of Technology Assessment and Prudential Bache.LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/stevespearEmail: steve@hvellc.comWebsite: thehighvelocityedge.comYou’ll Learn About:Explore how Steve’s mental model of dominate architectures, structure and dynamics can explain why organizations behave the way they doThe conditions for organizational-wide learning that allows the achievement of amazing goals and to dominate in the marketplaceHow fast feedback creates opportunities to self correct and improve in real timeThe characteristics of a dynamic learning organizationEpisode Timeline:[00:08] Intro[00:21] Meet Dr. Steve Spear[04:47] Introducing the late-Dr. Clay Christensen[05:50] Working at a Tier 1 Toyota supplier’s plant floor[09:56] Steve’s dissertation and Dr. Clay Christensen[15:00] Dr. Clay Christensen’s involvement with Steve’s work[19:19] Creating a feedback generating experiment beyond Toyota[30:07] Why dominant architectures are important[33:22] The steering column example[36:28] What happens when the problems change?[41:45] The role structure and dynamic

    • 1 hr 44 min

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