30 episodios

The Dublin Festival of History is an annual free Festival, brought to you by Dublin City Council, and organised by Dublin City Libraries. The Festival has gained a reputation for attracting best-selling Irish and international historians to Dublin for a high-profile weekend of history talks and debate. The 2020 Festival will take place in September.
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Dublin Festival of History Podcast Dublin City Council

    • Historia

The Dublin Festival of History is an annual free Festival, brought to you by Dublin City Council, and organised by Dublin City Libraries. The Festival has gained a reputation for attracting best-selling Irish and international historians to Dublin for a high-profile weekend of history talks and debate. The 2020 Festival will take place in September.
.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Writing the History of 20th Century Europe

    Writing the History of 20th Century Europe

    In 1914 a civilization that had blandly assumed itself to be a model for the rest of the world had collapsed into a savagery beyond any comparison. In 1939 Europeans initiated a second conflict that managed to be even worse, a war in which the killing of civilians was central and which culminated in the Holocaust. We are delighted to welcome one of Britain’s greatest historians to discuss what it meant for the Europeans who initiated and lived through such fearful times. The episode was recorded at Printworks, Dublin Castle, on 1st October 2017.
    Sir Ian Kershaw’s work has chiefly focused on the social history of 20th century Germany. He is regarded by many as one of the world’s leading experts on the Third Reich, and is particularly noted for his biographies of Hitler.
    Robert Gerwarth is Professor of Modern History at UCD.

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    • 1h 2 min
    Lovers and Strangers: An Immigrant History of Post-War Britain

    Lovers and Strangers: An Immigrant History of Post-War Britain

    The battered and exhausted Britain of 1945 was desperate for workers – to rebuild, to fill the factories, to make the new NHS work. From all over the world, thousands of individuals – including many Irish emigrants – took the plunge. Most assumed they would spend just three or four years in the UK, sending much of their pay back home, but instead large numbers stayed and transformed the country. Recorded at Printworks, Dublin Castle, on 1st October 2017.
    Clair Wills teaches at Princeton University in the USA. Her books include Dublin 1916: The Siege of the GPO and The Best Are Leaving: Emigration and PostWar Irish Culture.
    Elaine Sisson is a cultural historian, writer, and lecturer, at Dún Laoghaire Institute of Art, Design and Technology.

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    • 1h 2 min
    The Last of the Tsars: Nicholas II and the Russian Revolution

    The Last of the Tsars: Nicholas II and the Russian Revolution

    The Last of the Tsars is a masterful study of Nicholas II, the last Tsar of All the Russias, a man who was almost entirely out of his depth, perhaps even willfully so. It is also a compelling account of the social, economic and political foment in Russia in the aftermath of Alexander Kerensky’s February Revolution, the Bolshevik seizure of power in October 1917 and the beginnings of Lenin’s Soviet republic. The episode was recorded at Printworks, Dublin Castle, on 1st October 2017.
    Robert Service is a Fellow of St Antony’s College, Oxford. He has written biographies of Lenin, Trotsky and Stalin and several other books on Russia past and present.
    Patrick Geoghegan is Professor of Modern History at Trinity College Dublin.

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    • 1h 10 min
    Dublin Festival of History Question Time

    Dublin Festival of History Question Time

    Our expect panel answer questions from the audience on a whole range of historical topics,with Joe Duffy keeping order, recorded at Printworks, Dublin Castle, on 1st October 2017.
    Catriona Crowe is former head of Special Projects at the National Archives of Ireland. In 2016 she presented the RTE documentary Life Before the Rising .
    Donal Fallon is a Dublin-based historian, publisher of the Three Castles Burning podcast, and worked as an Historian in Residence with Dublin City Council.
    Dr Jennifer Wellington is a lecturer in Modern History at University College Dublin.
    Joe Duffy is the presenter of RTE’s Liveline radio series. He is the author of the bestselling Children of the Rising, and co-author, with Freya Clements, of Children of the Troubles.

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    • 59 min
    The Russian Revolution Debate

    The Russian Revolution Debate

    In its centenary year the sheer apocalyptic scale of the Russian Revolution seems almost to defy comprehension. What began as a challenge to the decadence and complacency of the Romanov dynasty ended up in the slaughter of millions and the subjugation of an entire people. History has consigned the revolution to the tomb and celebrated its death but what, if anything, remains of the elevated goals and ideals which inspired it? Was the poison of Stalinism in Bolshevism from the beginning? Can it teach us anything one hundred years on and if so what?
    Our panel of experts examines these and other questions, featuring David Aaronovitch, Maria Falina, Judith Devlin, and Geoffrey Roberts.
    The epiode is chaired by Hugh Linehan of the Irish Times, and it was recorded at Printworks, Dublin Castle, on 29th September 2017.

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    • 1h 7 min
    The Darkening Age: The Christian Destruction of the Classical World

    The Darkening Age: The Christian Destruction of the Classical World

    The Darkening Age tells the story of how, between the 2nd and 6th centuries AD, the Christians of the late Roman Empire set out deliberately to destroy all the books, knowledge and temples of the ancient Roman and Greek worlds, killing pagan priests, burning libraries and erasing the wisdom of ages. All the great works that survived and prompted the Renaissance had to be translated back into European languages many centuries later from Arabic libraries. The Darkening Age brilliantly illuminates a dark and murky period of ancient history.
    Catherine Nixey is a critic and commissioning editor on the arts desk at The Times of London.
    Zuleika Rodgers is Director of the Herzog Centre in Trinity College Dublin’s Department of Near and Middle Eastern Studies.
    The episode was recorded at Printworks, Dublin Castle, on 30th September 2017.

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    • 57 min

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