22 episodes

a website and bi-weekly podcast for students and scholars of North Africa

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    • History

a website and bi-weekly podcast for students and scholars of North Africa

    France & Algeria: Origins and Legacies

    France & Algeria: Origins and Legacies

    Episode 409 with Jennifer Sessionshosted by Chris Gratien Download the podcast Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud In 1827, Hussein Dey, the Ottoman governor of Algiers, hit a French consul on the nose with a fly whisk during a dispute over unpaid French debts. And as the story goes, the rest is history. France soon invaded Algeria and stayed for over 130 years. But as our guest in this episode Jennifer Sessions explains, France's decision to invade and colonize Algeria beginning in 1830 was far less arbitrary and far more intertwined with domestic French politics than lore would have it. And while the invasion was partially about political divisions in France, even as French politics transformed French colonization in Algeria became a national consensus over the course of the 19th century. In this episode, we examine the importance of the early decades of French colonialism in Algeria for understanding what followed, and we consider the legacy of French colonialism in Algeria for France and Algeria today. « Click for More »

    The English in 17th-Century Tangier

    The English in 17th-Century Tangier

    Episode 388 with Karim Bejjithosted by Graham Cornwell Download the podcast Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud Tangier is in the midst of a massive renovation and expansion -- a new ferry and cruise port, a duty-free zone, and the massive Tangier Med shipping facility all meant to make the city and Morocco into a critical juncture of the global flows of goods, people, services, and capital. Of course, Tangier’s proximity to Europe and position astride the Strait of Gibraltar has long provided it with a cosmopolitan, international character, typified by the International Zone days during European colonial rule of Morocco in the first half of the twentieth century. But Tangier’s polyglot, imperial past goes back much further. In this episode, we turn to one of those more distant episodes: the English occupation of Tangier from 1661 to 1684. It was a brief interlude: control of the city itself was part of Catherine of Braganza’s dowry to King Charles II, but English forces quickly found the situation (under intermittent but heavy resistance from local Moroccan tribes) unsustainable. The period produced some interesting characters on both sides--Samuel Pepys, for one, was a resident--but has generally been overlooked by scholars in favor of the Portuguese imperial enclaves on the Atlantic coast. What made English Tangier unique? Why did it fail, and how did the experience shape Moroccan-English relations in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries? This episode is cross-listed with tajine, our series on the history and society of North Africa. « Click for More »

    Slavery and Servitude in the Ottoman Mediterranean

    Slavery and Servitude in the Ottoman Mediterranean

    Episode 362 with M’hamed Oualdi & Hayri Gökşin Özkorayhosted by Andreas Guidi Download the podcast Feed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud Our latest podcast in collaboration with The Southeast Passage examines how slavery flourished in the Ottoman Mediterranean in the wake of growing connectivity with other world regions and territorial expansion. The discussion draws out the ambiguity between slavery and servitude in the case of the Mamluks of the Tunisian Beylik during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Which economic processes, legal interpretations, and geographic routes impacted the evolution of the slave trade from the sixteenth century until its abolition? What are the possibilities for and problems in retracing the self-narratives of those directly involved in the slave trade? « Click for More »

    Moriscos and Iberian Thought

    Moriscos and Iberian Thought

    Episode 351 with Seth Kimmelhosted by Nir Shafir Download the podcastFeed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud In 1609 the Moriscos were expelled from the Iberian Peninsula, marking the end of a hundred year effort to assimilate as New Christians these former Muslims. In this podcast, Seth Kimmel speaks to us about the impact of these conversions and expulsions on Iberian intellectual history. We discuss how Spanish officials and scholars attempted to force Moriscos to abandon practices like speaking Arabic and going to the bathhouse. In the process, each of these groups had to define the line between religion and culture, not only for Islam but also for Christianity. At the same time, the need to explain the failure of Morisco integration required new techniques of narration, source usage, and philological expertise. Taken together, these are unexpected intellectual and religious developments from a tragic chapter of history. « Click for More »

    Disillusionment in Morocco’s February 20 Movement

    Disillusionment in Morocco’s February 20 Movement

    Episode 343 with Taieb Belghazi & Abdelhay Mouddenhosted by Graham Cornwell Download the podcastFeed | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud How do we assess fizzling protest movements? How do social scientists account for difficult-to-quantify facets of political engagement like emotion and momentum? In this episode, we discuss ihbat, or disillusionment, in the failures of Morocco’s February 20th movement. Part of the Arab Spring movements across the region, the coalition of groups that comprised February 20th rather quickly ground to a halt a few months later. In a major speech in March 2011, King Mohammed VI pledged major reforms, a new constitution, and a new election. In July of that year, Moroccans voted overwhelmingly in favor of stability and “consultation” and approved the new constitution. The euphoria of the early days of the movement subsided and gave way to feelings of ihbat. But disillusionment, as we discuss here, is not as one-dimensional nor permanent as one might think. Taieb Belghazi and Abdelhay Moudden point towards a possible new direction in political science research that uses literary and artistic sources to get at the emotional aspect of political engagement and organization. « Click for More »

    Les harkis restés en Algérie: tabou et non-dits

    Les harkis restés en Algérie: tabou et non-dits

    Episode 302 avec Pierre Daumanimée par Dorothée Myriam Kellou et Aurélie Perrier TéléchargerFlux RSS | iTunes | GooglePlay | SoundCloud Depuis la fin de la guerre d’indépendance, la question des harkis agite les consciences en France comme en Algérie. Pierre Daum, journaliste au Monde Diplomatique et auteur du livre Le dernier tabou : les « harkis » restés en Algérie après l’indépendance, est parti à la rencontre de ces supplétifs de l’armée française et de leurs descendants. Dans cet épisode, il explore avec nous les non-dits et tabous qui entourent cette question : qui sont ces plus de 400,000 Algériens, qui à un moment ou un autre entre 1954 et 1962, se sont engagés aux côtés de la France? Quelles étaient leurs motivations, et quel fut leur sort suite à l’indépendance de 1962? Au fil de la discussion, Pierre Daum bat en brèche un certain nombre d’idées reçues sur les harkis et explore leur signification dans l’imaginaire français et algérien. « Click for More »

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